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In VHDL, in a process all steps will be executed sequentially, but I wonder how an FPGA can execute steps sequentially. I am very confused about how sequential assignments, functions and similar are being generated in an FPGA, so can anyone throw some light on this topic?

process(d, clk)  
begin    
  if(rising_edge(clk)) then  
    q <= d;  
  else
    q <= q;  
  end if;    
end process;

This is just code for a simple D-Latch, but how will this be implemented in an FPGA?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is not "executed" sequentially as such - but the synthesizer interprets the code sequentially, and creates the hardware design to fit such an interpretation.

For instance, if you assign a value to a signal twice during a clocked process, the first assignment is simply ignored, while the second takes effect (remember that a signal is only assigned at the end of a process statement, not immediately):

signal a : UNSIGNED(3 downto 0) := (others => '0');

(...)

process(clk)
begin
  if(rising_edge(clk)) then
    a <= a - 1;
    a <= a + 1;
  end if;
end process;

The above process will always increment a by 1. Similarly, if you have the second assignment inside an if statement, the synthesizer will simply create two paths for a - a decrement for when the if statement is not fullfilled, and an increment for when it is.

If you use variables, the idea is the same - although intermediate values are used, as variables take on their new value immediately.

But it all boils down to that the synthesizer does all the "magic" of interpreting your process in a sequential way, then generating hardware that does what you have described.

Your example basically describes a d-flip-flop (the Xilinx FPGA tools iirc distinguish latches and flip-flops in that flip-flops are edge-sensitive, and latches are level-sensitive), although in a different way than typically recommended.

You can basically write the same code as:

process(clk)
begin
  if(rising_edge(clk)) then
    q <= d;
  end if;
end process;

It will automatically keep its value in the other cases. This will be implemented as a flip-flop inside the FPGA. Most FPGAs consist of blocks of look-up tables and flip-flops, to which quite a lot of different hardware can be mapped. The above code will simply by-pass the look-up table, and just use the flip-flop of one of the blocks.

You can learn more about the internal workings by having a look at the datasheet for your particular FPGA. For Spartan3-series FPGAs for instance, have a look at page 24 of the Xilinx Spartan3 FPGA Family Data Sheet

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Thank you so much But i think that signals are just like wires connecting different outputs or inputs and variables are like memory elements.............is this concept of mine is true or not??????? –  Karan Shah Mar 25 '13 at 13:51
    
Signals can be likened to wires, yes. But when you assign a value to a signal in a clocked process, the synthesizer infers a flip-flop between the input signal and the output signal. Most tools should have a feature where you can see a generated RTL diagram of your code - experiment a bit with that, and have a look at how your code actually looks after being synthesized. –  sonicwave Mar 25 '13 at 14:24
    
Thanks a lot....:) –  Karan Shah Mar 25 '13 at 15:19

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