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Does it goo idea to implement alphabet by factory method?

Example:

public class Alphabet
{
    public Alphabet(image picture, string name)
    {
       _picture = picture;
       _name = name;
    }

    public void Show()
    {
       _picture.Show();
    }
}

public LetterA: Alphabet
{
    public LetterA() : Alphabet("lttrA.png", "Letter A"){}
}

....


public LetterZ: Alphabet
{
    public LetterZ() : Alphabet("lttrZ.png", "Letter Z"){}
}

using:

Alphabet ltr1 = new LetterA();

Requirements: pictures will be never change, no adding methods in future

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Factory method provides a new instance of a class on each invocation. In your case, there's no need to create multiple instances, you can create an enum for the alphabets.

public enum Alphabet
{
    A(/*some image*/, "A"),
    B(/*some image*/, "B"),
    C(/*some image*/, "C"),
    D(/*some image*/, "D");
    // ... and so on till Z

    private final String name;
    private final Image picture;

    private Alphabet(Image picture, String name)
    {
       this.picture = picture;
       this.name = name;
    }

    public void Show()
    {
       picture.Show();
    }
}
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So, i need 26 classes and in additional method Instance (because of singleton). But, 26 classes remains 26 classes? I mean, there can be other way to implement alphabet, without sub-classes explosion? Thanks. –  zzfima Mar 24 '13 at 8:16
    
My point was that factory method is not relevant in this case. I've modified my earlier code to use enum instead of multiple singletons. Hope this helps! –  Param Mar 24 '13 at 19:23

Why would you want 26 subclasses? If I understand you want to map from a string letter to an image file. A simple map would be absolutely sufficient. And maybe a method to handle access to that map, to check that only letters are passed, normalizes them (to-uppercase), ...

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