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I am having trouble coloring my JTable cells. I am making a tetris game. All the functionality of the game works; button presses, keyboard interaction to move pieces, removing complete rows, etc. The output that occurs now is simply table integer values printing out (see screenshot). These integer values refer to a color. I have the code to change the color of the cells based on said integer value in the MyRenderer class below but no coloring happens. I was wondering if there is some "rerender" method I am just not finding or do I need to build my own paint method to call?

Any suggestions?

    startGame.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            card3.remove(0); // Removes button
            model = new MyTableModel();
            table = new JTable(model);
            table.setDefaultRenderer(int.class, new MyRenderer());
            table.setRowHeight(GRID_ROW_HEIGHT);
            table.setFocusable(false);
            table.setRowSelectionAllowed(true);
            for (int i = 0; i < NUM_COLS; i++) {
                table.getColumnModel().getColumn(i)
                        .setPreferredWidth(table.getRowHeight());
            }
            card3.add(table);
            JButton pauseButton = new JButton("Pause");
            card3.add(pauseButton);

            pauseButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
                @Override
                public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                    game.pause();
                }
            });

            card3.setFocusable(true);
            card3.requestFocusInWindow();

            KeyListener kl = new KeyListener() {
                public void keyTyped(KeyEvent e) {
                }

                public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {
                }

                @Override
                public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
                    if (e.getKeyChar() == 'a' || e.getKeyChar() == 'A') {
                        game.move_Left();
                        draw_grid_first_time();
                        card3.revalidate();
                    } else if (e.getKeyChar() == 'd'
                            || e.getKeyChar() == 'D') {
                        game.move_Right();
                        draw_grid_first_time();
                        card3.revalidate();
                    } else if (e.getKeyChar() == 'q'
                            || e.getKeyChar() == 'Q') {
                        game.rotate_left();
                        draw_grid_first_time();
                        card3.revalidate();
                    } else if (e.getKeyChar() == 'e'
                            || e.getKeyChar() == 'E') {
                        game.rotate_right();
                        draw_grid_first_time();
                        card3.revalidate();
                    } else if (e.getKeyChar() == ' ') {
                        game.pause();
                    }
                }
            };
            card3.addKeyListener(kl);

            draw_grid_first_time();
            card3.revalidate(); // Redraws graphics

            Timer timer = new Timer(500, new ActionListener() {
                @Override
                public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                    if (!game.getPause()) {
                        game.move_Down();
                        draw_grid();
                        card3.revalidate(); // Redraws graphics
                    }
                }

                public void draw_grid() {
                    for (int i = 0; i < game.getNumRows(); i++) {
                        for (int j = 0; j < game.getNumCols(); j++) {
                            int[][] grid = game.getGrid();
                            model.setValueAt(grid[j][i], i, j);
                        }
                    }
                }
            });
            timer.setRepeats(true);
            timer.setCoalesce(true);
            timer.start();
            if (game.isOver()) {
                timer.stop();
            }
        }
    });

    // Sets up layout
    cards = new JPanel(new CardLayout());
    cards.add(card1, SPLASHSCREEN);
    cards.add(card2, MAINMENU);
    cards.add(card3, TETRIS);

    // Creates the actual window
    pane.add(cards, BorderLayout.CENTER);
}

public void draw_grid_first_time() {
    for (int i = 0; i < game.getNumRows(); i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < game.getNumCols(); j++) {
            int[][] grid = game.getGrid();
            model.setValueAt(grid[j][i], i, j);
        }
    }
}       

// Render each cell as a background color dependent on grid from tetris game
class MyRenderer implements TableCellRenderer {
    public Component getTableCellRendererComponent(JTable table,
            Object value, boolean isSelected, boolean hasFocus, int row,
                int column) {
        JTextField editor = new JTextField();
        if (value != null) {
            editor.setText(value.toString());
        }
        if ((Integer) table.getValueAt(row, column) == 0) {
            editor.setBackground(Color.DARK_GRAY);
        } else if ((Integer) table.getValueAt(row, column) == 1) {
            editor.setBackground(Color.RED);
        } else if ((Integer) table.getValueAt(row, column) == 2) {
            editor.setBackground(Color.GREEN);
        } else if ((Integer) table.getValueAt(row, column) == 3) {
            editor.setBackground(Color.BLUE);
        } else if ((Integer) table.getValueAt(row, column) == 4) {
            editor.setBackground(Color.YELLOW);
        }
        return editor;
    }
}
// Overwrite the Table Model to be what I want color wise
@SuppressWarnings("serial")
class MyTableModel extends AbstractTableModel {
    private int[][] values = new int[NUM_COLS][NUM_ROWS];
            public int getColumnCount() {
        return NUM_COLS;
    }
            public int getRowCount() {
        return NUM_ROWS;
    }

    public Object getValueAt(int row, int col) {
        return values[col][row];
    }
    public void setValueAt(Object val, int row, int col) {
        values[col][19 - row] = (Integer) val;
        fireTableCellUpdated(row, col);
    }
}

Tetris Screenshot

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand the question. @MadProgrammer gave you a working concept in your last question (stackoverflow.com/questions/15538237/…) that did this for you. So compare how your code is different from the working example that you based your solution on. –  camickr Mar 25 '13 at 3:54
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should not allocate a new component in the renderer's getTableCellRendererComponent(). JTable reuses a single renderer for all cells. In your case you allocate new component for every cell, many times. For details see Concepts: Editors and Renderers in How to Use Tables tutorial. Consider this extension of DefaultTableCellRenderer (note that DefaultTableCellRenderer is an extension of JLabel):

class MyRenderer extends DefaultTableCellRenderer {
    public Component getTableCellRendererComponent(JTable table,
            Object value, boolean isSelected, boolean hasFocus, int row,
            int column) {
        Component c = super.getTableCellRendererComponent(table,
                value, isSelected, hasFocus, row, column);
        c.setBackground(getColor((Integer) value));
        return c;
    }

    private Color getColor(int value) {
        switch(value){
        case 1: return Color.RED;
        case 2: return Color.GREEN;
        //TODO the rest of colors
        }
        return Color.DARK_GRAY;
    }
}

Also note that since you are setting the renderer for integer column, make sure that your model actually returns a valid class in its getColumnClass() implementation. Otherwise, the renderer will not be used. For example DefaultTableModel.getColumnClass() returns Object.class for all columns.

getColumnClass() returns the class that describes the data objects stored in the specified column. This is used by JTable to assign a default renderer and editor for that column. In your case, if you store integers in the model, then getColumnClass() should return Integer.class. Note however, that Integer.class and int.class are different. So setDefaultRenderer should correspond to the class that is returned by getColumnClass. In your case, either int.Class in both places or Integer.Class.

Another point, look into How to Use Key Bindings as key listeners is a lower level interface

share|improve this answer
1  
@ScottStanchfield DefaultTableCellRenderer calls setOpaque(true) in its constructor. –  Aqua Mar 25 '13 at 0:58
1  
good to know - thanks! –  Scott Stanchfield Mar 25 '13 at 1:25
1  
@Aqua Instead of table.getValueAt(row, column)) you could simply use value –  MadProgrammer Mar 25 '13 at 2:06
1  
@mstep91 If you take a look at my previous answer, I use an AbstractTableModel (DefaultTableModel extends from this), I overrode the getColumnClass method to return Integer.class. Your table model needs to do the same, –  MadProgrammer Mar 25 '13 at 3:34
1  
@mstep91 note that int.class and Integer.class are different. I noticed that you setup the renderer for int.class, so return the same in the getColumnClass –  Aqua Mar 25 '13 at 3:48
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