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Given a .txt files with space separated words such as:

But where is Esope the holly Bastard
But where is

And the Awk function :

cat /pathway/to/your/file.txt | tr ' ' '\n' | sort | uniq -c | awk '{print $2"@"$1}'

I get the following output in my console :

1 Bastard
1 Esope
1 holly
1 the
2 But
2 is
2 where

How to get into printed into myFile.txt ? I actually have 300.000 lines and near 2 millions words. Better to output the result into a file.


EDIT: Used answer (by @Sudo_O):

$ awk '{a[$1]++}END{for(k in a)print a[k],k}' RS=" |\n" myfile.txt | sort > myfileout.txt
share|improve this question
    
Why can't you pipe the output from your console to a file? You've done all the hard work. – duffymo Mar 24 '13 at 13:20
    
I'am TOTALLY new to Awk / console scripts. I copied-pasted this code, understand it, but that's my very first script. – Hugolpz Mar 24 '13 at 13:23
    
@Hugolpz it's a pretty inefficient method, take a look a my answer. You should let awk the whole job. – iiSeymour Mar 24 '13 at 15:13
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your pipeline isn't very efficient you should do the whole thing in awk instead:

awk '{a[$1]++}END{for(k in a)print a[k],k}' RS=" |\n" file > myfile

If you want the output in sorted order:

awk '{a[$1]++}END{for(k in a)print a[k],k}' RS=" |\n" file | sort > myfile

The actual output given by your pipeline is:

$ tr ' ' '\n' < file | sort | uniq -c | awk '{print $2"@"$1}'
Bastard@1
But@2
Esope@1
holly@1
is@2
the@1
where@2

Note: using cat is useless here we can just redirect the input with <. The awk script doesn't make sense either, it's just reversing the order of the words and words frequency and separating them with an @. If we drop the awk script the output is closer to the desired output (notice the preceding spacing however and it's unsorted):

$ tr ' ' '\n' < file | sort | uniq -c 
      1 Bastard
      2 But
      1 Esope
      1 holly
      2 is
      1 the
      2 where

We could sort again a remove the leading spaces with sed:

$ tr ' ' '\n' < file | sort | uniq -c | sort | sed 's/^\s*//'
1 Bastard
1 Esope
1 holly
1 the
2 But
2 is
2 where

But like I mention at the start let awk handle it:

$ awk '{a[$1]++}END{for(k in a)print a[k],k}' RS=" |\n" file | sort
1 Bastard
1 Esope
1 holly
1 the
2 But
2 is
2 where
share|improve this answer
    
the '> myfile' disapear of your codes, could you put it back ? You may also want to answer to this associated question with a link to here since your final awk code works for it too ! – Hugolpz Mar 24 '13 at 15:49
    
The > myfile redirects output from stdout to the file myfile that means you don't see the output in the terminal instead it is written to disk and you see nothing (assuming nothing is written to stderr). I don't use redirection after the first two awk scripts as I want the output to printed so you can see what is happening. I hope this is clear. – iiSeymour Mar 24 '13 at 15:57
    
I see. Most important: thanks a lot :) – Hugolpz Mar 24 '13 at 16:28
    
Can be complementary with @edouard_lopez Tips: "use tee which allow to redirect to a file AND still see the output" – Hugolpz Mar 24 '13 at 16:36
    
I had to use sort with the --numeric-sort flag so that the word counts were sorted by numeric value rather than string representation. – sevko Oct 5 '15 at 19:26

Just use shell redirection :

 echo "test" > overwrite-file.txt
 echo "test" >> append-to-file.txt

Tips

A useful command is tee which allow to redirect to a file and still see the output :

echo "test" | tee overwrite-file.txt
echo "test" | tee -a append-file.txt

Sorting and locale

I see you are working with asian script, you need to be need to be careful with the locale use by your system, as the resulting sort might not be what you expect :

* WARNING * The locale specified by the environment affects sort order. Set LC_ALL=C to get the traditional sort order that uses native byte values.

And have a look at the output of :

locale 
share|improve this answer

Just redirect output to a file.

cat /pathway/to/your/file.txt % tr ' ' '\n' | sort | uniq -c | \
awk '{print $2"@"$1}' > myFile.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Job done ! Thanks ! I validate your answer in 6 mins. – Hugolpz Mar 24 '13 at 13:27

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