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C# HOMEWORK QUESTION: I am creating a console application that prompts for two integers, prompts for which math operation to perform, and returns the results. I was able to get it to work with my two operands hardcoded, and now I'm trying to instantiate two separate objects through user input instead of a hardcoded variable. I've stripped it down to the barebones code that I'm having issues with, and I suspect the problem has something to do with the way I'm creating two objects from the same method...but I'm not sure what.

Here's my main class...

 public class MainModule 
 {
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
         // get Operands
        Console.WriteLine("You Will Be Entering Two Integers.\n");
         //
        MathUI myOperand1 = new MathUI();
        int op1 = myOperand1.EnterInteger();
         //
        MathUI myOperand2 = new MathUI();
        int op2 = myOperand2.EnterInteger();

        Console.WriteLine("You chose {0} and {1}.", (int)op1, (int)op2);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
 }

...and the MathUI class that accepts inputs.

public class MathUI
{
    public int EnterInteger()
    {
        Console.Write("Enter an integer: ");
        int enteredInteger = Console.Read();
        return (enteredInteger);
    }
}

When I execute the program, I get a prompt for an integer. I enter, for instance, 3, here's my output.

You Will Be Entering Two Integers.

Enter an integer: 3
Enter an integer: You chose 51 and 13.

Math demo completed
Press <enter> to quit

When I press enter after entering the first integer, I automatically get a second integer; and when I try to output the integer values, they don't match my input.

What's going on here? Is there something wrong with the way that I'm instantiating MathUI and my two operands? Do I only need to instantiate one instance of MathUI then declare both variables under that one instance? I'm also not sure why the integer output does not match my input. All the variables are cast as int, so I should have int all the way through, right? I tried casting these as integers--(int)op1--just in case op1 was held in some internal form...but don't know what's going on there.

What am I missing?

share|improve this question
1  
nothing to do with objects, everything to do with Console.Read use ReadLine() instead, that way it stops reading after you press the Enter key –  Stan R. Mar 23 '13 at 22:09
1  
also you can instantiate one object from MathUI and call EnterInteger() twice –  Amir Ismail Mar 23 '13 at 22:11
    
a) why instantiate two MathUI instead of one if the operand is not a field of the object? b) use ReadLine() c) use int.Parse(x) –  Julián Urbano Mar 23 '13 at 22:12
    
@AmirIsmail - i was wondering if that was possible; thanks for the tip! –  dwwilson66 Mar 23 '13 at 22:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Problem is that you are using Console.Read method which returns a value after any key has been pressed. Also, result it returns is ASCII value of key pressed. In your case, you pressed 3 which has ordinal (ASCII) value of 51 in decimal system and then ENTER which has value 13. If you look at MSDN documentation, Console.Read returns an integer.

To read value user entered as a string, use Console.ReadLine method.

If you really need to read in key by key, you can use Convert.ToChar, and then ToString method to get entered key as string. Like so:

string key = Convert.ToChar(Console.ReadLine()).ToString();

Or you can use following code to read actual operand

int intOperand;
if (!int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out intOperant))
    Console.WriteLine("You pressed non-numeric key");

share|improve this answer

you need to make the Console.Read a Console.ReadLine as readline is triggered by the return key.

public class MathUI
{
    public int EnterInteger()
    {
        Console.Write("Enter an integer: ");
        int enteredInteger = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
        return (enteredInteger);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
fyi, this won't compile... –  Stan R. Mar 23 '13 at 22:10
    
Console.Readline returns a string. You need to parse the string to an int. –  Jason Watkins Mar 23 '13 at 22:10
    
made the conversion using Convert.ToInt32 –  bizzehdee Mar 23 '13 at 22:11
    
i'll give you a +1 to cancel out the -1 –  Stan R. Mar 23 '13 at 22:11

Use Console.ReadLine instead of Console.Read. With Console.Read, the return character is being passed as input to the second Read call.

Also note that the int that is returned by Console.Read is not parsing a numeric number, it is giving you the Unicode character value of the entered char. This is why you are getting the "wrong" numbers.

You need to use Console.ReadLine and parse the string result like so:

        public class MathUI
        {
            public int EnterInteger()
            {
                Console.Write("Enter an integer: ");
                int enteredInteger = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
                return (enteredInteger);
            }
        }

A couple other notes for your consideration:

  • There's no need to cast the values in the Console.WriteLine call.
  • You can make the MathUI class and EnterInteger method static.
share|improve this answer
    
It's not UTF-8, but UTF-16 (just like all characters in .Net). And calling that encoding “Unicode” is mostly true, but confusing (and the fact that Microsoft does it too doesn't change that). –  svick Mar 23 '13 at 22:10
    
@svick: Yep that was a typo. Not that it matters for 0-9 digits. –  Jason Watkins Mar 23 '13 at 22:12

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