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I have a data frame containing three variables (ACC and Type and ID), where ACC refers to the accuracy of the decision, the Type refers to 30 different decision types which are repeated 15 times for each decision type over the participants and the ID refers to the participants. It looks like this:

ID     ACC     Type
1       1       1
1       0       3   
1       1      10
etc...
2       1       5
2       0      13
2       0      11
etc...

My aim is to analyze the accuracy for each decision type among the participants, and merge the data into a data frame. Such as:

ID    ACC_Type1     ACC_Type2 […]  ACC_Type30
1       70             65             87
2       65             50             90
etc...

So far I was able to calculate by subsetting individually the decision types, however, I’m looking for a smarter way to avoid typing individually the decision type value:

library(data.table)
library(plyr)
dt <- data.table(d,key="Type")
dt_Type1<-data.frame (aggregate(ACC~ID,data=subset(dt,Type==1),mean))
dt_Type2<-data.frame (aggregate(ACC~ID,data=subset(dt,Type==2),mean))
[]
dt_Type30<-data.frame (aggregate(ACC~ID,data=subset(dt,Type==30),mean))

total <- merge(dt_Type1,dt_Type2 […] Type30,by="ID") 

Any help is appreciated!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Using Ananda's data, a data.table solution can be obtained as:

require(data.table)
dt <- data.table(mydf)
setkey(dt, "TYPE", "ID")
dt[, mean(ACC), by=key(dt)][, setattr(as.list(V1), 'names', 
                paste0("ACC", ID)), by=TYPE]
#    TYPE ACC1 ACC2 ACC3
# 1:    1  3.0  2.5  3.0
# 2:    2  1.5  2.0  3.0
# 3:    3  4.0  2.0  4.5
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1  
Vurrry nice. Didn't know this trick either.... –  Ananda Mahto Mar 24 '13 at 20:43
    
What's key(dt)? ;) –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 24 '13 at 20:44
    
@RicardoSaporta, updated. –  Arun Mar 24 '13 at 20:45
    
+1 very nice! You can also preserve the column names using list(paste0('ACC_', Type) = as.list(V1)) –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 24 '13 at 20:47
1  
eh, I can't actually +1 I'm out of votes. But you have my vote in spirit –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 24 '13 at 20:48

What you're doing with subsetting is overkill. A basic call to aggregate should suffice. Additionally, to get the output you desire, you'll need to use reshape. Here's an example:

Sample data:

set.seed(1)
mydf <- data.frame(
  ID = rep(1:3, each = 6),
  ACC = sample(0:5, 18, replace = TRUE),
  TYPE = rep(1:3, 6)
)

Step 1: aggregate

temp <- aggregate(ACC ~ ID + TYPE, mydf, mean)
temp
#   ID TYPE ACC
# 1  1    1 3.0
# 2  2    1 2.5
# 3  3    1 3.0
# 4  1    2 1.5
# 5  2    2 2.0
# 6  3    2 3.0
# 7  1    3 4.0
# 8  2    3 2.0
# 9  3    3 4.5

Step 2: reshape

reshape(temp, direction = "wide", idvar = "ID", timevar = "TYPE")
#   ID ACC.1 ACC.2 ACC.3
# 1  1   3.0   1.5   4.0
# 2  2   2.5   2.0   2.0
# 3  3   3.0   3.0   4.5

Update

dcast from "reshape2" can handle this in one step with its fun.aggregate argument, but you'll need to do some cleanup to fix the names.

> dcast(mydf, ID ~ TYPE, fun.aggregate = mean, value.var = "ACC")
  ID   1   2   3
1  1 3.0 1.5 4.0
2  2 2.5 2.0 2.0
3  3 3.0 3.0 4.5
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if DT is your data.table, then you can use by=Type (of course posting some sample data would help generate a more accurate answer):

but something like this should work

  DT[,  mean(ACC),  by = Type]
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Thank you for you comment. It gives me the mean ACC for the Types but I need the mean Type ACC for each participant. I tried to add ID after Type but it didn't work. –  user2205323 Mar 24 '13 at 20:54

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