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The Git Extensions repository browser seems to be more versatile than gitk in many ways.

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However, my very favorite command line option for gitk is --all. gitk --all shows all commits, including ones not reachable by any branch or tag. This is very useful for understanding what actually happens in git. For instance after a rebase you can still see the original commits that have been copied and abandoned (and even return to them with reset).

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Is there any way to make Git Extensions browser behave like gitk --all and show even unreachable commits?

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3 Answers 3

Right click to revision grid > Show branches > Show all branches

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No, that does not do what I want. That option shows all named branches, but it does not show commits that do not belong to a branch. In fact, the two screenshots above show the same repository at the same time, and I have "show all branches" turned on in Git Extensions. Still, Git Extensions browser does not show the three commits that are ahead of master, which are shown in gitk. – Klas Mellbourn Mar 24 '13 at 17:30
GitEx show detached commits too – KindDragon Mar 24 '13 at 20:36
That screenshot definitely seems to show what I want, but "Show all branches" does not do it for me. E.g. if I reset the branch to a previous commit, the newly detached commits disappear from view. Same with rebase. Is there any other setting you have turned on? I have version 2.44 [.Net 4] of Git Extensions. – Klas Mellbourn Mar 25 '13 at 2:06
Ok, I can reproduce something like your screenshot. However I can only do it like this: I am on master, then, on the command line, I reset master HEAD^ and then immediately checkout HEAD@{1}. That way I am in 'detached head' state, one commit ahead of master. At that point GitEx shows the "branch-less" commit. However it is not a truly abandoned commit, since HEAD is pointing to it. gitk --all on the other hand, can show commits that nothing is pointing to, not even head, as can be seen in my screenshot (but even gitk has limits, if you restart it, it will loose track of the commits) – Klas Mellbourn Mar 25 '13 at 18:37

The answer to your question is no. However, you can open gitk --all, with a little work.

If you're willing to sacrifice performance, you can get some more information by changing the following in Settings > Settings > Git extensions > Performance. Check "show current working changes in revision graph". I've left that off and ended up using the Hotkeys settings tab.

  • Hotkeys > RevisionGrid. Make sure "ShowAllBranches" has a shortcut key. It usually is Ctrl+Shift+A.
  • Hotkeys > Browse. Make sure GitGitK has a shortcut key. I've used Ctrl+K. It brings up gitk from inside Git Extensions. However, you then have to view all branches manually, so I'm not sure how useful you'll find it on its own.
  • Finally, I think the one you'll really like is the Scripts tab. You will need to manually add a Gitk --all script there, but then you can assign a hotkey to it. You then have gitk --all from inside Git Extensions.

Have fun :)

Apparently, there is also a feature request that is 3 months old for precisely this ;)

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Thanks, but I already had "show current working changes in revision graph" and "ShowAllBranches" turned on, and the result is as above, no unreachable commits are shown. Using Script to bring up gitk --all from Git Extensions, was a creative idea, but it doesn't really make the Git Extensions browser itself behave as gitk --all :) – Klas Mellbourn Jun 17 '13 at 19:20
No it doesn't. But it does get you to a right-click or keyboard shortcut away from that view. Yes, it is an extra window, but apart from that, it doesn't look like its possible. – Carl Jun 18 '13 at 0:46

Are you referring to something like "git reflog". That should show all of your commits that have been made, even if you accidentally do a reset later and lose previous commits. You can recover "lost" commits that way. I don't believe their is button in GIT extensions to show that information.

You usually have to do a git reflog in the command line to find the commit hash, then check out a branch with that hash. I have used that for recovering commits with merges gone bad before.

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I would like to have a graphical representation of the unreachable commits. – Klas Mellbourn Mar 28 '14 at 15:05 Just added a feature request for GIT extensions. I guess I could try to code it myself and do a pull request. – user1388160 Mar 31 '14 at 21:58
That would be a great addition to Git Extensions! – Klas Mellbourn Apr 1 '14 at 6:12

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