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what I'm trying to do is so simple yet my brain refuses to function today!

<div id="outer">
    <div class="inner">TEXT 1</div>
    <div class="inner">TEXT 2</div>
    <div class="inner">TEXT 3</div>
</div>

Should appear visually like this:

|---------------------------------------------------|
|    TEXT 1          TEXT 2            TEXT 3       |
|---------------------------------------------------|

Where .outer is 100% width and each of the text elements are equally spaced within. ps. I can use spans for the inner elements if this is easier.

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Have you tried something in CSS too? –  hjpotter92 Mar 24 '13 at 15:48

2 Answers 2

#outer {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 100%;
}
.inner {
    float: left;
    width: 30%;
    margin: 5px;
    background-color: red;
}

Some properties are obviously to mark them clearly on this fiddle.

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I've tried loads but wanted to try and avoid specifying widths if possible ... so that if I add 5 elements I don't have to alter the width, it can just figure it out. –  Paul Smith Mar 24 '13 at 15:52
1  
@PaulSmith: There is absolutely no possible way to get three completely even-width boxes without specifying a width. Even if you displayed them as table cells, those still adjust the width automatically based on the content inside them and would not result in even widths. –  animuson Mar 24 '13 at 15:56

just apply this css

#outer{
   width:100%;
   display:inline-block;
   border:1px solid #CCC;
}
.inner{
    float:left;
    width:29%;
    text-align:Center;
    border:1px solid green;
}

see this fiddle

Also, note that, the sum of the width of the individual inner divs must be less that the total width of the outer, then only they would appear floated left

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