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I have a very big plain text file with all kinds of languages, such as English, Japanese, Chinese... I want to get the number of lines containing Chinese characters.

I think this can be done using grep and wc -l, but how can I actually do this job?

cat filename | grep -P "[\x{4e00}-\x{9fcc}]" | wc -l

This command does not work, and has this error message:

.grep: character value in \x{...} sequence is too large.

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What kind of grep do you use (grep -V)? –  nwellnhof Mar 24 '13 at 16:49
    
You don't have to cat into GREP. You can just use grep -opt "pattern" filename. Not super helpful, I know. but a tweak. –  FrankieTheKneeMan Mar 24 '13 at 20:24

2 Answers 2

If you don't mind using Python, you can observe what characters are used in the file with the help of the unicodedata module. Example with nāgarī input and Python 3:

>>> import unicodedata
>>> word = "ब्र॑ह्मन्"
>>> len(word)
9
>>> for char in word:
...     unicodedata.name(char)
... 
'DEVANAGARI LETTER BA'
'DEVANAGARI SIGN VIRAMA'
'DEVANAGARI LETTER RA'
'DEVANAGARI STRESS SIGN UDATTA'
'DEVANAGARI LETTER HA'
'DEVANAGARI SIGN VIRAMA'
'DEVANAGARI LETTER MA'
'DEVANAGARI LETTER NA'
'DEVANAGARI SIGN VIRAMA'

Of course, you first need to look for the unicode names of the glyphs used in each script. A table of the unicode chars can be found here. Some specific tables, for each language, are given on the same website.

Once you've defined the range of characters you want to catch, the rest is pretty easy:

all_chars = ['ब', '्', 'र', '॑', 'ह', '्','म', 'न', '्']

i = 0
with open('thefile') as f:
    for line in f.readline():
        i += 1
        for char in all_chars:
            if char in line:
                print("char %s found in line %s" % (char, i))
                continue
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Since you're specifying the -P option, you're probably using GNU grep. The error message seems to come from PCRE, the Perl-compatible regular expression library. So either your version of PCRE isn't Perl-compatible enough or GNU grep doesn't use PCRE's Unicode features.

I'd simply try to run Perl directly:

perl -ne 'print if /[\x{4e00}-\x{9fcc}]/' filename | wc -l

Edit: I could test this on a Linux system today, and I found that it's probably caused by this bug in grep (PCRE_UTF8 isn't set for UTF-8 locales) which has been fixed in this commit. There's no official release with the fix yet but it should be included in the next release (2.15).

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