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I have two questions about templates in C++. Let's imagine I have written a simple List and now I want to use it in my program to store pointers to different object types (A*, B* ... ALot*). My colleague says that for each type there will be generated a dedicated piece of code, even though all pointers in fact have the same size.

If this is true, can somebody explain me why? For example in Java generics have the same purpose as templates for pointers in C++. Generics are only used for pre-compile type checking and are stripped down before compilation. And of course the same byte code is used for everything.

Second question is, will dedicated code be also generated for char and short (considering that they both have the same size and there are no specialization).

If this makes any difference, we are talking about embedded applications.

I have found a similar question, but it did not completely answer my question: Do C++ template classes duplicate code for each pointer type used?

Thanks a lot!

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8  
how did it not completely answer your question? What did it not answer? –  imulsion Mar 24 '13 at 14:11
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char and short do not have the same size, char is 1 byte, short is 2 bytes. –  antonijn Mar 24 '13 at 14:11
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Java Generics have pretty much nothing in common with C++ templates. Except the <> syntax maybe. –  Mat Mar 24 '13 at 14:12
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Also, don't generalize generics. There are multiple types of generics. Java uses the very horrible type-erasure method for generics. .NET languages (C#, VB etc) use reificated generics. Reificated generics are not "stripped down" before compilation. –  antonijn Mar 24 '13 at 14:13
    
@Mat I know, and I wanted to edit the comment to say "usually" after I noticed, but that's no longer possible. –  antonijn Mar 24 '13 at 14:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have two questions about templates in C++. Let's imagine I have written a simple List and now I want to use it in my program to store pointers to different object types (A*, B* ... ALot*). My colleague says that for each type there will be generated a dedicated piece of code, even though all pointers in fact have the same size.

Yes, this is equivalent to having both functions written.

Some linkers will detect the identical functions, and eliminate them. Some libraries are aware that their linker doesn't have this feature, and factor out common code into a single implementation, leaving only a casting wrapper around the common code. Ie, a std::vector<T*> specialization may forward all work to a std::vector<void*> then do casting on the way out.

Now, comdat folding is delicate: it is relatively easy to make functions you think are identical, but end up not being the same, so two functions are generated. As a toy example, you could go off and print the typename via typeid(x).name(). Now each version of the function is distinct, and they cannot be eliminated.

In some cases, you might do something like this thinking that it is a run time property that differs, and hence identical code will be created, and the identical functions eliminated -- but a smart C++ compiler might figure out what you did, use the as-if rule and turn it into a compile-time check, and block not-really-identical functions from being treated as identical.

If this is true, can somebody explain me why? For example in Java generics have the same purpose as templates for pointers in C++. Generics are only used for per-compile type checking and are stripped down before compilation. And of course the same byte code is used for everything.

No, they aren't. Generics are roughly equivalent to the C++ technique of type erasure, such as what std::function<void()> does to store any callable object. In C++, type erasure is often done via templates, but not all uses of templates are type erasure!

The things that C++ does with templates that are not in essence type erasure are generally impossible to do with Java generics.

In C++, you can create a type erased container of pointers using templates, but std::vector doesn't do that -- it creates an actual container of pointers. The advantage to this is that all type checking on the std::vector is done at compile time, so there doesn't have to be any run time checks: a safe type-erased std::vector may require run time type checking and the associated overhead involved.

Second question is, will dedicated code be also generated for char and short (considering that they both have the same size and there are no specialization).

They are distinct types. I can write code that will behave differently with a char or short value. As an example:

std::cout << x << "\n";

with x being a short, this print an integer whose value is x -- with x being a char, this prints the character corresponding to x.

Now, almost all template code exists in header files, and is implicitly inline. While inline doesn't mean what most folk think it means, it does mean that the compiler can hoist the code into the calling context easily.

If this makes any difference, we are talking about embedded applications.

What really makes a difference is what your particular compiler and linker is, and what settings and flags they have active.

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The answer is maybe. In general, each instantiation of a template is a unique type, with a unique implementation, and will result in a totally independent instance of the code. Merging the instances is possible, but would be considered "optimization" (under the "as if" rule), and this optimization isn't wide spread.

With regards to comparisons with Java, there are several points to keep in mind:

  • C++ uses value semantics by default. An std::vector, for example, will actually insert copies. And whether you're copying a short or a double does make a difference in the generated code. In Java, short and double will be boxed, and the generated code will clone a boxed instance in some way; cloning doesn't require different code, since it calls a virtual function of Object, but physically copying does.

  • C++ is far more powerful than Java. In particular, it allows comparing things like the address of functions, and it requires that the functions in different instantiations of templates have different addresses. Usually, this is not an important point, and I can easily imagine a compiler with an option which tells it to ignore this point, and to merge instances which are identical at the binary level. (I think VC++ has something like this.)

Another issue is that the implementation of a template in C++ must be present in the header file. In Java, of course, everything must be present, always, so this issue affects all classes, not just template. This is, of course, one of the reasons why Java is not appropriate for large applications. But it means that you don't want any complicated functionality in a template; doing so loses one of the major advantages of C++, compared to Java (and many other languages). In fact, it's not rare, when implementing complicated functionality in templates, to have the template inherit from a non-template class which does most of the implementation in terms of void*. While implementing large blocks of code in terms of void* is never fun, it does have the advantage of offering the best of both worlds to the client: the implementation is hidden in compiled files, invisible in any way, shape or manner to the client.

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Hi James, thanks a lot for your answer! I can argue about Java being not suitable for large applications :-) but I won't. My question was only about a template list and other containers, which contain absolutely no logic which can manipulate these objects except for storing them. If you say that exactly same binary code may be merged, I am happy. –  Yuriy Kulikov Mar 24 '13 at 14:38
    
@YuriyKulikov I say that it may be merged under the "as if" rule, not that it will be merged. For things like std::list, the code is all inline and trivial; after inlining, there will probably be nothing left to merge. (This is, of course, what the JIT compiler does in Java. Formally, the instantiation of a Java template is full of type conversions, which correspond to a dynamic_cast in C++, and are fairly expensive in runtime. In practice, the JIT will be able to eliminate most, if not all of the checked conversions, and do the equivalent of a static_cast.) –  James Kanze Mar 24 '13 at 18:56

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