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So, I have:

Dictionary<some_enumerator, int> available_spaces;
Dictionary<some_enumerator, int> occupied_spaces;
Dictionary<some_enumerator, int> total_spaces;

The idea being that as I occupy spaces of given types, I can mark how many spaces of type X are occupied and check to make sure there are spaces available before I call Occupy(enum.space_type) on them.

Currently, I have simple getter/setters for Occupied and Available spaces:

public Dictionary<some_enumerator, int> Occupied_Spaces { get; set; }
public Dictionary<some_enumerator, int> Available_Spaces { get; set; }
public Dictionary<some_enumerator, int> Total_Spaces { get; set; }

Ideally, I'd like to recalculate the available spaces for each key (by simply subtracting occupied slots from total slots) whenever we call Occupied_Spaces, e.g. instead of doing this:

object.Occupied_Spaces[space_type]++;
object.RecalculateSpaces();

every time I modify Occupied_Spaces, I'd like to instead do something like (I know this doesn't work, but you get the idea:

public Dictionary<some_enumerator> Occupied_Spaces {
     get { return _occupied_spaces; }
     set { _occupied_spaces = value; RecalculateSpaces(); }
}

Currently, calling Occupied_Spaces[key]++ does not call the setter in Occupied_Spaces (I tested by throwing a debug print into RecalculateSpaces, which didn't fire).

But I don't know how to override the + (or any other basic operator for that matter) for Dictionaries. Is there a simple way to do this?

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Why do you need to override these operators? If you are using int these are defined already and cannot be overridden. – Oded Mar 23 '13 at 19:50
    
I know this doesn't work - what about it doesn't work? Loos OK to me. – Oded Mar 23 '13 at 19:51
    
Currently, calling Occupied_Spaces[key]++ does not call the setter in Occupied_Spaces (I tested by throwing a debug print into RecalculateSpaces, which didn't fire). – user462879 Mar 23 '13 at 19:55
1  
That's because you are not setting it - you would need to assign a new dictionary to the property for that to happen. – Oded Mar 23 '13 at 20:03
    
Just create a function that does the thing you want, and call that function whenever you want it done. IncrementOccupiedSpace(some_enumerator). – Dialecticus Mar 23 '13 at 20:10
up vote 3 down vote accepted
public Dictionary<some_enumerator> Occupied_Spaces {
    get { return _occupied_spaces; }
    set { _occupied_spaces = value; RecalculateSpaces(); }
}

Currently, calling Occupied_Spaces[key]++ does not call the setter in Occupied_Spaces (I tested by throwing a debug print into RecalculateSpaces, which didn't fire).

Right. That's because you're not setting Occupied_Spaces. Your Occupied_Spaces still refers to the exact same dictionary object, only its contents have changed.

Dictionary<,> does not have any Change event for you to subscribe to, so the problem you are facing is unsolvable. What you can do instead is create a custom class that implements IDictionary<,>, and use that interface. Your custom class can fire events when the contents of the dictionary change.

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You could avoid the need for synchronization by replacing Available_Spaces with this function:

GetAvailableSpace(some_enumerator e)
{
    return Total_Spaces[e] - Occupied_Spaces[e];
}
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