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I want to make a function that, given character string containing (unsigned) integer values separated by spaces, gives me the number of values in the string:

int conta_coords(char *args) {
  char *pal;
  int k=0;
  pal = strtok (args," ");
  while (pal != NULL)
  {
      k++;
      pal =strtok (NULL," ");
  }
  return k;
}

This function won't give me the right number. Can anyone help me?

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Could you provide the call? –  md5 Mar 24 '13 at 18:16
    
In addition to what @Kirilenko requested, what value are you passing as args and what is your function returning? –  adamdunson Mar 24 '13 at 18:21

2 Answers 2

In what way won't it give you the correct number? Here's your code embedded into an SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example).

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

extern int conta_coords(char *str);

int conta_coords(char *args) {
  char *pal;
  int k=0;
  pal = strtok (args," ");
  while (pal != NULL)
  {
  k++;
      pal =strtok (NULL," ");
  }
  return k;
}

int main(void)
{
    char data[] = "1 23 456 7890 12345";
    printf("Data: %s\n", data);
    printf("Number: %d\n", conta_coords(data));
    printf("Data split: %s\n", data);
    return 0;
}

Output:

$ ./cntnum
Data: 1 23 456 7890 12345
Number: 5
Data split: 1
$ 

That looks correct to me. Note, though, that the original string has been chopped to pieces. Also, if I had passed a read-only string (string literal), I might have gotten different results, because strtok() modifies the data it works on, but string literals aren't always modifiable (and you may get a core dump out of trying to modify it). For example:

    printf("Number: %d\n", conta_coords("   1     23    45   67    99    "));

This gives me a 'bus error' (and would give a core dump if they weren't disabled).

Here's an alternative implementation that works on constant strings by not modifying the searched string at all, using the much-underrated C89 standard functions strspn() and strcspn():

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

extern int conta_coords(const char *str);

int conta_coords(const char *str)
{
    const char  digits[] = "0123456789";
    const char *ptr = str;
    int   k = 0;
    int   n = strcspn(ptr, digits);
    while (ptr[n] != '\0')
    {
        ptr += n;
        n = strspn(ptr, digits);
        if (n > 0)
            k++;
        ptr += n;
        n = strcspn(ptr, digits);
    }
    return k;
}

int main(void)
{
    char data[] = "1 23 456 7890 12345";
    printf("Data: %s\n", data);
    printf("Number: %d\n", conta_coords(data));
    printf("Data unsplit: %s\n", data);
    printf("Number: %d\n", conta_coords("   1     23    45   67    99    "));
    return 0;
}

Output:

Data: 1 23 456 7890 12345
Number: 5
Data unsplit: 1 23 456 7890 12345
Number: 5

Note that one legitimate criticism of this is that it does not demand that the integers are separated by blanks (so a more accurate characterization of it is 'count how many sequences of one or more contiguous digits (separated by one or more non-digits) appear in the given string'). But the original code can also be criticized on similar grounds: it counts the number of sequences of consecutive non-blanks, separated by one or more blanks, appear in the given string. You can refine the implementation, but be wary of how you deal with erroneously formatted data and report the problems.

share|improve this answer

Something like that:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <ctype.h>

bool is_stringified_num(const char *str, const size_t size)
{
    int n = 0;
    while(n < size && isdigit(str[n++]));

    return n == size;
}

int str_numbers_count(char *str)
{
    int numbers_count = 0;
    char *prev_pos = str;
    char *pos = strchr(str, ' ');

    while(pos)
    {
        if (is_stringified_num(prev_pos, pos - prev_pos)) ++numbers_count ;
        prev_pos = ++pos;
        pos = strchr(pos, ' ');
    }

    if (is_stringified_num(prev_pos, strlen(str) - (prev_pos - str))) ++numbers_count ;

    return numbers_count ;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char str[] = "1 23 456 7890 12345";
    printf("%s contains %d numbers\n", str, str_numbers_count(str));

    return 0;
}

Ideone compiles well and outputs:

1 23 456 7890 12345 contains 5 numbers
share|improve this answer
    
Why not add the test code? It doesn't need to be complex or thorough; just enough to show it does what you expect on some sample data. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 24 '13 at 18:48
    
@JonathanLeffler, sure I will –  maverik Mar 24 '13 at 19:05

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