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I have the following equation and I have to write it in R. enter image description here

The main challenge that I am facing with this coding is that for each i and for each k, I need a sum of combinations (binomial terms in the numerator). Here min{(n-k),Mi} can be 0 for some i and k, specially when k=n. Most importantly a loop cannot be started from 0, but I need it!

For your kind consideration, here is my code and the data (d1). You will see that I need to start the loop from 0 after the line sum<-0, which is my main problem. Would you please see the issue and correct the code? What should I do with the loop that needs to be started from 0?

n<-4

n^2

id<-1:16

r<-c(1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,0,1,0,1,1,1,1,1)

tr<-rep(0,n^2)
for(i in 1:n^2){
tr[i]<-ifelse(r[i]==1,rexp(1,1/1),0)
}

t0<-rep(0,n^2)
for(i in 1:n^2){
t0[i]<-ifelse(r[i]==0,rexp(1,1/1.5),0)
}

#Total number of subjects who cannot get B1:

M<-sum(r==0)    #If there were cenoring then M<-sum(r==0 & tr>cenc)

d<-data.frame(id,r,t0,tr)

d1<-d[tr>0,]
d1

d1<-d1[order(d1$tr),]
d1

d1$rank<-1:length(d1$tr)
d1


###Calculating the probability of getting B1 for each subject with r[i]=1:

d1$prob<-rep(0,length(d1$tr))
for(i in 1:length(d1$tr)){  #loop i begins
Mi<-sum(d1$tr[i]>t0[t0>0])
for(k in 1:n){  #loop k begins
sum<-0
for(m in 0:min(n-k,Mi)){    #loop m begins
sum<-sum+choose(Mi,m)*choose(n^2-i-Mi,n-k-m)
}   #loop m ends.
d1$prob[i]<-d1$prob[i]+choose(i-1,k-1)*sum/choose(n^2,n)
}   #loop k ends.
}   #loop i ends.
d1$prob<-d1$prob*1/n
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean a loop can't be started from zero? for( k in 0 :5 ) print(k) gives [1] 0 [1] 1 [1] 2 [1] 3 [1] 4 [1] 5 –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 24 '13 at 18:52
    
Actually I tried to mean it cannot do things like the one in the example: 'op<-rep(0,3) for(o in 0:2){ op[o]<-choose(3,o) } op' –  Blain Waan Mar 24 '13 at 18:55
2  
You can do like this ` op<-rep(0,3); for(o in 0:2){ op[o+1]<-choose(3,o) } ; op choose(3,1) –  Hemmo Mar 24 '13 at 19:13
1  
what you mean is that you can't index vectors from zero (you actually can, using the Oarray package, but you should probably just use op <- rep(0,3) for (o in 0:2) { op[o+1] <- choose(3,o) }; op) –  Ben Bolker Mar 24 '13 at 19:14
2  
Or you could just use op<-choose(3,0:2). –  Hemmo Mar 24 '13 at 19:14
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closed as too localized by Ari B. Friedman, mnel, Vishal, Javier, Graviton Mar 25 '13 at 4:02

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't see what is the problem in your original code? You can't index vectors beginning from zero, but it has nothing to do with the range of iterator in loops. Anyway, this should give you same answer but avoids the innermost loop:

d1$prob<-rep(0,length(d1$tr))
for(i in 1:length(d1$tr)){  #loop i begins
  Mi<-sum(d1$tr[i]>t0[t0>0])
  for(k in 1:n){  #loop k begins
    # function choose is vectorized, so you can compute all 
    # binomial terms at once given k
    SUM<-sum(choose(Mi,0:min(n-k,Mi))*choose(n^2-i-Mi,n-k-(0:min(n-k,Mi))))
    d1$prob[i]<-d1$prob[i]+choose(i-1,k-1)*SUM
  }   #loop k ends.
}   #loop i ends.
d1$prob<-(d1$prob/choose(n^2,n))*1/n 
#as choose(n^2,n) does not depend on i nor k, 
#you can make the division after the loops for all elements at once
share|improve this answer
    
Oh thank you for this Hemmo. –  Blain Waan Mar 25 '13 at 19:18
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