Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I got a AsyncTask that is supposed to check the network access to a host name. But the doInBackground() is never timed out. Anyone have a clue?

public class HostAvailabilityTask extends AsyncTask<String, Void, Boolean> {

    private Main main;

    public HostAvailabilityTask(Main main) {
        this.main = main;
    }

    protected Boolean doInBackground(String... params) {
        Main.Log("doInBackground() isHostAvailable():"+params[0]);

        try {
            return InetAddress.getByName(params[0]).isReachable(30); 
        } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return false;       
    }

    protected void onPostExecute(Boolean... result) {
        Main.Log("onPostExecute()");

        if(result[0] == false) {
            main.setContentView(R.layout.splash);
            return;
        }

        main.continueAfterHostCheck();
    }   
}
share|improve this question
5  
To check for an internet connection, probably the most reliable way would be to ping one of the major name servers, this could be done for example with if(Runtime.getRuntime().exec("/system/bin/ping -c 1 8.8.8.8").waitFor()==0) .... See my answer for a nicer implementation of this. Btw the accepted answer (and many others here) just check for a network connection, not the internet. – Levit Dec 5 '14 at 9:29

33 Answers 33

up vote 813 down vote accepted

@Eddie. Just a minor edit to your solution - if the device is in airplane mode (or presumably in other situations where there's no available network), cm.getActiveNetworkInfo() will be null, so you need to add a null check.

Modified solution below:

public boolean isOnline() {
    ConnectivityManager cm =
        (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
    NetworkInfo netInfo = cm.getActiveNetworkInfo();
    return netInfo != null && netInfo.isConnectedOrConnecting();
}

Also add the following permission to the AndroidManifest.xml:

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE" />

One other small point, if you absolutely need a network connection at the given point in time, then it might be better to use netInfo.isConnected() rather than netInfo.isConnectedOrConnecting. I guess this is up to the indivudal use-case however.

share|improve this answer
75  
imo you still should and need to check for http timeout exceptions since there might be situations when a network is connected but there would no actual internet connection because the only way to access it is through, for instance, VPN - this way u have, for instance, WI-FI connection but no actual internet traffic. Another situation is a server hang-on. These are 2 issues that I've run recently and connection manager isn't gonna help there. – midnight Aug 5 '12 at 20:06
10  
I agree with midnight and Pintu, this answer should not be the accepted answer, it has nothing to do with checking wether you're on the internet. For example, if the phone is connected to a WiFi network with a captive portal, like at a hotel, this function will incorrectly return true. The correct answer is to ping a server on the public internet. – miguel Jan 31 '14 at 2:01
7  
when there is no working internet for my router, if I connect to router through wifi, then the above code is returning true. But, It is not supposed to be, right? Can you help me – MoHaN K RaJ Feb 15 '14 at 21:30
3  
I had to add the Context, in context.getSystemService or it doesn't work. I got my clue here androidhive.info/2012/07/… – Francisco Corrales Morales Jun 4 '14 at 15:53

No need to be complex. The simplest and framework manner is to use ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE permission and just make a connected method

public boolean isOnline() {
    ConnectivityManager cm =
        (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);

    return cm.getActiveNetworkInfo() != null && 
       cm.getActiveNetworkInfo().isConnectedOrConnecting();
}

You can also use requestRouteToHost if you have a particualr host and connection type (wifi/mobile) in mind.

You will also need:

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE" />

in your android manifest.

share|improve this answer
81  
it is better to do a null check at cm.getActiveNetworkInfo() level it threw a null if no active network was available. – Samuel Mar 8 '11 at 9:44
2  
This solution will return true if you are connected to a WiFi hotspot, even if this hotspot does NOT have internet connectivity. – Josh Sep 18 '15 at 7:33

What do you want?

  • If you just want to check for a connection to any network - not caring if internet is available - then most of the answers here (including the accepted), implementing isConnectedOrConnecting() will work well.
  • If you want to know if you have an internet connection (as the question title indicates) please read on

Ping for the main name servers

public boolean isOnline() {

    Runtime runtime = Runtime.getRuntime();
    try {

        Process ipProcess = runtime.exec("/system/bin/ping -c 1 8.8.8.8");
        int     exitValue = ipProcess.waitFor();
        return (exitValue == 0);

    } catch (IOException e)          { e.printStackTrace(); } 
      catch (InterruptedException e) { e.printStackTrace(); }

    return false;
}

That's it! Yes that short, yes it is fast, no it does not need to run in background, no you don't need root privileges.

Possible Questions

  • Is this really fast enough?

    Yes, very fast!

  • Is there really no reliable way to check if internet is available, other than testing something on the internet?

    Not as far as I know, but let me know, and I will edit my answer.

  • Couldn't I just ping my own page, which I want to request anyways?

    Sure! You could even check both, if you want to differentiate between "internet connection available" and your own servers beeing reachable

  • What if the DNS is down?

    Google DNS (e.g. 8.8.8.8) is the largest public DNS service in the world. As of 2013 it serves 130 billion requests a day. Let 's just say, your app not responding would probably not be the talk of the day.

  • Which permissions are required?

    <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.INTERNET" />
    

    Just internet access - what surprise ^^ (Btw have you ever thought about, how some of the methods suggested here could even have a remote glue about the availablility of internet, without this permission?)

share|improve this answer
6  
This is great peace of code! I found it very useful on devices that use prepaid cards! When they run out of money, they have internet access available, but no internet. So just checking for connectivity would not do. THANK YOU! – Blejzer Jan 20 '15 at 11:05
4  
This is best answer, thank you! :) – Michalsx May 7 '15 at 22:09
3  
Keep in mind this approach is a blocking one so you shouldn't execute it in the UI therad – Sergii May 28 '15 at 10:20
12  
@Levit This should be the accepted answer. Above answer just checks Network n NOT INTERNET CONNECTION. And yes this is very fast. Thanks. Hence upvote. – Roon13 Jun 4 '15 at 3:37
4  
This solution is not working for all devices. Some devices are always returning 2 as @Salmaan stated. The devices I tested had internet connection and the ping target is the Google DNS server - which is responding to ping requests. I think some vendors are not permitting ping requests. For example, I tested with a Samsung 10.1 tablet (4.3), and the solution is not working. When I run the ping command through the command line utility, I get a permission error. The command is also not working on emulators. Be careful using this solution. – Eren Yilmaz Jun 30 '15 at 14:40

To get getActiveNetworkInfo() to work you need to add the following to the manifest.

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE" />
share|improve this answer
2  
The INTERNET permission is NOT needed for this, just ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE. INTERNET is only needed if you are actually making connections to remote locations, not querying the state of the device's radio. – Tom Jan 14 '12 at 21:50

Take a look at the ConnectivityManager class. You can use this class to get information on the active connections on a host. http://developer.android.com/reference/android/net/ConnectivityManager.html

EDIT: You can use

Context.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE)
    .getNetworkInfo(ConnectivityManager.TYPE_MOBILE) 

or

Context.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE)
    .getNetworkInfo(ConnectivityManager.TYPE_WIFI) 

and parse the DetailedState enum of the returned NetworkInfo object

EDIT EDIT: To find out whether you can access a host, you can use

Context.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE)
    .requestRouteToHost(TYPE_WIFI, int hostAddress)

Obviously, I'm using Context.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE) as a proxy to say

ConnectivityManager cm = Context.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
cm.yourMethodCallHere();
share|improve this answer
1  
There was a mistake in the EDIT EDIT section, I'd left out the requestRouteToHost() call. Re-read the answer now :) – Chinmay Kanchi Oct 13 '09 at 16:11

check this code... it worked for me :)

public static void isNetworkAvailable(final Handler handler, final int timeout) {
    // ask fo message '0' (not connected) or '1' (connected) on 'handler'
    // the answer must be send before before within the 'timeout' (in milliseconds)

    new Thread() {
        private boolean responded = false;   
        @Override
        public void run() { 
            // set 'responded' to TRUE if is able to connect with google mobile (responds fast) 
            new Thread() {      
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    HttpGet requestForTest = new HttpGet("http://m.google.com");
                    try {
                        new DefaultHttpClient().execute(requestForTest); // can last...
                        responded = true;
                    } 
                    catch (Exception e) {
                    }
                } 
            }.start();

            try {
                int waited = 0;
                while(!responded && (waited < timeout)) {
                    sleep(100);
                    if(!responded ) { 
                        waited += 100;
                    }
                }
            } 
            catch(InterruptedException e) {} // do nothing 
            finally { 
                if (!responded) { handler.sendEmptyMessage(0); } 
                else { handler.sendEmptyMessage(1); }
            }
        }
    }.start();
}

Then, I define the handler:

Handler h = new Handler() {
    @Override
    public void handleMessage(Message msg) {

        if (msg.what != 1) { // code if not connected

        } else { // code if connected

        }   
    }
};

...and launch the test:

isNetworkAvailable(h,2000); // get the answser within 2000 ms
share|improve this answer
2  
What is Google is down? That also requires the INTERNET permission, which is unnecessary for the given task. Finally, that consumes data (even if insignificant). This just seems like such a kludge. – Tom Jan 14 '12 at 21:51
22  
@Tom to be fair, this is probably the only correct answer. The other examples merely show if a network connection is available and / or if there's a connection to that network, but don't answer the question if that network can actually also make a remote connection (for example to a website). So this answers the posters Q, and the other answers don't – slinden77 Jul 31 '12 at 11:56
7  
There is no point in doing this check. If you are going to spend the system time and network resources to connect to Google, you could have spent them instead connecting to the resource you actually care about. – Benjamin Aug 30 '13 at 18:34
4  
In China Google was blocked!! – Anthone Oct 9 '14 at 8:56
1  
@therealprashant: You could make it recursive(ish), and also put isNetworkAvailable(h,30000); right at the end of the run() part of the code (meaning, after requesting network availability, it does the same 30s later. Some thoughts: 1) Probably better to rename it to something like regularNetworkAvailabilityCheck() to clarify what it is doing. 2) Check/Test for side effects, threating problems, etc. (at least try it with 3 or 4 secs requests and see what happens - memory usage, etc.) 3) possibly try some other page than m.google.com (which requests 34950 unicode chars atm). – Levit Feb 17 '15 at 9:06

Found at and modified (!) from this link :

In your manifest file add at least:

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE" />

You probably already have the INTERNET permission if you are accessing it. Then a boolean function that allows to test for connectivity is:

private boolean checkInternetConnection() {
    ConnectivityManager cm = (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
    // test for connection
    if (cm.getActiveNetworkInfo() != null
            && cm.getActiveNetworkInfo().isAvailable()
            && cm.getActiveNetworkInfo().isConnected()) {
        return true;
    } else {
        Log.v(TAG, "Internet Connection Not Present");
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
cm.getActiveNetworkInfo().isAvailable() seems redundant. – Flow Jan 10 '13 at 22:09

I made this code, it is the simplest and it is just a boolean. by asking if(isOnline()){

You get if there is a connection and if it can connect to a page the status code 200 (stable connection).

Make sure to add the correct INTERNET and ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE permissions.

public boolean isOnline() {
    ConnectivityManager cm = (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
    NetworkInfo netInfo = cm.getActiveNetworkInfo();
    if (netInfo != null && netInfo.isConnected()) {
        try {
            URL url = new URL("http://www.google.com");
            HttpURLConnection urlc = (HttpURLConnection) url.openConnection();
            urlc.setConnectTimeout(3000);
            urlc.connect();
            if (urlc.getResponseCode() == 200) {
                return new Boolean(true);
            }
        } catch (MalformedURLException e1) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e1.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Maybe you should replace 200 by HttpURLConnection.HTTP_OK – Yash Jul 26 '13 at 22:55
1  
getting false even i have working internet – MoHaN K RaJ Feb 15 '14 at 21:46
1  
What if Google is down? – Gauraw Yadav Mar 26 '15 at 14:26

It does works for me:

To verify network availability:

private Boolean isNetworkAvailable() {
ConnectivityManager connectivityManager 
      = (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
NetworkInfo activeNetworkInfo = connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo();
return activeNetworkInfo != null && activeNetworkInfo.isConnectedOrConnecting();}

To verify internet access:

public Boolean isOnline() {
    try {
        Process p1 = java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime().exec("ping -c 1 www.google.com");
        int returnVal = p1.waitFor();
        boolean reachable = (returnVal==0);
        return reachable;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

Of everything I have seen so far shortest and cleanest way should be:

public final static boolean isConnected( Context context )
{   
   final ConnectivityManager connectivityManager = 
         (ConnectivityManager) context.getSystemService( Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE );  
   final NetworkInfo networkInfo = connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo();    
   return networkInfo != null && networkInfo.isConnected();
}

PS: This does not ping any host, it just checks the connectionstatus, so if your router has no internet connection and your device is connected to it this method would return true although you have no internet.
For an actual test I would recommend execuding a HttpHead request (e.g. to www.google.com) and check the status, if its 200 OK everything is fine and your device has an internet connection.

share|improve this answer

You can iterate over all network connections and chek whether there is at least one available connection:

public boolean isConnected() {
    boolean connected = false;

    ConnectivityManager cm = 
        (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);

    if (cm != null) {
        NetworkInfo[] netInfo = cm.getAllNetworkInfo();

        for (NetworkInfo ni : netInfo) {
            if ((ni.getTypeName().equalsIgnoreCase("WIFI")
                    || ni.getTypeName().equalsIgnoreCase("MOBILE"))
                    && ni.isConnected() && ni.isAvailable()) {
                connected = true;
            }

        }
    }

    return connected;
}
share|improve this answer

One important use case on mobile devices to it ensure an actual connection exists. This is a common problem when a mobile user enters a Wifi network with a "Captive Portal", in which they need to sign in. I use this blocking function in the background to ensure a connection exists.

/*
 * Not Thread safe. Blocking thread. Returns true if it
 * can connect to URL, false and exception is logged.
 */
public boolean checkConnectionHttps(String url){
    boolean responded = false;
    HttpGet requestTest = new HttpGet(url);
    HttpParams params = new BasicHttpParams();
    HttpConnectionParams.setConnectionTimeout(params, 3000);
    HttpConnectionParams.setSoTimeout(params, 5000);
    DefaultHttpClient client = new DefaultHttpClient(params);
    try {
        client.execute(requestTest);
        responded = true;
    } catch (ClientProtocolException e) {
        Log.w(MainActivity.TAG,"Unable to connect to " + url + " " + e.toString());
    } catch (IOException e) {
        Log.w(MainActivity.TAG,"Unable to connect to " + url + " " + e.toString());
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return responded;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for actually checking end-to-end connectivity. For the "Captive Portal" situation, however, I've found that many will pass the above test even if you haven't signed in - you get the login page and a 200 response no matter what url you ask for. So I attempt to hit a page on my own domain that I know does not exist, and make sure that I get a 404. Alternately, you could hit a known existing page, make sure that you get a 200, and check the content that is returned to make sure that it's what you expect. – GreyBeardedGeek Jul 1 '13 at 20:40

It's works for me. Try it out.

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);
    try {
        URL url = new URL("http://stackoverflow.com/posts/11642475/edit" );
        //URL url = new URL("http://www.nofoundwebsite.com/" );
        executeReq(url);
        Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "Webpage is available!", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
    }
    catch(Exception e) {
        Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "oops! webpage is not available!", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
    }
}

private void executeReq(URL urlObject) throws IOException
{
    HttpURLConnection conn = null;
    conn = (HttpURLConnection) urlObject.openConnection();
    conn.setReadTimeout(30000);//milliseconds
    conn.setConnectTimeout(3500);//milliseconds
    conn.setRequestMethod("GET");
    conn.setDoInput(true);

    // Start connect
    conn.connect();
    InputStream response =conn.getInputStream();
    Log.d("Response:", response.toString());
}}
share|improve this answer
1  
I mean from API level 11, this doesn't work. Reason: developer.android.com/reference/android/os/…. If it works for you, it means you're running this code on old android device. (prior to GB). – 正宗白布鞋 Jun 19 '13 at 14:53

Im using this code instead of the InetAddress :

	try {

		URL url	= new URL("http://"+params[0]);

    	HttpURLConnection urlc = (HttpURLConnection) url.openConnection();
    	urlc.setRequestProperty("User-Agent", "Android Application:"+Z.APP_VERSION);
    	urlc.setRequestProperty("Connection", "close");
    	urlc.setConnectTimeout(1000 * 30); // mTimeout is in seconds
		urlc.connect();
    	if (urlc.getResponseCode() == 200) {
            Main.Log("getResponseCode == 200");
    		return new Boolean(true);
    	}
	} catch (MalformedURLException e1) {
		// TODO Auto-generated catch block
		e1.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
		// TODO Auto-generated catch block
		e.printStackTrace();
	}
share|improve this answer

It is not complex to check Android network / internet connectivity status. The below DetectConnection class will help you to check this status:

import android.content.Context;
import android.net.ConnectivityManager;

public class DetectConnection {
    public static boolean checkInternetConnection(Context context) {
        ConnectivityManager con_manager = (ConnectivityManager) context
                                .getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);

        if (con_manager.getActiveNetworkInfo() != null
            && con_manager.getActiveNetworkInfo().isAvailable()
            && con_manager.getActiveNetworkInfo().isConnected()) {
                return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

For more details visit How to Check Android Network / Internet Connectivity Status

share|improve this answer

For me it was not a good practice to check the connection state in the Activity class, because

ConnectivityManager cm =
    (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);

should be called there, or you need to push down your Activity instance (context) to the connection handler class to able to check the connection state there When no available connection (wifi, network) I catch the UnknownHostException exception:

JSONObject jObj = null;
Boolean responded = false;
HttpGet requestForTest = new HttpGet("http://myserver.com");
try {
    new DefaultHttpClient().execute(requestForTest);
    responded = true;
} catch (UnknownHostException e) {
    jObj = new JSONObject();
    try {
        jObj.put("answer_code", 1);
        jObj.put("answer_text", "No available connection");
    } catch (Exception e1) {}
    return jObj;
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

In this way I can handle this case along with the other cases in the same class (my server always response back with a json string)

share|improve this answer

Best approach:

public static boolean isOnline() {
    try {
    InetAddress.getByName("google.com").isReachable(3);

    return true;
    } catch (UnknownHostException e){
    return false;
    } catch (IOException e){
    return false;
    }
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
I like this approach but I have to point out some things. isReachable() returns a boolean, therefore instead of returning true in the try section, you could do it like boolean connected = InetAddress.getByName("google.com").isReachable(3); then return connected. Also, isReacheable throws IOException and IllegalArgumentException exceptions, therefore itll be a good idea of replacing UnknownHostException with IllegalArgumentException and including a third catch: catch (Exception E). – Yash Jul 26 '13 at 22:12
2  
But then, isReachable uses ICMP which might require root privileges and uses port 7 which usually has no running services on the latest systems. Therefore the best way to check the route to an online service is by regular TCP; hence a down vote. – Yash Jul 26 '13 at 22:44

Following is the code from my Utils class:

public static boolean isNetworkAvailable(Context context) {
        ConnectivityManager connectivityManager 
              = (ConnectivityManager) context.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
        NetworkInfo activeNetworkInfo = connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo();
        return activeNetworkInfo != null && activeNetworkInfo.isConnected();
}
share|improve this answer
public class Network {

Context context;

public Network(Context context){
    this.context = context;
}

public boolean isOnline() {
    ConnectivityManager cm =
            (ConnectivityManager)context.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);

    NetworkInfo activeNetwork = cm.getActiveNetworkInfo();
    return activeNetwork != null &&
                          activeNetwork.isConnectedOrConnecting();
}

}
share|improve this answer

This method gives you the option for a really fast method (for real time feedback) or a slower method (for one off checks that require reliability)

public boolean isNetworkAvailable(bool SlowButMoreReliable) {
    bool Result = false; 
    try {
        if(SlowButMoreReliable){
            ConnectivityManager MyConnectivityManager = null;
            MyConnectivityManager = (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);

            NetworkInfo MyNetworkInfo = null;
            MyNetworkInfo = MyConnectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo();

            Result = MyNetworkInfo != null && MyNetworkInfo.isConnected();

        } else
        {
            Runtime runtime = Runtime.getRuntime();
            Process ipProcess = runtime.exec("/system/bin/ping -c 1 8.8.8.8");

            int i = ipProcess.waitFor();

            Result = i== 0;

        }

    } catch(Exception ex)
    {
        //Common.Exception(ex); //This method is one you should have that displays exceptions in your log
    }
    return Result;
}
share|improve this answer

You can use this method to detect network availability-

public static boolean isDeviceOnline(Context context) {
        boolean isConnectionAvail = false;
        try {
            ConnectivityManager cm = (ConnectivityManager) context
                    .getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
            NetworkInfo netInfo = cm.getActiveNetworkInfo();
            return netInfo.isConnected();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return isConnectionAvail;
    }
share|improve this answer

Just create the following class which checks for an internet connection:

public class ConnectionStatus {

    private Context _context;

    public ConnectionStatus(Context context) {
        this._context = context;
    }

    public boolean isConnectionAvailable() {
        ConnectivityManager connectivity = (ConnectivityManager) _context
                .getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
        if (connectivity != null) {
            NetworkInfo[] info = connectivity.getAllNetworkInfo();
            if (info != null)
                for (int i = 0; i < info.length; i++)
                    if (info[i].getState() == NetworkInfo.State.CONNECTED) {
                        return true;
                    }
        }
        return false;
    }
}

This class simply contains a method which returns the boolean value of the connection status. Therefore in simple terms, if the method finds a valid connection to the Internet, the return value is true, otherwise false if no valid connection is found.

The following method in the MainActivity then calls the result from the method previously described, and prompts the user to act accordingly:

public void addListenerOnWifiButton() {
        Button btnWifi = (Button)findViewById(R.id.btnWifi);

        iia = new ConnectionStatus(getApplicationContext());

        isConnected = iia.isConnectionAvailable();
        if (!isConnected) {
            btnWifi.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {

                @Override
                public void onClick(View v) {
                    startActivity(new Intent(Settings.ACTION_WIFI_SETTINGS));
                    Toast.makeText(getBaseContext(), "Please connect to a hotspot",
                            Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                }
            });
        }
        else {
            btnWifi.setVisibility(4);
            warning.setText("This app may use your mobile data to update events and get their details.");
        }
    }

In the above code, if the result is false, (therefore there is no internet connection, the user is taken to the Android wi-fi panel, where he is prompted to connect to a wi-fi hotspot.

share|improve this answer

Update 29/06/2015 If you are using Xamarin.Android and want to check for connectivity, you can use a Nuget package that would give you this functionality on multiple platforms. Good candidates are here and here. [End of Update]

The Answers above are quite good, but they are all in Java, and almost all of them check for a connectivity. In my case, I needed to have connectivity with a specific type of connection and I am developing on Xamarin.Android. Moreover, I do not pass a reference to my activities Context in the Hardware layer, I use the Application Context. So here is my solution, in case somebody comes here with similar requirements. I have not done full testing though, will update the answer once I am done with my testing

using Android.App;
using Android.Content;
using Android.Net;

namespace Leopard.Mobile.Hal.Android
{
    public class AndroidNetworkHelper
    {
        public static AndroidNetworkStatus GetWifiConnectivityStatus()
        {
            return GetConnectivityStatus(ConnectivityType.Wifi);
        }

        public static AndroidNetworkStatus GetMobileConnectivityStatus()
        {
            return GetConnectivityStatus(ConnectivityType.Mobile);
        }

        #region Implementation

        private static AndroidNetworkStatus GetConnectivityStatus(ConnectivityType connectivityType)
        {
            var connectivityManager = (ConnectivityManager)Application.Context.GetSystemService(Context.ConnectivityService);
            var wifiNetworkInfo = connectivityManager.GetNetworkInfo(connectivityType);
            var result = GetNetworkStatus(wifiNetworkInfo);
            return result;
        }

        private static AndroidNetworkStatus GetNetworkStatus(NetworkInfo wifiNetworkInfo)
        {
            var result = AndroidNetworkStatus.Unknown;
            if (wifiNetworkInfo != null)
            {
                if (wifiNetworkInfo.IsAvailable && wifiNetworkInfo.IsConnected)
                {
                    result = AndroidNetworkStatus.Connected;
                }
                else
                {
                    result = AndroidNetworkStatus.Disconnected;
                }
            }
            return result;
        } 

        #endregion
    }

    public enum AndroidNetworkStatus
    {
        Connected,
        Disconnected,
        Unknown
    }
share|improve this answer

Here is the method I use:

public boolean isNetworkAvailable(final Context context) {
    return ((ConnectivityManager) context.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE)).getActiveNetworkInfo() != null;
}

Even better, check to make sure it is "connected":

publi boolean isNetworkAvailable(final Context context) {
    final ConnectivityManager connectivityManager = ((ConnectivityManager) context.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE));
    return connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo() != null && connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo().isConnected();
}

Here is how to use the method:

if (isNetworkAvailable(context)) {
    // code here
} else {
    // code
}

Permission needed:

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE" />

http://stackoverflow.com/a/16124915/950427

share|improve this answer
public boolean isOnline() {
    boolean var = false;
    ConnectivityManager cm = (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
    if ( cm.getActiveNetworkInfo() != null ) {
        var = true;
    }
    return var;
} 

I have done it this way. A little bit shorter and more readable I guess.

Cheers!

Saiyan

share|improve this answer
public static boolean isNetworkAvailable(Context ctx) {
ConnectivityManager connMgr = (ConnectivityManager)ctx.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
if(connMgr.getNetworkInfo(ConnectivityManager.TYPE_WIFI).isConnected() ||
    connMgr.getNetworkInfo(ConnectivityManager.TYPE_MOBILE).isConnected()){
        return true;
}

return false;
 } 

user this

share|improve this answer

Its so great to have more then one way to code. Here is my example.

ConnectivityManager icheck = getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);

TextView tv = findViewById(R.id.textView1);

boolean wifi = icheck.getActiveNetworkInfo() != null;
        if(wifi) {
        tv.setText("Internet is on.");  
        } else {
             tv.setText("Internet is off.");    
        }

Good luck.

share|improve this answer

This code will help you find the internet is on or not.

public final boolean isInternetOn() {
        ConnectivityManager conMgr = (ConnectivityManager) this.con
                .getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
        NetworkInfo info = conMgr.getActiveNetworkInfo();
        return (info != null && info.isConnected());
}

Also, you should provide the following permissions

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.INTERNET" />
<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE" />
share|improve this answer

The other answers that use ConnectivityManager are wrong because having a network connection doesn't mean you have internet access. For example, the user might be connected to a coffee shop's WiFi portal but can't get to the internet. To check that the internet is accessible you have to try to connect to an actual server. Normally when you want to do this you have a specific server in mind that you want to connect to, so go ahead and check if you can connect to that server. Here's a simple method for checking connectivity to a server.

private boolean isOnTheInternet() {
    try {
        URLConnection urlConnection = new URL("http://yourserver").openConnection();
        urlConnection.setConnectTimeout(400);
        urlConnection.connect();
        return true;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return false;
    }
}

The reason for setting the ConnectTimeout is that otherwise it defaults to the TCP timeout which can be many seconds long.

Note also that Android won't let you run this on your main thread.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.