Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

For simplicity's sake, I'll describe my issue as a theoretical here.

Imagine you have two tables-- MATCHES and FIGHTERS. 'Fighters' has a list of fighters (pk_fighter_id, fighter_name), any two of which can be scheduled to spar each other. 'Matches' is perhaps a three-field table (pk_fight_num, fk_fighter_id1, fk_fighter_id2) which keeps track of these pairings. Fighter1 and Fighter2 are foreign keys which reference entries in the Fighters table.

I need to get a list of all fights that shows who is fighting who, i.e. "23123 | Pacquaio | Marquez." How on earth do I structure my query for this though?

I'd imagine something like:

select fk_fighter_id1, fk_fighter_id2
from matches
inner join fighters on matches.fk_fighter_id1=fighters.pk_fighter_id
inner join fighters on matches.fk_fighter_id2=fighters.pk_fighter_id;

When I tried mocking this up in Access I cobbled this together but it doesn't work:

SELECT matches.match_no, fighters.fighter_name, fighters.fighter_name
FROM fighters 
INNER JOIN matches ON (fighters.fighter_id = matches.fighter2) AND (fighters.fighter_id = matches.fighter1);

So, any thoughts? I just don't know where to go from here.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are near to what you want. You only need to define a unique alias for the tables as well as the projected column that have the same name.

select  a.pk_fight_num,
        b.fighter_name firstFighter, -- <<== needed also
        c.fighter_name secondFighter -- <<== needed also
from    matches a
        inner join fighters b 
            on a.fk_fighter_id1 = b.pk_fighter_id
        inner join fighters c 
            on a.fk_fighter_id2 = c.pk_fighter_id;

The reason for adding alias on column names is only to be able to identify who is the fighter1 and the fighter2.

share|improve this answer

You have to alias a table if you join it twice. Or the database would not know which table you meant with fighters. For example:

select *
from matches m
inner join fighters f1 on m.fk_fighter_id1 = f1.pk_fighter_id
inner join fighters f2 on m.fk_fighter_id2 = f2.pk_fighter_id

The first join of fighters is aliased to f1, the second to f2.

share|improve this answer
    
I could only mark one best answer and don't have enough rep to vote you up but thanks for chiming in! – Ivan Mar 24 '13 at 11:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.