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Problem statement (for an educational purpose):
-Implement method printContainer which works for STL containers vector, stack, queue and deque.

I made a solution, but I don`t like it due to excessive amount of code.
What I did to solve the problem:
1. Designed generic function which expects uniform interface from containers for operations: get value of last element and erase that element from the container

template <typename T>
void printContainer(T container)
{
    cout << " * * * * * * * * * * " << endl;
    cout << " operator printContainer(T container). Stack, queue, priority queue" 
         << endl;
    cout << typeid(container).name() << endl;

    while (!container.empty())
    {
            cout << top(container) << "    ";
            pop(container);
    }
    cout << endl;
    cout << " * * * * * * * * * * * " << endl;
}

For each container I implemented functions that allows to provide uniform interface (I want to refactor the following code snippet):

template <typename T>
typename vector<T>::value_type top(const vector<T>& v)
{
    return v.back();
}
template <typename T, typename Base>
typename stack<T, Base>::value_type top(const stack<T, Base>& s)
{
    return s.top();
}

template <typename T, typename Base>
typename queue<T, Base>::value_type top(const queue<T, Base>& q)
{
    return q.front();
}

template <typename T, typename Base>
typename priority_queue<T, Base>::value_type top(const priority_queue<T, 
                                                              Base>& pq)
{
    return pq.top();
}

template <typename T>
void pop(vector<T>& v)
{
    return v.pop_back();
}

template <typename T, typename Base>
void pop(stack<T, Base>& s)
{
    return s.pop();
}

template <typename T, typename Base>
void pop(queue<T, Base>& q)
{
    return q.pop();
}

template <typename T, typename Base>
void pop(priority_queue<T,Base>& pq)
{
    return pq.pop();
}

I wan`t to replace it with something like this:

template <typename T, typename Base, template<typename T, class Base, 
class ALL = std::allocator<T>> class container>
typename container<T,Base>::value_type top(container<T,Base>& c)
{
    if (typeid(container).name == typeid(vector<T,Base>))
        return c.back();
    if (typeid(container).name == typeid(queue<T,Base>))
        return c.front();
    else
        return c.top();
}

template <typename T, typename Base, template<typename T, class Base, 
class ALL = std::allocator<T>> class container>
typename container<T,Base>::value_type pop(container<T,Base>& c)
{
    if (typeid(container).name == typeid(vector<T,Base>))
        c.pop_back();
    else
        return c.pop();
}

but it doesn`t work, I get errors like :

Error   1   error C2784: 'container<T,Base>::value_type top(container<T,Base> &)' : could not deduce template argument for 'container<T,Base> &' from 'std::stack<_Ty>'

Question:
that adjacements should I made in template template paramter to sort out errors, maybe there is something that I overlooked or exist logical errors.
Any way, any usefull information is welcomed.
Thanks in advance!

UPDATE:

// that is how I am trying to invoke the function

int arr[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0};
    stack<int> s(deque<int>(arr, arr + sizeof(arr) / sizeof(arr[0])));;
    queue<int> q(deque<int>(arr, arr + sizeof(arr) / sizeof(arr[0])));
    priority_queue<int> pq(arr, arr + sizeof(arr) / sizeof(arr[0]));
    printContainer(s);
    printContainer(q);
    printContainer(pq);
share|improve this question
    
In the last example, shouldn't the second function template be named pop() instead of top()? –  Andy Prowl Mar 24 '13 at 15:22
    
yes, that`s right, thank you - it should be pop() –  spin_eight Mar 24 '13 at 15:23
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This solution:

template <typename T, typename Base, template<typename T, class Base, 
class ALL = std::allocator<T>> class container>
typename container<T,Base>::value_type top(container<T,Base>& c)
{
    if (typeid(container).name == typeid(vector<T,Base>))
        return c.back();
    if (typeid(container).name == typeid(queue<T,Base>))
        return c.front();
    else
        return c.top();
}

Won't work, because if() realizes a run-time selection, which means that the code of all branches must compile, even though exactly only one of them evaluates to true, and function top() is not provided by all containers (e.g. vector).

Consider this simpler example for an explanation:

struct X { void foo() { } };
struct Y { void bar() { } };

template<bool b, typename T>
void f(T t)
{
    if (b)
    {
        t.foo();
    }
    else
    {
        t.bar();
    }
}

int main()
{
    X x;
    f<true>(x); // ERROR! bar() is not a member function of X 

    Y y;
    f<false>(y); // ERROR! foo() is not a member function of Y
}

Here, I am passing a boolean template argument, which is known at compile-time, to function f(). I am passing true if the input is of type X, and therefore supports a member function called foo(); and I am passing false if the input is of type Y, and therefore supports a member function called bar().

Even though the selection works on a boolean value which is known at compile-time, the statement itself is executed at run-time. The compiler will first have to compile the whole function, including the false branch of the if statement.

What you are looking for is some kind of static if construct, which is unfortunately not available in C++.

The traditional solution here is based on overloading, and looks in fact like the one you provided originally.

share|improve this answer
    
in if statement I meant operator==, I shall edit my code –  spin_eight Mar 24 '13 at 15:35
    
@spin_eight: Yes, I've noticed. But that doesn't really matter here, the problem is deeper than that (see the answer for a clarification) –  Andy Prowl Mar 24 '13 at 15:36
    
I am looking through it right now, I need some time to understand ideas mentioned there. –  spin_eight Mar 24 '13 at 15:39
    
"which means that the code of all branches must compile" - I thought that they are compiled when templates are instantiated. "and function top() is not provided by all containers (e.g. vector)" - what is why I implemented top(vector). Sorry I don`t get from you answer why idea with template template argument can`t be applied to my task –  spin_eight Mar 24 '13 at 15:54
    
@spin_eight: Indeed they are compiled when templates are instantiated, but all branches of your if statements are compiled. This is what the example in my answer tried to clarify. You can't say "if it is a vector invoke this function, otherwise invoke this other function", because when you pass a vector, the compiler will have to compile both the "if it is a vector" branch and the "otherwise" branch, and one of the two will not compile. –  Andy Prowl Mar 24 '13 at 17:01
show 2 more comments

I'd come at it the other way around. I'd write a generic function that uses iterators:

template <class Iter>
void show_contents(Iter first, Iter last) {
    // whatever
}

then a generic function that takes containers:

template <class Container>
void show_container(const Container& c) {
    show_contents(c.begin(), c.end());
}

then a hack to get at the container that underlies a queue or a stack:

template <class C>
struct hack : public C {
    hack(const C& cc) : C(cc) { }
    typename C::Container::const_iterator begin() const {
        return this->c.begin();
    }

    typename C::Container::const_iterator end() const {
        return this->c.end();
    }
};

then define specializations to create these objects and show their contents:

template <class T>
void show_container(const stack<T>& s) {
    hack<stack<T>> hack(s);
    show_contents(hack.begin(), hack.end());
}

template <class T>
void show_container(const queue<T>& q) {
    hack<stack<T>> hack(q);
    show_contents(hack.begin(), hack.end());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you , I liked the idea(work with underlying containers and use iterators they provide) very much. Initially I intended to use underlying containers, not adapters, because that will allow to deal with only 3 containers(list, vector, deque). If I decided to work with adapters there will be much more work to do. But I rejected my idea as I didn`t know how to get iterators for a underlying container. Now I am trying to implement you variant, but I can`t make struct hack work - I am getting the error: Error 1 error C2039: 'const_iterator' : is not a member of 'std::stack<_Ty>' –  spin_eight Mar 24 '13 at 23:19
    
@spin_eight - sorry. It should be typename C::Container::const_iterator. Fixed. –  Pete Becker Mar 25 '13 at 12:27
    
@"Pete Becker" Yes, that helped, thank you for the good idea and the proper implementation. –  spin_eight Mar 25 '13 at 19:28
    
it works only for base container and doesn`t work with adapters! –  spin_eight Mar 26 '13 at 0:15
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While Andy's answer is already a good one, I'd like to add one improvement about your implementation. You could improve it to support more container specializations, as your overloads don't allow all the template parameters that the STL containers have to be non-default. For example, look at your code:

template <typename T>
typename vector<T>::value_type top(const vector<T>& v)
{
    return v.back();
}

and now compare it with the definition of std::vector. The class template has two parameters, namely std::vector<T,Allocator=std::allocator<T>>. You overload only accepts those std::vectors where the second parameter is std::allocator<T>.

While you could manually add more parameters to your code, there is a better alternative: Variadic templates. You can use the following code for a truly generic version for all std::vectors:

template <typename... Ts>
typename vector<Ts...>::value_type top(const vector<Ts...>& v)
{
    return v.back();
}

and, of course, you can use the same technique for all other containers and don't need to worry about the exact number of template parameters they have. Some containers even have up to five template parameters, so this can be quite annoying if you don't use variadic templates.

One caveat: Some older compilers might not like the variadic version, you'll have to manually iterate all parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for information. "as your overloads don't allow all the template parameters that the STL containers have to be non-default" - I think that will be enough one template parameter to make my template function work for all base containers(list, vector, deque) because second parameter which is allocator isn`t used in my function at all that means that my function doesn`t need to deduce it from template. Also to check my guess I took implementation of allocator(josuttis.com/libbook/memory/myalloc.hpp.html) and my function work for instance for vector with that allocator –  spin_eight Mar 24 '13 at 23:07
    
I mean that ommiting 2-nd template parameter which is allocator doesn`t limits the scope of my function usage, this isn`t the case although there are other factors that limit it. –  spin_eight Mar 24 '13 at 23:10
    
@spin_eight: Your overload of std::vector<T> would not match std::vector<T,MyAlloc<T>> - if it does, it's a serious compiler bug. At least, this is how I'm reading your comments. If you just say you don't need it, OK. –  Daniel Frey Mar 24 '13 at 23:32
    
Yes it matches, if it is a bug then that kind of behaviour should contradict to a C++ standart, could you please point me to the contradiction. –  spin_eight Mar 25 '13 at 0:58
    
@"Daniel Frey" After some experiments with my code I came to conclusion that you are right. Thank you for pointing to the issue with ommited 2-nd template parameter, now I understand how it all works and issues that can appear. –  spin_eight Mar 25 '13 at 2:07
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