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I need a default constructor with no argument. How can I initialize attribute a which is of unknown type to me.

template <typename Type>
class Foo
{
public:
    Foo() : a(), b(0) {}  <---- Here is the confusion

private:
    Type a;
    int b;
};

Edit : Answer has been given in comments below, but there is still something I don't understand. If I have :

typedef enum {AB, CD} EnumType

template <typename Type>
class Foo
{
public:
    Foo() {}  // <---- "Member 'b' was no initialized in this constructor"

private:
    Type a;
    EnumType b;
};

my compiler gives me this warning : Member 'b' was no initialized in this constructor. Why is it giving me this warning for b which is an enum and not for a ?

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1  
What you are doing is correct, as long as Type has a default constructor, or is a built-in. –  juanchopanza Mar 24 '13 at 21:34
    
Writing a() works with types like int, char, etc. ? –  Gradient Mar 24 '13 at 21:35
1  
Yes it does, you could have written Foo() : a(), b() {} –  juanchopanza Mar 24 '13 at 21:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

this is correct as long as type Type has default constructor. when you declare template you are assuming some things about types, not every type can be passed in constructor of specific template. here, everything will be just fine for standard types and for those that have default constructor. if you initialize class Foo with your own type that doesn't provide default constructor it will be an error.

to answer your second issue:

If you had defined your variable at namespace scope, it would be value initialized to 0.

enum SomeEnum {  
    EValue1 = 1,  
    EValue2 = 4,  
};
SomeEnum e; // e is 0
int i;      // i is 0

int main()
{
    cout << e << " " << i; //prints 0 0 
}

Don't be surprised that e can have values different from any of SomeEnum's enumerator values. Each enumeration type has an underlying integral type(such as int, short, or long) and the set of possible values of an object of that enumeration type is the set of values that the underlying integral type has. Enum is just a way to conveniently name some of the values and create a new type, but you don't restrict the values of your enumeration by the set of the enumerators' values.

To zero-initialize an object of type T means:
— if T is a scalar type (3.9), the object is set to the value of 0 (zero) converted to T;

Note that enumerations are scalar types.

To value-initialize an object of type T means:
— if T is a class type blah blah
— if T is a non-union class type blah blah
— if T is an array type, then blah blah — otherwise, the object is zero-initialized

typedef enum {a,b,c,d} EnumType;

template <typename Type>
class Foo
{
public:
    Foo() {}  // <---- "Member 'b' was no initialized in this constructor"

public:
    Type a;
    EnumType b;
};

/*
 * 
 */
int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    Foo<int> fo;
    std::cout<<std::endl<<"fo.a:"<<fo.a<<",fo.b:"<<fo.b<<std::endl;
    EnumType e=d;
    fo.b=d;
    std::cout<<std::endl<<"fo.a:"<<fo.a<<",fo.b:"<<fo.b<<std::endl;

    Foo<int>* go=new Foo<int>;
    std::cout<<std::endl<<"go->a:"<<go->a<<",go->b:"<<go->b<<std::endl;
    go->b=d;
    std::cout<<std::endl<<"go->a:"<<go->a<<",go->b:"<<go->b<<std::endl;

fo.a:-137090040,fo.b:32767

fo.a:-137090040,fo.b:3

go->a:-166889576,go->b:32767

go->a:-166889576,go->b:3

now:

    Foo<int>* go=new Foo<int>();
    std::cout<<std::endl<<"go->a:"<<go->a<<",go->b:"<<go->b<<std::endl;
    go->b=d;
    std::cout<<std::endl<<"go->a:"<<go->a<<",go->b:"<<go->b<<std::endl;

go->a:0,go->b:0

go->a:0,go->b:3

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So the warning means this : "as I didn't initialize b it in Foo constructor, then it will be zero-initialized and it might not be what you meant, hence this warning". Is my interpretation correct? –  Gradient Mar 24 '13 at 22:47
    
In your example, a and b doesn't seem to be zero-initialized. –  Gradient Mar 24 '13 at 22:50
    
it isn't. it will be zero initialized if you create it on heap –  0d0a Mar 24 '13 at 22:51
    
Isn't go created on heap? –  Gradient Mar 24 '13 at 22:53
    
was, but without default initialization, you have to do () if want to default initialize, see added example. only POD is initialized by default –  0d0a Mar 24 '13 at 22:54

How can I initialize attribute a which is of unknown type to me.

Your solution is correct. Per Paragraph 8.5/11 of the C++11 Standard:

An object whose initializer is an empty set of parentheses, i.e., (), shall be value-initialized. [...]

Then, Paragraph 8.5/8:

To value-initialize an object of type T means:

— if T is a (possibly cv-qualified) class type (Clause 9) with either no default constructor (12.1) or a default constructor that is user-provided or deleted, then the object is default-initialized;

— if T is a (possibly cv-qualified) non-union class type without a user-provided or deleted default constructor, then the object is zero-initialized and, if T has a non-trivial default constructor, default-initialized;

— if T is an array type, then each element is value-initialized;

— otherwise, the object is zero-initialized.

Finally,

Why is it giving me this warning for b which is an enum and not for a ?

That is probably because you specify a template argument for Type which is a UDT (user-defined type) which can be default-constructed. If this is not the case, then I would expect the compiler to also warn you about a not being initialized in the constructor. Notice, however, that the compiler is not required to issue any such warning.

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