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C newbie here. I've been looking around the forum and can't seem to get the help I need. What I am trying to do is pretty simple. I've declared a struct in my header then I have created an Array of this structure.

I then call a function, passing in a pointer to this array of structures, but within the function I get the error:

error: request for member 'XXXXX' in something not a structure or union

I believe this error is how I am passing my array of structures into the function, but I can't seem to figure out the right way to do it.

My header.h is as follows:

#ifndef HEADER_H_INCLUDED
#define HEADER_H_INCLUDED

typedef struct PhoneNumber
{
    char name[40];
    unsigned char number[10];

} PhoneNumber;


#endif // HEADER_H_INCLUDED

I haven't really got up to my display function yet, by my code is as follows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "header.h"

int main()
{
struct PhoneNumber PhoneNumbers[10];

//input phone number
inputPhoneNumbers(&PhoneNumbers);

//display PhoneNumber
displayPhoneNumbers(&PhoneNumbers);

return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}



int inputPhoneNumbers(int size, PhoneNumber *details[size])
{
    size = 0;
    printf("Enter a name\n");
    scanf("%s\n", &details[size].name);
    printf("Enter %s's number\n", details[size]->name);
    scanf("%s\n", &details[size].number);



   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}


int displayPhoneNumbers(PhoneNumber *number)
{
    printf("%s\n",number->name);
    printf(number->number);

}

Can someone point me in the right direction?

Cheers!

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1  
Note: inputPhoneNumbers(int, PhoneNumber*) requires you to pass the size of the array, which you aren't in main(). –  Inisheer Mar 24 '13 at 0:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The notation needs to be consistent. You have:

scanf("%s\n", &details[size].name);
printf("Enter %s's number\n", details[size]->name);
scanf("%s\n", &details[size].number);

I think it should be:

scanf("%s\n", details[size]->name);
printf("Enter %s's number\n", details[size]->name);
scanf("%s\n", details[size]->number);

However, there are a number of other problems, which I'm still working on.


Here's a single file SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct PhoneNumber
{
    char name[40];
    unsigned char number[10];
} PhoneNumber;

int inputPhoneNumbers(int size, PhoneNumber details[size]);
void displayPhoneNumbers(PhoneNumber *number);

int main(void)
{
    struct PhoneNumber PhoneNumbers[10];

    inputPhoneNumbers(10, PhoneNumbers);

    displayPhoneNumbers(PhoneNumbers);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

int inputPhoneNumbers(int size, PhoneNumber details[size])
{
    size = 0;
    printf("Enter a name\n");
    scanf("%s\n", details[size].name);
    printf("Enter %s's number\n", details[size].name);
    scanf("%s\n", details[size].number);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

void displayPhoneNumbers(PhoneNumber *number)
{
    printf("%s\n", number->name);
    printf("%s\n", number->number);
}

The primary change here is the change of type on the inputPhoneNumbers() function; you want to pass an array of PhoneNumber, not an array of pointers to PhoneNumber. That then means that the consistent notation uses . instead of ->.

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Thanks very much. So passing PhoneNumbers is actually passing the [0] address of PhoneNumbers... I am still confused as when to use the 'dot' operator and when to use the -> operator when referring to members of a struct, but I am sure some reading will clear that up. Thanks again! –  user968127 Mar 24 '13 at 2:22

Change int inputPhoneNumbers(int size, PhoneNumber *details[size])

to int inputPhoneNumbers(int size, PhoneNumber *details)

and call it like this inputPhoneNumbers(10,PhoneNumbers);

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Here's an attempt to un-confuse you (while hopefully not getting confused myself). Also as Jonathan notes, be consistent, and I would add try to use the simplest notation.

Accessing a struct

PhoneNumber a;
printf("%s", a.name); // Note a.name is a char pointer to the first byte of name

Through a pointer

PhoneNumber *a;
printf("%s", a->name); // Uninitialized pointer, would need allocation

An array of structs

PhoneNumber a[10];
printf("%s", a[0].name);
printf("%s", (a+0)->name); // note a is a PhoneNumber pointer to the a[0]

An array of pointers to structs

PhoneNumber *a[10];
printf("%s", a[0]->name); // Note a[0] is an uninitialized pointer
printf("%s", (*a[0]).name); // One would need to allocate storage

A pointer to an array of structs

PhoneNumber (*a)[10];
printf("%s", (*a)[0].name);
printf("%s", a[0][0].name);
// Sometimes, when you have the right address, you can simply cast:
printf("%s", ((PhoneNumber*)a)->name);

Here's what you probably want to do here:

int main()
{
   struct PhoneNumber PhoneNumbers[10]; // Array of structs, contiguous in memory

   //input phone number
   inputPhoneNumbers(PhoneNumbers); // Pass a pointer to the first element

   //display PhoneNumber
   displayPhoneNumbers(PhoneNumbers);

   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}


int inputPhoneNumbers(int size, PhoneNumber *details) // Take a pointer to a PhoneNumber
{
   /// ...
}
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