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Hi I'm testing the performance of a couple of sorting algorithms when sorting arrays between the size of 2500 to 25000. The two sorts I'm comparing is Gnome Sort and Quick Sort, from what I have read about these the Quick Sort should be a lot faster but the Gnome sort is beating it in every case.

The code for the QuickSort is:

void myQuickSort(Record sRecord[], int firstElement, int lastElement, bool (*funPoint)   (int,int))
{
int i = firstElement;
int j = lastElement;
int temp;
char tmpname[NAMESIZE];


int pivot = sRecord[(firstElement + lastElement) / 2].score;

bool (*myPoint)(int,int) = funPoint;

while (i <= j)
{
    while (sRecord[i].score < pivot)
    {
        i++;
    }
    while (sRecord[j].score > pivot)
    {
        j--;
    }

    if(compareResult(sRecord[j].score,sRecord[i].score) == false)
    {
        temp = sRecord[i].score;
        strcpy(tmpname,sRecord[i].name);

        sRecord[i].score = sRecord[j].score;
        strcpy(sRecord[i].name,sRecord[j].name);

        sRecord[j].score = temp;
        strcpy(sRecord[j].name, tmpname);

        i++;
        j--;
    }

    if(firstElement < j)
    {
        myQuickSort(sRecord, firstElement, j, compareResult);
    }
    if(i < lastElement)
    {
        myQuickSort(sRecord, i, lastElement , compareResult);
    }
}
}

and the GnomeSort is as follows:

void myGnomeSort(Record sRecord[], int size, bool (*funPoint)(int,int))
{
     int pos = size, temp;
     char tmpname[NAMESIZE];

     bool (*myPoint)(int,int) = funPoint;

     while(pos > 0)

     {

         if (pos == size || myPoint(sRecord[pos].score, sRecord[pos-1].score) == false)

             pos--;

         else
         {
             temp = sRecord[pos].score;
             strcpy(tmpname,sRecord[pos].name);

             sRecord[pos].score = sRecord[pos-1].score;
             strcpy(sRecord[pos].name,sRecord[pos-1].name);

             sRecord[pos-1].score = temp;
             strcpy(sRecord[pos-1].name, tmpname);

             pos--;

          }
     }  
}

Can anyone please shed some light onto why there is such a drastic increase when using quicksort (elements with 2.5k and almost 5 times longer).

Thanks for help

Edit: Code used to test is

Record smallRecord[25000];
populateArray(smallRecord, 25000);

int startTime = GetTickCount();

for(int times = 0; times < NUMOFTIMES; times++)
{
    populateArray(smallRecord, 25000);
    myGnomeSort(smallRecord, 25000, compareResult);
    cout << times << endl;
}

int endTime = GetTickCount();
float timeMS = ((float) (endTime - startTime)) / 1000;

cout << "Time taken: " << timeMS << endl;

the populate array function just fills the array with random numbers

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1  
Show us the code you're using to test them. –  NPE Mar 24 '13 at 15:12
1  
You haven't implemented gnome sort correctly. See here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnome_sort –  john Mar 24 '13 at 15:22
1  
In your Gnome thing, both branches decrement pos, so you only ever get one traversal. When swapping, you should increment pos. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 24 '13 at 15:24
2  
Tell us about generation of random data. Quicksort shows worst case for partially sorted data. –  SChepurin Mar 24 '13 at 15:24
1  
@SChepurin is correct. Usually one shuffles the input data before quicksorting it to avoid n^2 performance. –  angelatlarge Mar 24 '13 at 16:16

1 Answer 1

Actually Quick Sort has a complexity of O(N^2), and it is O(N * logN) in average, not in worst case. So using quick sort is not encouraged because there will always exist such data on which it will work O(N^2)

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2  
Randomized quicksort (where the pivot is chosen at random) has expected runtime O(n log n) with extremely high probability - it's not at all the case that use of quicksort is discouraged. –  templatetypedef Mar 24 '13 at 20:46

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