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I'm trying to implement a simple state machine based on a modified version of the state pattern using methods as states instead of classes, something like this:

private Action<Input> currentState;
private void NextState(Input i) {
    currentState(i);
}

private void State1(Input i) {
    if( i ... )
        currentState = State1;
    else
        currentState = State2;
}

private void State2(Input i) {
    if( i ... )
        currentState = State1;
    else
        currentState = State2;  
}

But it would be more elegant if I could do:

private void NextState(Input i) {
    currentState = currentState(i);
}

private Func<xxx> State1() {
    if( i ... )
        return State1;
    else
        return State2;
}

But I don't know how to write this Func. Is there a way to do this?

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Maybe I'm not familiar with what you're doing, but typically state machines are defined by a single state variable. This is often best described by an enum of the states. –  Jonathon Reinhart Mar 25 '13 at 3:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want to use functions which return void, try using Action instead.

private Action State1() {
    if( ... )
        return State1Inner;
    else
        return State2Inner;
}

If you want to use a function which returns a function with it's own signature, you have to define a custom delegate type first. Here's a generic version:

public delegate State<T> State<T>(T input);

private State<int> State1(int input) {
    if( ... )
        return State1;
    else
        return State2;
}

This will help you avoid having inner state functions.

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2  
+1. Also for traditional FSM it should be Action<TInput> as transitions should be happening based on some sort of input value. –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 25 '13 at 3:33
    
I want it to be simple, without inner states, that is, one state should be able to return itself or other states (based on some TInput, which I didn't write in my example). So states don't return void, the question is I don't know what it returns. –  Roberto Mar 25 '13 at 12:21
    
@Roberto then you would need to define a custom delegate. See my updated answer –  p.s.w.g Mar 25 '13 at 14:28
    
@p.s.w.g Thank you. I was confused about writing a delegate in which the type is the method itself. I still don't understand why it can't be public delegate State<int> State<int>(int input); –  Roberto Mar 25 '13 at 18:32
    
@Roberto it can be just public delegate State State(int input) but then it wouldn't be generic. –  p.s.w.g Mar 25 '13 at 18:37

You might want to take a look at this article, which discusses the use of the yield statement for doing state machines. This is commonly done in, for example, in the Unity3d game engine. (another discussion here)

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if you want to use methods as states and kind of refer to them "generically", you want function pointers. I'm not familiar with the syntax in c# but in c++ you can pass a pointer to a function, and call that function using its pointer. Essentally this means using a function as a paramater/variable - an action that will be used, but is unknown before runtime.

Look into function pointers, I think that will get you where you need to be, although I'm curious about the nature of what you are doing here exactly.

if you ARE using c#, it uses something called function delegates rather than pointers. read here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173171.aspx

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