Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using the DotNetZip library to rename a file within a zip archive.

Here is the code I am using:

void RenameFile(string existingArchive, string oldName, string newName)
{
    using (ZipFile zip = ZipFile.Read(existingArchive))
    {
        ZipEntry targetFile = zip.Entries.FirstOrDefault(f =>
            f.FileName.ToLower() == oldName.ToLower());

        //targetFile is not null.

        targetFile.FileName = newName;
        zip.Save();
    }
}

The issue I'm having is that after the rename operation, the zip is corrupted. When I browse it using WinRAR, I have a duplicate entry for the file I renamed (both of the entries are identical, with the new name). When I try to extract it, WinRAR throws a CRC error on the two identical entries.

I've tried saving to a different filename, but without luck.

I am using v1.9.1.8 of the library (the reduced version).

Update:

Removing one of the duplicate entries after renaming seems to work and has no visible side effects. Still, a less hacky approach would be welcome.

void RenameFile(string existingArchive, string oldName, string newName)
{
    using (ZipFile zip = ZipFile.Read(existingArchive))
    {
        ZipEntry targetFile = zip.Entries.FirstOrDefault(f =>
            f.FileName.ToLower() == oldName.ToLower());

        //targetFile is not null.

        targetFile.FileName = newName;

        //if the file was duplicated, remove one of the duplicates:
        var dupFiles = zip.Where(f => f.FileName == newName).ToList();
        if (dupFiles.Count > 1)
        {
            zip.RemoveEntries(dupFiles.Skip(1).ToList());
        }

        zip.Save();
    }
}

Update 2:

As the answers suggest the source file might be the problem, I've uploaded a sample zip file (24kb) here

This is the code I am using to verify it suffers from this issue:

using (ZipFile zip = ZipFile.Read("test.zip"))
{
    ZipEntry entry = zip.Entries.FirstOrDefault(e => Path.GetFileName(e.FileName) == "test.max");
    entry.FileName = Path.Combine(Path.GetDirectoryName(entry.FileName), "newname.max");
    zip.Save(@"test2.zip");
}
share|improve this question
1  
Looks like a bug in the library, if you ask me. –  Nolonar Mar 27 '13 at 10:34
    
I agree with @Nolonar. I think change is not committed properly. It is changed inside but CRC, Hash or something like that is not updated for zip file, that's why WinRAR is saying that zip is corrupted. Look at documentation and see what it says. –  Faisal Hafeez Mar 27 '13 at 10:37
    
Try use zip.EntriesSorted instead of zip.Entries. –  Vladimir Frolov Mar 27 '13 at 10:45
    
@VladimirFrolov Tried, but doesn't seem to make a difference. Thanks. –  Rotem Mar 27 '13 at 14:15
    
@Rotem It was a bug. I updated my post and filed an issue. –  Virtlink Mar 28 '13 at 22:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

I can't reproduce your problem with a random ZIP file I had lying around and the latest stable 1.9.1.8 Reduced precompiled binary or the latest Reduced source code. The code you posted results in a ZIP archive I can successfully open and extract files from using both Windows Explorer and 7zip (I don't have WinRAR).

Note that both Anders Gustafsson's approach and your approach use the same ZipFile's internal data structures, so there should be no difference and your code should just work.

public ZipEntry this[String fileName]
{
    get
    {
        if (_entries.ContainsKey(fileName))
            return _entries[fileName];
        return null;
    }
}

public ICollection<ZipEntry> Entries
{
    get { return _entries.Values; }
}

Maybe it's an issue with the source ZIP file you're using, or with the full path of that ZIP (too long?), or the old and new filenames you chose? Or perhaps you have another application open that somehow prevents DotNetZip from removing the old entry?


Update: problem found!

The problem was indeed unique to your ZIP file, but actually it is a bug in DotNetZip.

When the library reads file entries from the ZIP file, it takes the filename exactly as specified by the ZIP file and stores it in the Filename property of the ZipEntry, and then stores this filename as the key in the _entries dictionary. In your case, the Filename property of your file entry has the following value:

C:\Users\rotem\Documents\3dsmax\scenes\test.max

Then, when you change the value of the Filename property, DotNetZip removes the current entry from _entries and re-adds the entry with the new filename.

To remove the current entry, it normalizes the current filename and removes the entry with that filename from _entries. So, it is trying to remove an entry with this normalized filename as the key:

Users/rotem/Documents/3dsmax/scenes/test.max

Of course, there is no key in _entries with that filename. The entry that it meant to remove has a C:\ prefix and all backward slashes. So, the old entry doesn't get removed.

But DotNetZip doesn't notice this and continues. It sets the entry's Filename to the normalized new filename:

Users/rotem/Documents/3dsmax/scenes/newname.max

And then re-adds the entry to the _entries dictionary. Now there are two entries for the same file entry: one with the normalized new filename, and one with the unnormalized old filename. And that's where all your problems come from.

I recommend that DotNetZip asserts that it really removed exactly one entry on renaming. And it should normalize any filename that is assigned to the ZipEntry.Filename property or its backing field, or that is used as a key in _entries.


Issue #16130 has been created on the DotNetZip CodePlex page.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not unreasonable that the source file is to blame, but in what was is it invalid? I've edited my question to include a small sample source file. –  Rotem Mar 28 '13 at 14:35
    
Great job! Thanks for the detailed explanation and for opening an issue :) For now my hack will have to do as I don't have much control of the creation of the source file. –  Rotem Mar 29 '13 at 6:59

Your approach seems reasonable, so there might very well be a bug in the DotNetZip library.

BUT If you look at the C# Examples on the DotNetZip CodePlex site, section Update a zip archive, you'll see that the recommended (?) approach for renaming an existing entry in an archive is:

zip[oldName].FileName = newName;

This means that your method would change to this:

void RenameFile(string existingArchive, string oldName, string newName)
{
    using (ZipFile zip = ZipFile.Read(existingArchive))
    {
        zip[oldName].FileName = newName;
        zip.Save();
    }
}

As far as I can tell from my tests, the above approach works as intended, and the indexer property this[string fileName] appears to make a case-insensitive file name match

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, using the filename indexer doesn't seem to be working for me (returns null). I'll try to see why that is. –  Rotem Mar 27 '13 at 14:16
1  
@Rotem It returns null because you are looking for a filename such as C:\Users\myfile.txt, but DotNetZip is looking for an entry with a filename such as Users/myfile.txt, which it then can't find. It is caused by the same issue that I found (normalization). –  Virtlink Mar 28 '13 at 22:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.