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Basically I have an app where a user can select a timeslot for any day from now until 2 years from now. i'm creating a rake task that runs every day to add a record to my database for 2 years from now so that tomorrow, there will still be 2 years worth of timeslot choices.

With my current logic, i'm curious as to what will happen when there's a leap year, and is there a way to make this more robust to handle leap years correctly? I'm afraid that i'm either going to end up with a day that gets missed completely, or a day that gets duplicated.

task :generate_timeslots => :environment do

    startDate = Time.now.to_date + 2.years
    endDate = Time.now.to_date + 2.years

    startDate.upto(endDate).each do |d|

    5.times do  
       timeslot = Timeslot.create
       timeslot.location_id = 1
       timeslot.timeslot = "#{d} 09:00:00"
       timeslot.save

       timeslot = Timeslot.create
       timeslot.location_id = 1
       timeslot.timeslot = "#{d} 11:00:00"
       timeslot.save

       timeslot = Timeslot.create
       timeslot.location_id = 1
       timeslot.timeslot = "#{d} 13:00:00"
       timeslot.save

       timeslot = Timeslot.create
       timeslot.location_id = 1
       timeslot.timeslot = "#{d} 15:00:00"
       timeslot.save
    end
    end
end
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Your current script seems like something you'd run once per month, not once per day, given that you are setting start/end dates at the beginning/end of the month. Is that the case or are you wanting to run this every day? –  bensie Mar 28 '13 at 14:32
    
The beginning/end of month was just for testing. Same principal but I want it changed to the current day + 2 years. Good question though and now i see why people may be confused on my question. –  Catfish Mar 28 '13 at 14:50
    
I just updated my question to look at day instead of month. –  Catfish Mar 28 '13 at 14:50
    
You might find github.com/travisjeffery/timecop useful for testing this from different dates. –  Alex Ghiculescu Mar 29 '13 at 0:50
    
Looks like this would have been easy to test by running it with specific dates and printing the results –  Jeff Paquette Apr 1 '13 at 18:26

5 Answers 5

The answer is that IF 'two years from now' includes crossing a leap year's feb 29th date then an 'extra' day will be included in that backup to account for the 'extra' day of february 29th in the calendar.

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That's how i thought it would work. Do you have a better solution than date + 2.years? –  Catfish Mar 25 '13 at 3:42
1  
No I don't. I think it is a good solution because it just accounts properly for the extra day and still respect the calendar for dating and selection purposes. Think about this perhaps: how long is two years? It can be 730 days or 731 depending on whether it includes a leap year. Mostly Isay accept it or point out exactly the difficulty with it to help answer it better. –  Michael Durrant Mar 25 '13 at 3:50

If your task behaved in an idempotent manner, you would not worry about accidentally creating too many slots.

Alter your script to potentially generate overlapping days, but not where there are already enough slots, by selecting and counting them, prior to calling Timeslot.create. This has the added advantage of being (slightly) more robust in case of missing a run, and a lot more robust in cases where the script gets run too often.

I don't know the ORM you are using, so you have to treat some of this as pseudocode:

task :generate_timeslots => :environment do

  startDate = Time.now.to_date + 2.years - 2.days
  endDate = Time.now.to_date + 2.years

  startDate.upto(endDate).each do |d|

  daily_slots = ["09:00:00","11:00:00","13:00:00","15:00:00"]

  daily_slots.each do |daily_slot|
    ts = "#{d} #{daily_slot}"

    # I'm just guessing here (no ActiveRecord experience)
    num_existing = Timeslot.where( :timeslot => ts ).count

    next if num_existing >=5 

    (5-num_existing).times do  
       timeslot = Timeslot.create
       timeslot.location_id = 1
       timeslot.timeslot = ts
       timeslot.save
    end
  end
end
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You could send the actual leap days 4 years into the future, thus fixing the other side of the bug: my leap days don't get prefilled.

This solution would be accurate (if you don't have any time relevant data to fill into your tables) for several decades.

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Well, it's a leap year if (!(year % 100) == 0 || (year % 400 == 0)) && (year % 4 == 0). That's not at all rails syntax, but I just figured I'd interject this tidbit into the discussion.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's what i came up with. Instead of populating the dates every day, i'm going to set my cron to run on the first of every month and just loop for every day in that month. This will include feb 29th on leap years.

startDate       = (Time.now.beginning_of_month.to_date) + 2.years
endDate         = ((Time.now.beginning_of_month.to_date) + 2.years).end_of_month

startDate.upto(endDate).each do |d|

        5.times do

           timeslot = Timeslot.create
           timeslot.location_id = 1
           timeslot.timeslot = "#{d} 09:00:00"
           timeslot.save

           timeslot = Timeslot.create
           timeslot.location_id = 1
           timeslot.timeslot = "#{d} 11:00:00"
           timeslot.save

           timeslot = Timeslot.create
           timeslot.location_id = 1
           timeslot.timeslot = "#{d} 13:00:00"
           timeslot.save

           timeslot = Timeslot.create
           timeslot.location_id = 1
           timeslot.timeslot = "#{d} 15:00:00"
           timeslot.save
        end
end
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