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Recently i faced a question in C#,question is:- There are three int arrays

Array1={88,65,09,888,87}

Array2={1,49,921,13,33}

Array2={22,44,66,88,110}

Now i have to get array of highest 5 from all these three arrays.What is the most optimized way of doing this in c#?

The way i can think of is take an array of size 15 and add array elements of all three arrays and sort it n get last 5.

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Can you have duplicates? ie, if Array1 and Array2 two both have the same number and it's also the highest number. –  Inisheer Mar 24 '13 at 2:54
1  
@jamylak: what if 5 highest values are all stored in one of the three arrays? –  Jack Mar 24 '13 at 2:54
    
@Jack oh right nvm. In that case just use quickselect for the 6th largest on all the arrays combined and use the numbers that come out higher than the pivot. If it's always the top 5 and doesn't change then you can just use a more simple approach –  jamylak Mar 24 '13 at 2:55
    
@inisheer,yes it can have duplicates –  F11 Mar 24 '13 at 2:55
    
Do you want to optimize for your effort, or the machine's effort? –  Kirk Broadhurst Mar 24 '13 at 3:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An easy way with LINQ:

int[] top5 = array1.Concat(array2).Concat(array3).OrderByDescending(i => i).Take(5).ToArray();

An optimal way:

 List<int> highests = new List<int>(); // Keep the current top 5 sorted
 // Traverse each array. No need to put them together in an int[][]..it's just for simplicity
 foreach (int[] array in new int[][] { array1, array2, array3 }) {
     foreach (int i in array) {
         int index = highests.BinarySearch(i); // where should i be?

         if (highests.Count < 5) { // if not 5 yet, add anyway
             if (index < 0) {
                highests.Insert(~index, i);
             } else { //add (duplicate)
                highests.Insert(index, i);
             }
         }
         else if (index < 0) { // not in top-5 yet, add
             highests.Insert(~index, i);
             highests.RemoveAt(0);
         } else if (index > 0) { // already in top-5, add (duplicate)
             highests.Insert(index, i);
             highests.RemoveAt(0);
         }
     }
 }

Keep a sorted list of the top-5 and traverse each array just once.

You may even check the lowest of the top-5 each time, avoiding the BinarySearch:

 List<int> highests = new List<int>();
 foreach (int[] array in new int[][] { array1, array2, array3 }) {
     foreach (int i in array) {
         int index = highests.BinarySearch(i);
         if (highests.Count < 5) { // if not 5 yet, add anyway
             if (index < 0) {                    
                highests.Insert(~index, i);
             } else { //add (duplicate)
                highests.Insert(index, i);
             }
         } else if (highests.First() < i) { // if larger than lowest top-5                
             if (index < 0) { // not in top-5 yet, add
                highests.Insert(~index, i);
                highests.RemoveAt(0);
             } else { // already in top-5, add (duplicate)
                highests.Insert(index, i);
                highests.RemoveAt(0);
             }
         }
     }
}
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obviously its an easy way,but is it optimsed way?it works same as taking a new array,adding all members of 3 arrays into it and then sort it.. –  F11 Mar 24 '13 at 3:25
    
you're right. I just added an optimized way. –  Julián Urbano Mar 24 '13 at 3:36

The most optimized way for a fixed K=5 is gong through all arrays five times, picking the highest element not taken so far on each pass. You need to mark the element that you take in order to skip it on subsequent passes. This has the complexity of O(N1+N2+N3) (you go through all N1+N2+N3 elements five times), which is as fast as it can get.

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Not sure it can't be done faster. It can be done in one pass, keeping a sorted array of the 5 currently highest encountered values, and during iteration checking each value in the original arrays against the lowest value in the 5-highest-temp array, updating it if necessary. Given the constant size of the array, sorting and checking doesn't add complexity.It may even reduce the time required to actually run the algorithm, since this way it won't need 5 operations for all values in the average case. –  G. Bach Mar 24 '13 at 3:21
    
@G.Bach That's absolutely correct, one pass will also do it. –  dasblinkenlight Mar 24 '13 at 3:25

You can combine the arrays using LINQ, sort them, then reverse.

    int[] a1 = new int[] { 1, 10, 2, 9 };
    int[] a2 = new int[] { 3, 8, 4, 7 };
    int[] a3 = new int[] { 2, 9, 8, 4 };

    int[] a4 = a1.Concat(a2).Concat(a3).ToArray();

    Array.Sort(a4);
    Array.Reverse(a4);

    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(a4[i].ToString());
    }
    Console.ReadLine();

Prints: 10, 9, 9, 8, 8 from the sample I provided as input for the arrays.

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complexity-wise, sorting is a bad approach. depending on the size of his input, it may not be relevant to optimize the log n away though. –  G. Bach Mar 24 '13 at 3:09
    
@G.Bach Correct. I was starting to edit the answer, but caerolus answered with the edits I was going to make. I didn't want to take any perceived credit away from him. –  Inisheer Mar 24 '13 at 3:11
    
obviously its an easy way,but is it optimsed way?it works same as taking a new array,adding all members of 3 arrays into it and then sort it.. –  F11 Mar 24 '13 at 3:25
    
@litte You are correct. Sometimes I believe showing the 100% optimized way can lead to unclear answers. But there is certainly value in the optimization. Also, sometimes the optimized way isn't necessarily needed. In this case, I don't think it was based on the OPs question and example. If he/she had posted that the arrays would contain many more elements, then a different approach would be warranted. –  Inisheer Mar 24 '13 at 3:31
    
@Inisheer: none taken :-) Anyway, the LINQ code I made is the same as yours but sorting in descending order. Not efficient. I now added an efficient way to solve it –  Julián Urbano Mar 24 '13 at 3:39

Here is the two way for doing this task first one is using only basic types and is the most efficient way, no extra loop no extra comparison no extra memory consumption, just pass the index of elements that need to be match with another one and calculate which is the next index to be match for each given array.

First Way -

http://www.dotnetbull.com/2013/09/find-max-top-5-number-from-3-sorted-array.html

enter image description here

Second Way -

int[] Array1 = { 09, 65, 87, 89, 888 };
int[] Array2 = { 1, 13, 33, 49, 921 };
int[] Array3 = { 22, 44, 66, 88, 110 };

int [] MergeArr = Array1.Concat(Array2).Concat(Array3).ToArray();
Array.Sort(MergeArr);
int [] Top5Number = MergeArr.Reverse().Take(5).ToArray() 

Taken From -

Find max top 5 number from three given sorted array

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Maybe you could have an array of 5 elements which would be the "max values" array.

Initially fill it with the first 5 values, which in your case would just be the first array. Then loop through the rest of the values. For each value, check it against the 5 max values from least to greatest. If you find the current value from the main list is greater than the value in the max values array, insert it above that element in the array, which would push the last element out. At the end you should have an array of the 5 max values.

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For three arrays of length N1,N2,N3, the fastest way should be combining the 3 arrays, and then finding the (N1+N2+N3-4)th order statistic using modified quick sort.

In the resultant array, the elements with indices (N1+N2+N3-5) to the maximum (N1+N2+N3-1) should be your 5 largest. You can also sort them later.

The time complexity of this approach is O(N1+N2+N3) on average.

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