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This should be dead simple, but I cannot get it to work for the life of me.
I'm just trying to connect remotely to my MySQL server.

connecting as

mysql -u root -h localhost -p  

works fine, but trying

mysql -u root -h 'any ip address here' -p

fails with the error

ERROR 1130 (00000): Host ''xxx.xx.xxx.xxx'' is not allowed to connect to this MySQL server

In the mysql.user table, there is exactly the same entry for user 'root' with host 'localhost' as another with host '%'.

I'm at my wits' end, and have no idea how to proceed. Any ideas are welcome.

share|improve this question
2  
This link explains about the error: webyog.com/faq/content/23/36/en/… – Ashwin A Aug 6 '12 at 11:33

13 Answers 13

up vote 322 down vote accepted

Possibly a security precaution. You could try adding a new administrator account:

mysql> CREATE USER 'monty'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'some_pass';
mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'monty'@'localhost'
    ->     WITH GRANT OPTION;
mysql> CREATE USER 'monty'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'some_pass';
mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'monty'@'%'
    ->     WITH GRANT OPTION;

Although as Pascal and others have noted it's not a great idea to have a user with this kind of access open to any IP. If you need an administrative user, use root, and leave it on localhost. For any other action specify exactly the privileges you need and limit the accessibility of the user as Pascal has suggest below.

Edit:

From the MySQL FAQ:

If you cannot figure out why you get Access denied, remove from the user table all entries that have Host values containing wildcards (entries that contain '%' or '_' characters). A very common error is to insert a new entry with Host='%' and User='some_user', thinking that this allows you to specify localhost to connect from the same machine. The reason that this does not work is that the default privileges include an entry with Host='localhost' and User=''. Because that entry has a Host value 'localhost' that is more specific than '%', it is used in preference to the new entry when connecting from localhost! The correct procedure is to insert a second entry with Host='localhost' and User='some_user', or to delete the entry with Host='localhost' and User=''. After deleting the entry, remember to issue a FLUSH PRIVILEGES statement to reload the grant tables. See also Section 5.4.4, “Access Control, Stage 1: Connection Verification”.

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7  
Good catch Yannick, however I would not recommend him granting all privileges to a non-root user. Perhaps a reduced set? – cballou Oct 13 '09 at 12:50
2  
Well, this indeed wouldn't be a good idea, but allowing 'root' to connect from all hosts is exactly the same, since it is at the same privilege level. – Yannick Motton Oct 13 '09 at 12:58
1  
I think you miss my point Pascal. The point is that the 'root' user has those rights already, and he wants to let any ip authenticate as that user. So if this is really what he wants, the default example of creating a new administrator user (which has exactly the same rights) is an alternative to what he's trying. – Yannick Motton Oct 13 '09 at 13:11
1  
That's right Yannick, I read to fast and will remove my comment. However, AFAIK, permissions are working fine in MySQL so: 1. maybe the OP modified the grant tables manually and then need to flush privileges. 2. maybe he didn't use the proper grant syntax for root. Adding another administrative user might be a workaround but it won't solve the real issue IMHO. – Pascal Thivent Oct 13 '09 at 13:26
    
I felt that providing access from all hosts to root was not a proper solution. Instead I created a new user and granted a reduced set of privileges, the set I used is described as 'DBManager' on MySQL Workbench. I also only allowed access from a certain group of hosts in my local network, particularly 192.168.0.% – Gustavo Guevara Jul 26 '14 at 15:20

One has to create a new MySQL User and assign privileges as below in Query prompt via phpMyAdmin or command prompt:

CREATE USER 'username'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'username'@'localhost' WITH GRANT OPTION;

CREATE USER 'username'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'username'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION;

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Once done with all four queries, it should connect with username / password

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1  
You have to create a new user? – User Jun 19 '14 at 2:45
2  
@macdonjo: yes create new user with new password and grant privileges as mentioned above, it should work – Aditya P Bhatt Jun 19 '14 at 6:45
1  
Upvoted to your answer. Thanks – VVB Feb 17 '15 at 7:35
1  
upvoted to your answer – Anitha Jun 8 '15 at 7:29
1  
Had to restart mysql after completing the above steps for this to work for me. – tollbooth Sep 26 '15 at 18:20

You need to grant access to the user from any hostname.

This is how you add new privilege from phpmyadmin

Goto Privileges > Add a new User

enter image description here

Select Any Host for the desired username

enter image description here

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2  
Perfect! So basic usage of PhpMyAdmin I have never made before! – Gilberto Albino Jun 25 '14 at 14:54
    
this is the answer! great – diego matos - keke May 21 at 18:20

My error message was similar and said 'Host XXX is not allowed to connect to this MySQL server' even though I was using root. Here's how to make sure that root has the correct permissions.

My setup:

  • Ubuntu 14.04 LTS
  • MySQL v5.5.37

Solution

  1. Open up the file under 'etc/mysql/my.cnf'
  2. Check for:

    • port (by default this is 'port = 3306')
    • bind-address (by default this is 'bind-address = 127.0.0.1'; if you want to open to all then just comment out this line. For my example, I'll say the actual server is on 10.1.1.7)
  3. Now access the MySQL Database on your actual server (say your remote address is 123.123.123.123 at port 3306 as user 'root' and I want to change permissions on database 'dataentry'. Remember to change the IP Address, Port, and database name to your settings)

    mysql -u root -p
    Enter password: <enter password>
    mysql>GRANT ALL ON *.* to root@'123.123.123.123' IDENTIFIED BY 'put-your-password';
    mysql>FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
    mysql>exit
    
  4. sudo service mysql restart

  5. You should now be able to remote connect to your database. For example, I'm using MySQL Workbench and putting in 'Hostname:10.1.1.7', 'Port:3306', 'Username:root'
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1  
You can skip the use dataentry line (since most people won't have that database created). – Jedidja May 4 '15 at 20:24
2  
i was able to do this without restarting the mysql service at the end – Ryan Tuck Oct 22 '15 at 19:23
    
FLUSH PRIVILEGES should allow you to not need to restart. – Adam B Apr 9 at 1:04

The message *Host ''xxx.xx.xxx.xxx'' is not allowed to connect to this MySQL server is a reply from the MySQL server to the MySQL client. Notice how its returning the IP address and not the hostname.

If you're trying to connect with mysql -h<hostname> -u<somebody> -p and it returns this message with the IP address, then the MySQL server isn't able to do a reverse lookup on the client. This is critical because thats how it maps the MySQL client to the grants.

Make sure you can do an nslookup <mysqlclient> FROM the MySQL server. If that doesn't work, then there's no entry in the DNS server. Alternatively, you can put an entry in the MySQL server's HOSTS file (<ipaddress> <fullyqualifiedhostname> <hostname> <- The order here might matter).

An entry in my server's host file allowing a reverse lookup of the MySQL client solved this very problem.

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1  
"is a reply from the MySQL server to the MySQL client." Thank you, I was wondering where the error was coming from, my machine or the server. I have error "ERROR 1130 (HY000):" etc. – PJ Brunet May 31 '13 at 22:51

Just perform the following steps:

1) Connect to mysql

mysql -uroot -p

2) Create user

CREATE USER 'user'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

3) Grant permissions

 GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON \*.\* TO 'user'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION;

4) Flush priviledges

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
share|improve this answer
    
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1  
ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using passwoYES)Y – Gank Dec 1 '15 at 5:33

If you modify the grant tables manually (using INSERT, UPDATE, etc.), you should execute a FLUSH PRIVILEGES statement to tell the server to reload the grant tables.

PS: I wouldn't recommend to allow any host to connect for any user (especially not the root use). If you are using mysql for a client/server application, prefer a subnet address. If you are using mysql with a web server or application server, use specific IPs.

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1  
+1 I do agree with your recommendation, and the flush privileges might work if he made changes to the user table manually. (cleaned up old comments) – Yannick Motton Oct 13 '09 at 13:30

Well what you can do is just open mysql.cfg file and you have to change Bind-address to this

bind-address = 127.0.0.1

and then Restart mysql and you will able to connect that server to this.

Look this you can have idea form that.

this is real sol

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1  
This is related, but not the same problem. The error originally received indicates the client is connecting to the MySQL server successfully, but then failing authentication. If bind-address was set to 127.0.0.1, you would get a connection refused error instead. – axon Feb 6 '14 at 18:49
    
But this is address which will allow all the Host to get connected to the server na? – Krishna Feb 7 '14 at 5:10
    
But Granting all the permission to the user will not be wise option for that bcoz if u have client user and u are not allowed to create user with all permission then what would be the Solution.? – Krishna Feb 7 '14 at 5:11

I was also facing same issue, It resolved in 2 min for me i just white list ip through cpanel

Suppose you are trying to connect database of server B from server A. Go to Server B Cpanel->Remote MySQL-> enter Server A IP Address and That's it.

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All of the answers here didn't work in my case so I guest this may help other users in the future. This can also be a problem in our code, not just in MySQL alone.

If you are using VB.NET

Instead of this code:

 Dim server As String = My.Settings.DB_Server
 Dim username As String = My.Settings.DB_Username
 Dim password As String = My.Settings.DB_Password
 Dim database As String = My.Settings.DB_Database

 MysqlConn.ConnectionString = "server=" & server & ";" _
 & "user id=" & username & ";" _
 & "password=" & password & ";" _
 & "database=" & database

 MysqlConn = New MySqlConnection()

You need to move MysqlConn = New MySqlConnection() on the first line. So it would be like this

 MysqlConn = New MySqlConnection()

 Dim server As String = My.Settings.DB_Server
 Dim username As String = My.Settings.DB_Username
 Dim password As String = My.Settings.DB_Password
 Dim database As String = My.Settings.DB_Database

 MysqlConn.ConnectionString = "server=" & server & ";" _
 & "user id=" & username & ";" _
 & "password=" & password & ";" _
 & "database=" & database
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simple way is to login to phpmyadmin with root account , there goto mysql database and select user table , there edit root account and in host field add % wild card . and then through ssh flush privileges

 FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
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On the off chance that someone facing this issue is experiencing it from within SQLyog, this happened:

I had connected to the remote database (from within SQLyog) and worked for some hours. Afterwards I left the system for some minutes, then came back to continue my work - ERROR 1130 ! Nothing I tried worked; Restarting SQLyog didn't fix it. Then I restarted the system - it still didn't work.

So I tried connecting from the terminal - it worked. Then retried it on SQLyog ... and it worked. I can't explain it other than 'random computer quirkiness', but I think it might help someone.

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if you are trying to execute mysql query withouth defining connectionstring, you will get this error.

Probably you forgat to define connection string before execution. have you check this out? (sorry for bad english)

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protected by cimmanon Dec 2 '15 at 22:34

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