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Controller that creates user profile is using a profile view model part of which is a default logo (PNG) what will be presented and used, should user to choose not to upload his own.

I created public static class Configuration that keeps all the constants of the project. One of constants is file name and location that will be used for the default logo.

I keep the actual file name in Web.Config file rather than as hardcoded constant For several reasons: 1. File name can change 2. File location can change 3. Hate to hard-code anything, when I know it might change

Very first attempt to test the controller failed on that constants class accessing Web.Config by calling ConfigurationManager.AppSettings. People here (very justfully so) told me this is another dependency that should be avoided. On the other hand, its a mere externalized constant, which I don't like to keep hard coded like this File f = new File("..\\Images\\Profile\\DefaultLogo.PNG");. Nobody does these things and it should be configurable (meaning Web.Config - please correct me if I am wrong).

What will be your recommendation to deal with the situation?

Edit the question Let me reiterate the question: Its not what format to use, but rather how to deal with dilemma of having controller TDD testable and keep constants out of it architecturally. (Currently I use static class, so I have to pass all constants that controller needs by hand in the constructor, it doesn't look like the best possible option)

  • hardcode the constant (hate to do)
  • move it from controller to view model (which I don't think will solve the TDD problem)
  • have another interface abstraction (IConfiguration) in the controller along with IRepository (looks ugly to me) - moreover it won't work since Config class is static and cannot implement an interface
  • something I didn't think about, hence asking for bright ideas.

Thank you very much

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What if you stored the configuration constant values as an XML file, either as part of the solution or external to it (but still somewhere that is still accessible to the program)? That way you can edit the configuration values in the XML file without having to make changes to your code (which avoids hard-coding the values). –  Ciaran Gallagher Mar 24 '13 at 12:52
    
Thanks for the answer. XML is a good idea, but you know, Web.Config is XML as well. Its not what format to use, but rather how to implement constants so they're external to code, but still keep the controller testable (since they're external they introduce dependency) - I was struggling with this exact dilemma. –  Display Name Mar 24 '13 at 12:55
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

have another interface abstraction (IConfiguration) in the controller along with IRepository (looks ugly to me) - moreover it won't work since Config class is static and cannot implement an interface

The bold statement is not quite true. For example:

public interface IManageConfigurations
{
    string DefaultFileLocation { get; }
}

public class ConfigurationManagerImpl : IManageConfigurations
{
    public string DefaultFileLocation
    {
        get { return ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["DefaultFileLocation"]; }
    }
}

public class MyController : Controller
{
    private readonly IRepository _repository;
    private readonly IManageConfigurations _config;

    public MyController(IRepository repository, IManageConfigurations config)
    {
        _repository = repository;
        _config = config;
    }
}

I don't think this is an ugly solution, but that's mostly an aesthetic opinion, which is subjective. For the most part, I don't consider a class to reveal an overinjection anti-pattern until it has about 5 or more interface dependencies.

Moreover, this is pretty much a standard solution for dependency resolution in unit testable code. You can mock out the config interface just as you would mock out the repository. The above is how I resolve dependencies with values kept in web.config.

Another solution is to just hard-code the ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["key"] calls in your controller. Then, in your unit test project, you can just set the same values in your app.config file. The unit test runner will then look in the app.config for the values, whereas the web server will look for them in web.config.

public class MyController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        // the below will get the value from the unit test project's app.config
        // when run as a unit test, but will get the value from web.config in server
        var fileLocation = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["DefaultFileLocation"];
    }
}

Update

If you really want to keep strings in a static class, and have unit testable code, you can do this:

public static class ConfigSettings
{
    public static string DefaultFileLocation
    {
        get { return ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["DefaultFileLocation"]; }
    }
}

You can then use that static class freely from within a Controller. However, in order to provide values when run as a unit test, as I said above, you would have to put an appSettings node in your unit test project's app.config file, very similar to how you have an appSettings node in your web project's web.config file. The unit test runner will pull values from app.config, and the web server will pull values from web.config.

UnitTestProject\app.config

<configuration>
    <appSettings>
        <!-- use this value when executed in unit test runner -->
        <add key="DefaultFileLocation"
            value="C:\Users\me\test_files\test_file.png" />
    </appSettings>
</configuration>

MvcProject\web.config (default)

<configuration>
    <appSettings>
        <!-- use this value when executed locally in IIS Express -->
        <add key="DefaultFileLocation"
            value="C:\Users\me\Documents\Visual Studio 20xx\Projects\MyProj\App_Data\default_files\default_logo.png" />
    </appSettings>
</configuration>

MvcProject\web.Release.config (transform)

<configuration>
    <appSettings>
        <!-- use this value when executed on live IIS production server -->
        <add key="DefaultFileLocation"
            value="E:\approot\siteroot\App_Data\default_files\default_logo.png"
            xdt:Transform="SetAttributes" xdt:Locator="Match(key)" />
    </appSettings>
</configuration>

If this doesn't answer your question, perhaps I am still not fully understanding what you're after.

Update

I am only missing one piece in your solution - how to use that public static class ConfigSettings from within the controller? Should I pass this static class as a parameter into constructor?

No, you do not need to do anything special. Just use it as a class, like you would use the static ConfigurationManager.

public ActionResult MyAction()
{
    var customFilePath = GetCustomFilePath(); // may not be set
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(customFilePath)) // fall back to default
        customFilePath = ConfigSettings.DefaultFilePath;
}

So your controller action is taking a dependency on the static ConfigSettings class, but it is not an injectable / swappable dependency in this case. When the unit test runner invokes this method, and customFilePath is null / empty / whitespace, it will step into the ConfigSettings get method, which will call ConfigurationManager.AppSettings, which will look in the unit test project's app.config/appSettings for the value.

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Thanks! I must point out that the stress was on class being static meaning it cannot implement interfaces. And not having this class static kind of killing its purpose - if every time I need to reach out to constants, I need to create an instance of the class? Way too much overhead for just inline constants. Thoughts? –  Display Name Mar 24 '13 at 14:13
    
My foremost thought is on the semantics of your question, especially the word "constant". When I think of constants in .NET and C# code discussions, I think of the const keyword. To me, a constant is something that never changes. On the other hand, if there is a value that could change, either between unit tests or across different deployments (debug, QA, Prod), then it is a configuration setting, not a constant. I will update my answer based on your comment. –  danludwig Mar 24 '13 at 14:19
    
very good solution. Thank you very much. You getting it right. I am only missing one piece in your solution - how to use that public static class ConfigSettings from within the controller? Should I pass this static class as a parameter into constructor? You see where I coming from? If just run the code - it will pick up right location and file, but if I run tests, how do I let my controller know about the test ConfigSettings static class (and this is precisely where my problem lies). Thank you! –  Display Name Mar 24 '13 at 15:44
    
Thank you very much. Did very similar to what you suggested. Unfortunately string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace doesn't work here, since I am providing proper path to test file, which is not whitespace. I checked if path .StartWith("~") - this is production setting, and if not - its a test setting. Thank you very much again! –  Display Name Mar 24 '13 at 19:37
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