Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am done with the input and process part of the program, but I don't know how to terminate the program with EOF. Here is my int main(void) code:

int main(void)
{
    int size;

    int n;

    char preorder[26];
    char inorder[26]; 

    while(/* I don't know what to put on this part...*/)
    {
        for(n = 0; n < maxSize; n++)
        {
            preorder[n] = ' ';
            inorder[n] = ' ';
        }
        preIndex = 0;

        scanf("%s %s", preorder, inorder);

        size = strlen(preorder);

        struct node *root = constructTree(inorder, preorder, 0, (size - 1));
        printPostorder(root);
        printf("\n");
    }

    return 0;
}

Every function is working fine, I've checked them separately. Basically the user wants to end this program by pressing Ctrl + Z (I'm working on windows, so it's Z). I have to use EOF. Thx in advance

share|improve this question
1  
Take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/1561770/… –  alex Mar 24 '13 at 8:21
    
Put any true value after the while (e.g. while(1), you want to explicitly break if he user hits Ctrl-Z. –  Anthon Mar 24 '13 at 8:23
1  
Worth noting perhaps that at the console in Windows EOF is sent with Ctrl+Z but in Linux it is Ctrl+D. –  Clifford Mar 24 '13 at 8:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Check the return value of your input functions. scanf will return the number of items stored or EOF if it encounters end-of-file.

As Anthon says, you can use while(1) as your loop control, and use break; to exit the loop.

while(1) {
    if (scanf(...) == EOF)
        break;
}

Don't be tempted to use the function called feof() because it only checks a flag in the FILE structure, ie. it will only detect an EOF after you've tried to read it. It can be used in a multi-tiered error handling structure, though.

while(1) {
    if (scanf(...) < N_elements_specified) {
        if (feof(...)) {
            /* EOF detected */
            break;
        } else {
            /* some other cause of insufficient data */
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
what do you usually put in the ... for (scanf(...) == EOF)? –  LarsChung Mar 24 '13 at 8:56
    
That depends entirely on the specific program. scanf will return EOF or not for any valid arguments. –  luser droog Mar 24 '13 at 8:58

You want to do something like:

while (scanf(...) != EOF) {

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.