Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I analyse code coverage in Visual Studio 2012, any of the await lines in async methods are showing as not covered even though they are obviously executing since my tests are passing. The code coverage report says that the uncovered method is MoveNext, which is not present in my code (perhaps it's compiler-generated).

Is there a way to fix code coverage reporting for async methods?

Note:

I just ran coverage using NCover, and the coverage numbers make a lot more sense using that tool. As a workaround for now, I'll be switching to that.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This can happen most commonly if the operation you're awaiting is completed before it's awaited.

I recommend you test at least synchronous and asynchronous success situations, but it's also a good idea to test synchronous and asynchronous errors and cancellations.

share|improve this answer
    
The methods are all completing, and the tests are passing. It looks like I'm encountering a limitation of the tool. –  Jacob Mar 24 '13 at 22:17
    
Right, but are the operations already complete at the point of the await? –  Stephen Cleary Mar 24 '13 at 22:52
    
Gotcha... so you'd really have to test those scenarios for each instance of await? If you had a method with 5 awaits, you'd have to write at least 15 test cases to get 100% coverage? That seems like a bug to me. That seems more to me like testing the async mechanisms emitted by the compiler than testing your own code. –  Jacob Mar 24 '13 at 23:25
    
I agree you should not have to test the async mechanisms, but there's several different paths of execution wrapped up in an await. So do consider all the semantics of your method: should it complete if the awaited task does not complete? Should it complete synchronously if the awaited task is already complete? Should it propagate exceptions? Once you start covering all the actual semantics, you may find the code coverage isn't a problem. In my AsyncEx library, there are a few places where code coverage is impossible, so I'll never be 100%. It doesn't keep me up at night. :) –  Stephen Cleary Mar 25 '13 at 2:05
1  
I did a blog post on this issue. Check it out bernhard-richter.blogspot.no/2014/09/… –  seesharper Sep 11 '14 at 13:36

There are situations where I don't care about testing the async nature of a method but just want to get rid of the partial code coverage. I use below extension method to avoid this and it works just fine for me.

Warning "Thread.Sleep" used here!

public static IReturnsResult<TClass> ReturnsAsyncDelayed<TClass, TResponse>(this ISetup<TClass, Task<TResponse>> setup, TResponse value) where TClass : class
{
    var completionSource = new TaskCompletionSource<TResponse>();
    Task.Run(() => { Thread.Sleep(200); completionSource.SetResult(value); });
    return setup.Returns(completionSource.Task);
}

and the usage is similar to the Moq's ReturnsAsync Setup.

_sampleMock.Setup(s => s.SampleMethodAsync()).ReturnsAsyncDelayed(response);
share|improve this answer

The reason the code is not shown as being covered has to do with how async methods are implemented. The C# compiler actually translates the code in async methods into a class that implements a state machine, and transforms the original method into a stub that initialized and invokes that state machine. Since this code is generated in your assembly, it is included in the code coverage analysis.

If you use a task that is not complete at the time the code being covered is executing, the compiler-generated state machine hooks up a completion callback to resume when the task completes. This more completely exercises the state machine code, and results in complete code coverage (at least for statement-level code coverage tools).

A common way to get a task that is not complete at the moment, but will complete at some point is to use Task.Delay in your unit test. However, that is generally a poor option because the time delay is either too small (and results in unpredictable code coverage because sometimes the task is complete before the code being tests runs) or too large (unnecessarily slowing the tests down).

A better option is to use "await Task.Yield()". This will return immediately but invoke the continuation as soon as it is set.

Another option - though somewhat absurd - is to implement your own awaitable pattern that has the semantics of reporting incomplete until a continuation callback is hooked up, and then to immediately complete. This basically forces the state machine into the async path, providing the complete coverage.

To be sure, this is not a perfect solution. The most unfortunate aspect is that it requires modification to production code to address a limitation of a tool. I would much prefer that the code coverage tool ignore the portions of the async state machine that are generated by the compiler. But until that happens, there aren’t many options if you really want to try to get complete code coverage.

A more complete explanation of this hack can be found here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dwayneneed/archive/2014/11/17/code-coverage-with-async-await.aspx

share|improve this answer

I created a test runner that runs a block of code multiple times and varies the task that is delayed using a factory. This is great for testing the different paths through simple blocks of code. For more complex paths you may want to create a test per path.

[TestMethod]
public async Task ShouldTestAsync()
{
    await AsyncTestRunner.RunTest(async taskFactory =>
    {
        this.apiRestClient.GetAsync<List<Item1>>(NullString).ReturnsForAnyArgs(taskFactory.Result(new List<Item1>()));
        this.apiRestClient.GetAsync<List<Item2>>(NullString).ReturnsForAnyArgs(taskFactory.Result(new List<Item2>()));

        var items = await this.apiController.GetAsync();

        this.apiRestClient.Received().GetAsync<List<Item1>>(Url1).IgnoreAwait();
        this.apiRestClient.Received().GetAsync<List<Item2>>(Url2).IgnoreAwait();

        Assert.AreEqual(0, items.Count(), "Zero items should be returned.");
    });
}

public static class AsyncTestRunner
{
    public static async Task RunTest(Func<ITestTaskFactory, Task> test)
    {
        var testTaskFactory = new TestTaskFactory();
        while (testTaskFactory.NextTestRun())
        {
           await test(testTaskFactory);
        }
    }
}

public class TestTaskFactory : ITestTaskFactory
{
    public TestTaskFactory()
    {
        this.firstRun = true;
        this.totalTasks = 0;
        this.currentTestRun = -1;   // Start at -1 so it will go to 0 for first run.
        this.currentTaskNumber = 0;
    }

    public bool NextTestRun()
    {
        // Use final task number as total tasks.
        this.totalTasks = this.currentTaskNumber;

        // Always return has next as turn for for first run, and when we have not yet delayed all tasks.
        // We need one more test run that tasks for if they all run sync.
        var hasNext = this.firstRun || this.currentTestRun <= this.totalTasks;

        // Go to next run so we know what task should be delayed, 
        // and then reset the current task number so we start over.
        this.currentTestRun++;
        this.currentTaskNumber = 0;
        this.firstRun = false;

        return hasNext;
    }

    public async Task<T> Result<T>(T value, int delayInMilliseconds = DefaultDelay)
    {
        if (this.TaskShouldBeDelayed())
        {
            await Task.Delay(delayInMilliseconds);
        }

        return value;
    }

    private bool TaskShouldBeDelayed()
    {
        var result = this.currentTaskNumber == this.currentTestRun - 1;
        this.currentTaskNumber++;
        return result;
    }

    public async Task VoidResult(int delayInMilliseconds = DefaultDelay)
    {
        // If the task number we are on matches the test run, 
        // make it delayed so we can cycle through them.
        // Otherwise this task will be complete when it is reached.
        if (this.TaskShouldBeDelayed())
        {
            await Task.Delay(delayInMilliseconds);
        }
    }

    public async Task<T> FromResult<T>(T value, int delayInMilliseconds = DefaultDelay)
    {
        if (this.TaskShouldBeDelayed())
        {
            await Task.Delay(delayInMilliseconds);
        }

        return value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.