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In Java, can I fall through only one of the cases in a switch statement? I understand that if I break, I will fall through to the end of the switch statement.

Here's what I mean. Given the following code, on case 2, I want to execute case 2 and case 1. On case 3, I want to execute case 3 and case 1, but not case 2.

switch(option) {
    case 3:  // code
             // skip the next case, not break
    case 2:  // code
    case 1:  // code
}
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just try giving different orders to switch statements and applying break and without break statement and see what happens –  Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' Mar 25 '13 at 2:10
2  
interesting thought, but it sort of smells of goto. –  FatalError Mar 25 '13 at 2:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, what you are after is not possible with a switch statement. You will fall through each case until you hit a break. Perhaps you want case 1 to be outside of your switch statement, so that it is executed regardless.

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Put the code into methods and call as appropriate. Following your example:

void case1() {
    // Whatever case 1 does
}

void case2() {
    // Whatever case 2 does
}

void case3() {
    // Whatever case 3 does
}

switch(option) {
    case 3:
        case3();
        case1();
        break;
    case 2:
        case2();
        case1();
        break;
    case 1: 
        case1();   // You didn't specify what to do for case 1, so I assume you want case1()
        break;
    default:
        // Always a good idea to have a default, just in case demons are summoned
}

Of course case3(), case2()... are very poor method names, you should rename to something more meaningful about what the method actually does.

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My suggestion is to not use fallthrough for anything except cases like the following:

switch (option) {
    case 3:
        doSomething();
        break;
    case 2:
    case 1:
        doSomeOtherThing();
        break;
    case 0:
        // do nothing
        break;
}

That is, giving several cases the exact same block of code to handle them (by "stacking" the case labels), making it more or less obvious what the flow is here. I doubt most programmers intuitively check for case fall through (because the indentation makes a case look like as a proper block) or can efficiently read code that relies on it - I know I don't.

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+1 for pointing out fallthrough unreadability –  m0skit0 Mar 25 '13 at 2:33
switch(option) 
{
    case 3:
        ...
        break;
    case 2: 
        ...
        break;
}

... // code for case 1
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1  
Copy of nicholas.hauschild's answer. –  m0skit0 Mar 25 '13 at 2:21
    
Independent discovery:) –  bayou.io Mar 25 '13 at 2:24
    
You should read the existing answers before posting :) –  m0skit0 Mar 25 '13 at 2:27
1  
@m0skit0 Seeing as nicholas' answer doesn't provide code, this one adds information to the "thread" as a whole. I don't see anything wrong with taking part in a landgrab on SO, it's not a wiki, and you're allowed to improve on others' answers. Merit should be more important than some vague notion of "fairness", and voting generally favours people who post answers sooner, late substantially identical copies are likely to end up buried anyway. (As is the case here.) –  millimoose Mar 27 '13 at 21:40
    
@millimoose I understand and agree, thanks for pointing that out. –  m0skit0 Mar 27 '13 at 21:50

Something like this maybe.

switch(option) {
    case 3:  // code
             // skip the next case, not break
        // BLOCK-3
    case 2:  // code
        if(option == 3) break;
        // BLOCK-2
    case 1:  // code
        // BLOCK-1
}
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case 2: if(option == 3) break; You're summoning demons! –  m0skit0 Mar 25 '13 at 2:19

In switch statement if you don't break the subsequent case is executed. To give you simple example

    int value = 2;
    switch(value) {
    case 1: 
        System.out.println("one");
        break;
    case 2: 
        System.out.println("two");
    case 3: 
        System.out.println("three");
        break;
    }

Will output

two
three

Because break wansn't executed on case 2

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From the question: "On case 3, I want to execute case 3 and case 1" –  m0skit0 Mar 25 '13 at 2:20
    
This was meant to be a simple example on how switch statements work. Not a direct answer. We don't want a copy & paste answer on SO all the time right? –  gerrytan Mar 25 '13 at 4:05
1  
But we definitely do want an answer to the question :) –  m0skit0 Mar 25 '13 at 4:07

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