Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I am reading "Thinking in Java" and have a doubt. In the chapter "reusing classes", section "final and private", it says that a private method cannot be overridden. However, I tried it on the machine. It actually could be overridden.

Here is the code

class Amphibian {
     private void print() { System.out.println("in Amphibian"); }
}

public class Frog extends Amphibian {
     public void print( System.out.println("in Frog"); }

     public static void main(String[] args) {
          Frog f = new Frog();
          f.print();
     }
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by FDinoff, CloudyMarble, Reno, Soner Gönül, Raghunandan Jun 10 '13 at 6:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Your code doesn't actually compile. –  millimoose Mar 24 '13 at 18:55
    
It compiles on my machine. –  NoviceCai Mar 24 '13 at 19:12
    
Then the code "on your machine" isn't identical to the code in your question, because that code is glaringly broken. –  millimoose Mar 24 '13 at 19:17
    
I have nominated this question for reopening. The question it was (somehow) marked as a duplicate of is a completely different question... I'm not sure how 5 people managed to agree this was a duplicate of that. –  Jason C Nov 4 '13 at 7:11
add comment

3 Answers

You didn't override it, you just hid it with a new method with the same name.

If you didn't create a new print() method, your Frog class wouldn't have one.

share|improve this answer
1  
exactly, use the @Override annotation, you will get an error :) –  Little Child Mar 24 '13 at 18:53
    
ok. Thanks. So without @override, it is just hide the definition instead of overriding it. –  NoviceCai Mar 24 '13 at 18:54
    
Yes, exactly. @Override will check if you are actually overriding an inherited method. If you are making a typo or if there isn't any method you are overriding, it will flag that as an error –  Little Child Mar 24 '13 at 18:56
    
Ok I got this error now: –  NoviceCai Mar 24 '13 at 18:57
1  
I got it! Thanks. The private method is not seen from derived class. So it does not make sense to override a private method. –  NoviceCai Mar 24 '13 at 19:20
show 4 more comments

To illustrate the difference between overriding and hiding, consider this:

class Amphibian {
    private void print() { System.out.println("in Amphibian"); }
    public void callPrint() {
        /* 
         * This will DIRECTLY call Amphibian.print(), regardless of whether the
         * current object is an instance of Amphibian or Frog, and whether the
         * latter hides the method or not.
         */
        print(); // this call is bound early
    }
}

class Frog extends Amphibian {
    public void print() { System.out.println("in Frog"); }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Frog f = new Frog();
        f.callPrint(); // => in Amphibian

        // this call is bound late
        f.print(); // => in Frog
    }
}

The "overriding" (i.e. hiding) method doesn't get called, the one in the parent class does. Which means it's not really an override.

share|improve this answer
    
this is a little trick here. If you make print in Amphibian private, you cannot override it. However, if you make it public, no matter whether you put @Override, it will always get overridden in Frog. –  NoviceCai Mar 24 '13 at 19:05
    
I tried your code by make private to public, and put or not put @Override in front of print in Frog. I got the same result. –  NoviceCai Mar 24 '13 at 19:06
1  
@NoviceCai There's no trick involved, that's how Java works. @Override doesn't change the semantics of the code, it merely makes the Java compiler give you an error if the annotated method isn't overriding anything. The point of the annotation is to catch errors, not to make a method override one in the base class. Any virtual method can and will be overriden by another method with a compatible signature in a child class. IIRC, in Java, every non-private method is virtual, regardless of how any other method in the hierarchy is annotated. –  millimoose Mar 24 '13 at 19:21
    
@NoviceCai When I change private void print() to public void print() in the above sample, the output changes to "in Frog", so I'm not sure how you're getting "the same result". (Unless you're changing the method in Frog which is missing the point.) –  millimoose Mar 24 '13 at 19:22
    
@NoviceCai For further reading you might look into "virtual method tables" (which is how overriding is implemented in Java), and the concepts of "late binding" and "early binding". The explanation why my code sample behaves how it does is because print() in callPrint() is bound early to the nonvirtual implementation of Ambhibian.print(). If you change Amphibian.print() to public, it becomes a virtual method, and will therefore be bound late, which means an overriding implementation will be called if there is any in the current instance. –  millimoose Mar 24 '13 at 19:26
show 3 more comments

You can simply write a private method in subclass but it will not be overridden. But it still follows access modifier rules which are used in overriding

If you make wider access modifier(default, protected, public) in superclass method when subclass's method is private then compiler shows errors. It follows overriding rule but doesn't override actually.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.