Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

C# 3 btw... So I am working on my AI blackboard. Part of that is an associative map, of string names to a gerneric values (object), right now the value is stored as a boxed value type or a string cast to an object.

So something like this:

  public class ContextEntry
  {
    public string name;
    public object value;
  }

  public class BehaviorContext
  {
    public ContextEntry AddEntry<T>(string name, T value)
    {
      //checks to see if T is an allowed type, create a ContextEnetry
      //and adds it to map, returning a reference to the added entry
    }

    public bool GetValue<T>(string name, ref T val)
    {
      //look for entry, if found, do an as check with T, 
      //and then unbox the entry value into T
      //otherwise return false 
    }

    public bool GetValue(string name, ref object val)
    {
      //same as GetValue<T> but with object instead
    }

    public bool SetValue<T>(string name, T val)
    {
      //look for entry, if found, do an as check with T, 
      //and then box T into the entry value
      //otherwise return false 
    }

    public bool SetValue(string name, object val)
    {
      //same as SetValue<T> but instead checks val type is compatible with entry
    }

    protected Dictionary<string, ContextEntry> m_EntryMap = new Dictionary<string, ContextEntry>();
  }

For those adding entries, they can keep a copy of ContextEnty around and directly access the value from there.

So what I am seeing is the constant boxing and unbox is hurting me, when it comes to frame time, as this is used alot.

I was wondering if doing something like this for ContextEntry would be better.

public interface IContextEntry
  {
    string Name {get; set;} 
    bool SetObj(object o);
    void GetObj(ref object o);
  }  

  public class ContextEntry<T> : IContextEntry
  {
    public bool SetObj(object o) { //do a compatibility check then unbox into value }
    public void GetObj(ref object o) { //box value into o }
    public T value;
  }

Now i would keep a seperate dictionary of ContextEntry[T] per allowable type, and only search in right one if some one used GetValue[T] or SetValue[T]. If someone uses GetValue or SetValue, i would also keep a dictionary of IContextEntry with all entries. A user would use the templated versions of the functions often but also the non templated version often as well. When using a the non-templated versions, they would induce a virtual function call as well a boxing/unboxing.

Im wondering if its worth it. Any opinions?

share|improve this question
    
I wonder...if boxing/unboxing is really hurting performance (but you should measure) then you may keep different typed dictionaries (at least for common value types) plus one list of objects. Then provide typed overloaded methods (for both get/set) plus one generic one. I can't see how IContextEntry will help you. What, keeping that approach, you may do is to make ContextEntry a typed struct/class used with overloaded methods (so you won't need to keep separated lists). From a typed struct you can always get a boxed value (for compatibility with untyped gets). –  Adriano Repetti Mar 24 '13 at 20:32
    
If (un)boxing is hurting your performance then you have a very optimized code already i.e. (un)boxing is quite fast and there is a high probability that it is a non-issue performance-wise. –  Petar Repac Mar 24 '13 at 20:39
2  
Why are you using Object anyway? If you think that's where your performance problems lie, use a generic and not Object... –  Peter Ritchie Mar 24 '13 at 21:01
1  
I don't see any struct in your sample... Not sure what "boxing"/"unboxing" you are talking about. Please show sample code that matches your definition of "boxing". –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 24 '13 at 21:03
    
He doesn't show any use of methods that take Object parameters--one can be assured any use of those methods with value types (structs) would result in boxing. –  Peter Ritchie Mar 24 '13 at 21:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.