Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I love JavaScript's ability to define functions as variables and am trying to do something similar in Objective-C. In particular, I want to write a recursive function using an anonymous block that I can call on an object and have it work its way through a tree, applying a change at each node:

void ( ^setDetailsLoaded )( Product* ) = ^void ( Product* prod ) {
    prod.detailsLoaded = true;
    for ( Group* group in prod.groups ) {
        for ( Product* mod in group.mods )
            setDetailsLoaded( mod );
    }
};
setDetailsLoaded( product ); <-- error here

However, I'm getting the strange error error: address doesn't contain a section that points to a section in a object file[sic] when I run the program (which compiles fine).

I'm just wondering if perhaps I need to retain the block or something, or if I should just do this with function pointers instead of blocks.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Richard J. Ross III, Martin R, Anoop Vaidya, Vishal, Richard Brown Mar 24 '13 at 3:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Make the block itself a __block variable to capture it by reference instead of by value. –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 23 '13 at 19:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because of the way blocks are implemented—they make a const copy of all primitive type variables, and a strong reference to all object type variables referenced in them at creation time—attempting to recursively reference a block within itself will result in the crash that you saw.

You can solve this by using the __block annotation on the block variable itself:

__block void ( ^setDetailsLoaded )( Product* ) = ^void ( Product* prod ) {
    prod.detailsLoaded = true;
    for ( Group* group in prod.groups ) {
        for ( Product* mod in group.mods )
            setDetailsLoaded( mod );
    }
};

See @bbum's blog post on blocks for more details (specifically tip #7).

share|improve this answer
    
That is indeed it! Thank you--I will read up on the __block annotation. –  devios Mar 23 '13 at 19:09
    
"they copy all the variables referenced in them to the heap at creation time" No. They copy the values of all the variables referenced into the block at creation time. At creation time the block is still on the stack. –  newacct Mar 24 '13 at 6:07
    
@newacct You're right, I screwed that one up. I've edited my response to hopefully be less misleading. –  frozendevil Mar 24 '13 at 9:11
3  
I still get Capturing setDetailsLoaded strongly in this block is likely to lead to a retain cycle. –  yourfriendzak Dec 4 '13 at 3:44

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.