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Following the previous question using data.table

DT = data.table(x=sample(letters,1e7,T),y=sample(1:25,1e7,T),rnorm(1e7))
setkey(DT,x,y)

Can we use binary search to find

DT[x=='a' | y==25]

Remember that DT[J('a',25)] == DT[x=='a' & y==25]

share|improve this question
2  
SMALL reproducible example! 1e7 random draws from sample * 3?!! :-) – Simon O'Hanlon Mar 24 '13 at 14:51
1  
It takes 0.5 second on my 3 years old laptop... – statquant Mar 24 '13 at 19:23
    
@statquant, I think Simon was alluding to the fact that if 1e7 is a small sample, how big must the actual data be! ;) – Ricardo Saporta Mar 24 '13 at 19:25
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes:
In order to do a binary serach, we need the appropriate indices.

  indx <- rbind(DT[y==25, list(y=25), by=x], DT[.("a"), list(x="a"), by=y], use.names=TRUE)
  indx <- setdiff(indx, setdiff(indx, unique(DT[, key(DT), with=FALSE])))
  indx

  DT[.(indx)]

Benchmarking:
This gives us more than a 10x improvement over vectorized serach.

  identical(setkey(DT[.(indx)]), setkey(DT[x=="a" | y == 25]))
  # [1] TRUE


  library(microbenchmark)
  microbenchmark(UsingIndx = DT[.(indx)],  UsingVecSearch = DT[x=="a" | y == 25], times=100 )

  Unit: milliseconds
              expr       min        lq    median        uq      max
  1      UsingIndx  34.27562  41.70119  48.13215  49.29752 231.1669
  2 UsingVecSearch 506.62670 545.85673 636.67701 680.93894 802.0842


For convenience, we can wrap the "creating the index" portion of the code into a nice function, so that we can then call it in a single line. For example:

DT[.(OrIndx("a", 25, DT))]

Where OrIndx() is defined as follows:

OrIndx <- function(xval, yval, DT)  {
  # TODO: Allow for arbitrary columns and column names
  if(!is.data.table(DT))
    stop("DT is not a data.table")

  # create all appropriate combinations
  indx <- rbind(DT[y==yval, list(y=yval), by=x], DT[.(xval), list(x=xval), by=y], use.names=TRUE)

  # take out any combinations in indx that are not actually present in DT and return 
  return( setdiff(indx, setdiff(indx, unique(DT[, key(DT), with=FALSE]))) )
}

Explanation:

The idea here is that performing an "or" serach requires some form of combination.
In a standard vector search, this combination is of the results of each individual vector serach.

data.table offers some great speed improvements by allowing seraches such as

 DT[.(c("cdf", "tmb"), c(25, 3))] 

Therefore, a natural solution to the question would be to use:

 DT[.(c(<all values of x>, "a"), c(25, <all values of y>))] 

The only problem is that the recycling would not line up properly.
It would be ideal to have an option like

 DT[.(  list( c(unique(x), y=25), c(x="a", y=unique(y) )  )]

But as far as I can tell that has not been implemented (yet!)
So instead, we can take appropriate combinations.
The function OrIndx above does exactly that. (it s quick & dirty and there are more efficient ways of creating the index)


Update with additional benchmarks

As per @Aruns suggestion, we include

rbind(DT[J("a")], DT[J(setdiff(unique(x), "a"), 25)])
rbindlist(list( DT[J("a")], DT[J(setdiff(unique(x), "a"), 25)] ))

Tested on 1e6 and 1e7 rows:

  ## Using 1 Million rows
  > microbenchmark(Using_Indx = DT[.(indx)], Using_RbindList = rbindlist(list(DT[J("a")], DT[J(setdiff(unique(x), "a"), 25)])), Using_Rbind = rbind(DT[J("a")], DT[J(setdiff(unique(x), "a"), 25)]),  Using_VecSearch = DT[x=="a" | y == 25], times=70L )
  Unit: milliseconds
               expr       min        lq    median        uq        max
  1      Using_Indx  4.865089  5.755615  5.813938  5.957352   6.880743
  2     Using_Rbind 42.657953 49.239558 49.682407 50.505977 139.770670
  3 Using_RbindList 36.319170 44.169151 44.484350 45.279158 155.361338
  4 Using_VecSearch 49.003307 64.030384 64.443666 65.123886 150.099946


  ## Using 10 Milliion rows
  Unit: milliseconds
               expr       min       lq   median        uq      max
  1      Using_Indx  33.71108  47.5402  48.7574  50.75285 122.0950
  2     Using_rbind 492.38244 535.6062 565.8623 590.92841 727.3907
  3 Using_RbindList 436.29325 478.3626 507.4665 525.25980 657.6639
  4 Using_VecSearch 511.86248 607.8046 643.9822 688.36733 765.3997

  # Making sure all the same results: 
  > identical(setkey(DT[.(indx)]), setkey(DT[x=="a" | y == 25]))
  [1] TRUE
  > identical(setkey(DT[.(indx)]), setkey(rbind(DT[J("a")], DT[J(setdiff(unique(x), "a"), 25)])))
  [1] TRUE

Note that for SMALL tabbles (less than 15K rows), vector search is faster (for really small tables, about twice as fast)

  ## Using  100 Rows
  > microbenchmark(Using_Indx = DT[.(indx)], Using_RbindList = rbindlist(list(DT[J("a")], DT[J(setdiff(unique(x), "a"), 25)])), Using_rbind = rbind(DT[J("a")], DT[J(setdiff(unique(x), "a"), 25)]),  Using_VecSearch = DT[x=="a" | y == 25], times=150L )
  Unit: microseconds
               expr      min       lq    median       uq      max
  1      Using_Indx  884.819  901.854  917.3715  933.642 9740.046
  2     Using_rbind 2385.842 2424.893 2462.5210 2502.704 4266.637
  3 Using_RbindList 1962.504 2005.594 2027.4085 2069.516 4238.146
  4 Using_VecSearch  386.867  401.328  407.5730  420.647 2908.090

This pattern holds until about 10,000 rows, at which point we start to see the gains:

  ## 10,000 Rows
  Unit: microseconds
               expr      min       lq    median       uq      max
  1      Using_Indx  891.374  921.784  931.6585  956.737 3780.971
  4 Using_VecSearch  796.316  815.965  824.1480  845.151 2531.314

  ## 15,000 Rows
  Unit: microseconds
               expr      min       lq   median       uq      max
  1      Using_Indx  913.963  939.198  954.518  986.609 2900.174
  4 Using_VecSearch 1018.830 1041.449 1053.098 1072.188 8418.470

  ## 30,000 Rows
  Unit: microseconds
               expr      min       lq   median       uq       max
  1      Using_Indx  964.402  995.883 1018.535 1045.908  5999.390
  4 Using_VecSearch 1649.231 1709.090 1801.760 1927.976  8868.470

  ## 100,000 Rows
  Unit: milliseconds
               expr      min       lq   median       uq       max
  1      Using_Indx 1.142318 1.181023 1.198611 1.268417  3.611945
  4 Using_VecSearch 4.663948 4.763179 5.052995 6.058354 12.133510

  ## 10,000,000 Rows   (only ran 30 reps for this one)
  Unit: milliseconds
               expr       min        lq    median        uq      max
  1      Using_Indx  33.95004  42.24995  48.90363  50.15424 177.0991
  2 Using_VecSearch 512.34760 557.02867 622.37670 662.14323 861.3465
share|improve this answer
    
@Arun, yes of course, but that is essentially as slow as a vector search. – Ricardo Saporta Mar 24 '13 at 16:50
    
Your identical() gives FALSE (I guess floating point issue). – Arun Mar 24 '13 at 16:51
    
How is it vector search? I'm subsetting by key column? I'll post a benchmark. – Arun Mar 24 '13 at 16:51
1  
It's alright. I see what you did there now. Really nice! (+1). I'd still use rbindlist instead of rbind. – Arun Mar 24 '13 at 17:23
1  
@Arun, I added benchmarks for rbindlist as well (about a 10% improvement over rbind) – Ricardo Saporta Mar 24 '13 at 17:44

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