Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've seen several examples for converting a number from decimal to hex (or base 10 to base 16), but I have a few restrictions for what I'm trying to do. I need to be able to convert a string with a decimal number into another string as a hex number. The number is potentially too big to fit inside of any primitive data types - ie: can't use ints, unsigned ints, doubles, etc...

This should be able to perform the same calculations as listed on this page. http://www.kaagaard.dk/service/convert.htm

I've tried this, but it hasn't worked for me.

The call to the function:

const int maxLen = 256;
char destination[maxLen];
int retVal = convertBase(destination, maxLen, "123487032174829820348320429437483266812812");

The function definition:

int convertBase(char* dest, int maxDestLength, const char* inputInBase10)
{
    const char lookUpTable[] = { "0123456789abcdef" };
    const std::string input = inputInBase10;
    const unsigned int inputSize = input.length();

    std::string output;
    output.reserve(2 * inputSize);

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < inputSize; ++i)
    {
        const unsigned char c = input[i];
        output.push_back(lookUpTable[c >> 4]);  
        output.push_back(lookUpTable[c & 15]);
    }

    if(output.length() < maxDestLength)
        strcpy_s(dest, output.length(), output.c_str());
    else
        strcpy_s(dest, maxDestLength, output.c_str());

    cout << dest << endl;

    return strlen(dest);
}

The expected hex number: "16ae5514d07e120126dfbcb3073fddb2b8c"

The actual hex number generated: "313233343837303332313734383239383230333438333230343239343337343833323636383132383132"

Also, I keep getting an error that the buffer is too small when passing back into a char* (repeated below)

    if(output.length() < maxDestLength)
        strcpy_s(dest, output.length(), output.c_str());
    else
        strcpy_s(dest, maxDestLength, output.c_str());
share|improve this question
1  
You're converting the ASCII values of the digits in the input string to hex, not the actual number represented by the input string. –  Jonathan Potter Mar 25 '13 at 3:06
2  
Here's a hint: the output you're getting ("313233343837") looks like the ASCII values (encoded in the string as hex bytes) of the characters of your input number - e.g. 0x38 == '8' –  Matt Curtis Mar 25 '13 at 3:06
1  
Generally you need to do long division for this kind of thing, but when you don't have long division, you can build it up with a series of additions. Does this have to be optimal? I have a non-optimal but simple solution. –  paddy Mar 25 '13 at 3:35
    
Optimal is preferred, but any solution at all is welcome. –  rkeller Mar 25 '13 at 3:38
    
Well, my answer should help you. Incidentally, it correctly converts the number you gave in your example, whereas that number service you linked to can't handle it. –  paddy Mar 25 '13 at 4:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So if you're in a hurry to get anything, and are not too concerned about efficiency, try this. I've adapted a function that I wrote for the following SO question: c++ string (int) + string (int)

First, I modified the Add function to work for any base between 2 and 36:

const int MIN_BASE = 2;
const int MAX_BASE = 36;

static bool tablesInitialised = false;
static char tblIntToChar[MAX_BASE] = {0};
static int tblCharToInt[256] = {0};

void InitTables()
{
    if( tablesInitialised ) return;

    for( int i = 0; i < 10; i++ ) {
        tblIntToChar[i] = '0' + i;
        tblCharToInt[tblIntToChar[i]] = i;
    }

    for( int i = 0; i < 26; i++ ) {
        tblIntToChar[i+10] = 'a' + i;
        tblCharToInt['a' + i] = i + 10;
        tblCharToInt['A' + i] = i + 10;
    }

    tablesInitialised = true;
}


// Adds two numbers using long addition.
string Add( const string& a, const string& b, int base=10 )
{
    InitTables();
    if( base > MAX_BASE || base < MIN_BASE ) return "";

    // Reserve storage for the result.
    string result;
    result.reserve( 1 + std::max(a.size(), b.size()) );

    // Column positions and carry flag.
    int apos = a.size();
    int bpos = b.size();
    int carry = 0;

    // Do long arithmetic.
    while( carry > 0 || apos > 0 || bpos > 0 )
    {
        if( apos > 0 ) carry += tblCharToInt[(unsigned char)a[--apos]];
        if( bpos > 0 ) carry += tblCharToInt[(unsigned char)b[--bpos]];
        result.push_back(tblIntToChar[carry%base]);
        carry /= base;
    }

    // The result string is backwards.  Reverse and return it.
    reverse( result.begin(), result.end() );
    return result;
}


// Converts a single value to some base, intended for single-digit conversions.
string AsBase( int number, int base )
{
    InitTables();
    if( number <= 0 ) return "0";
    string result;
    while( number > 0 ) {
        result += tblIntToChar[number%base];
        number /= base;
    }
    reverse( result.begin(), result.end() );
    return result;
}

And, using all the above, here is a function to convert from one arbitrary base to another:

// Converts a number from one base to another.
string ConvertBase( const string & number, int oldBase, int newBase )
{
    InitTables();
    string result;

    for( unsigned digit = 0; digit < number.size(); digit++ )
    {
        int value = tblCharToInt[(unsigned char)number[digit]];
        if( result.empty() )
        {
            result = AsBase( value, newBase );
        }
        else 
        {
            string temp = result;
            for( int i = 1; i < oldBase; i++ ) {
                temp = Add( result, temp, newBase );
            }
            result = Add( temp, AsBase(value, newBase), newBase );
        }
    }

    return result;
}

This is just something I hacked up using code I mostly had kicking around in my StackOverflow 'for fun' sandbox. It's pretty clunky the way it performs oldBase additions instead of just doing one multiplication. This would be a lot better if you made a Multiply function to do long multiplication.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is great! –  rkeller Mar 25 '13 at 16:54

You can't solve the problem by going through each character individually. The reason is that two characters need to be considered when deciding which hex digit needs to be used.

for example "12" would be correctly represented as "C" where your algorithm won't take that into consideration.

You should also be reading from right to left rather than left to right

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.