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I have found an example of responsive email templates where there are such CSS declarations such as the following:

a[class="btn"]

Why is this syntax used if it's totally the same as:

a.btn

Does it have any impact on mobile browsers or anything else?

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possible duplicate of What do square brackets in CSS class names mean? –  Jevgeni Bogatyrjov Feb 12 at 9:08
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@Jevgeni Bogatyrjov: That is a totally different question that is not even related to CSS, but I can see how it might have been confusing because of the incorrect title. I've edited it. –  BoltClock Mar 2 at 10:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 52 down vote accepted

The [] syntax is an attribute selector.

a[class="btn"]

This will select any <a> tag with class="btn". However, it will not select <a> which has class="btn btn_red", for example (whereas a.btn would). It only exactly matches that attribute.

You may want to read The 30 CSS Selectors you Must Memorize. It's invaluable to any up-and-coming web developer.

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but it has nothing to do responsiveness, it's pure CSS syntax, right? –  ducin Mar 24 '13 at 21:28
    
@tkoomzaaskz Correct. –  Eric Mar 24 '13 at 21:29
    
Exact match... oh good one! –  FelipeAls Mar 24 '13 at 21:30
    
I also came across the same tutorial (campaignmonitor.com/guides/mobile/coding) - it seems odd that they would use this technique in a tutorial. Tutorials should make things as clear as possible for people starting out. Especially when the common .btn selector would suffice. Am i missing somthing? Is there any benefit to this? Greater specificity I am guessing? –  nickspiel Mar 25 '14 at 5:29

protected by Community Dec 17 '14 at 4:03

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