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I hear people writing these programs all the time and I know what they do, but how do they actually do it? I'm looking for general concepts.

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12 Answers 12

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Technically, screenscraping is any program that grabs the display data of another program and ingests it for it's own use.

Quite often, screenscaping refers to a web client that parses the HTML pages of targeted website to extract formatted data. This is done when a website does not offer an RSS feed or a REST API for accessing the data in a programmatic way.

One example of a library used for this purpose is Hpricot for Ruby, which is one of the better-architected HTML parsers used for screen scraping.

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can this actually parse a url of video within a page? and you can actually get the url of the video and put it in an iframe? –  Vincent Dec 3 '13 at 3:22

Lots of accurate answers here.

What nobody's said is don't do it!

Screen scraping is what you do when nobody's provided you with a reasonable machine-readable interface. It's hard to write, and brittle.

As an example, consider an RSS aggregator, then consider code that gets the same information by working through a normal human-oriented blog interface. Which one breaks when the blogger decides to change their layout?

Of course, sometimes you have no choice :(

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I can't tell if you're talking about me or the 'absence of anybody'. :-) –  Kyle Cronin Oct 1 '08 at 3:49
    
LOL! I think he's refering to you. And I don't think you ever said that. He should be slapped. –  Micah Oct 1 '08 at 10:17

In general a screen scraper is a program that captures output from a server program by mimicing the actions of a person sitting in front of the workstation using a browser or terminal access program. at certain key points the program would interpret the output and then take an action or extract certain amounts of information from the output.

Originally this was done with character/terminal outputs from mainframes for extracting data or updating systems that were archaic or not directly accessible to the end user. in modern terms it usually means parsing the output from an HTTP request to extract data or to take some other action. with the advent of web services this sort of thing should have died away, but not all apps provide a nice api to interact with.

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General idea: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_scraping

Ruby + Python (and I'm sure other languages) have nice libraries for providing high-level, rapid coding.

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If you're interested in particular tools for this task, here is a previous question discussing them.

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In the early days of PC's, screen scrapers would emulate a terminal (e.g. IBM 3270) and pretend to be a user in order to interactively extract, update information on the mainframe. In more recent times, the concept is applied to any application that provides an interface via web pages.

With emergence of SOA, screenscraping is a convenient way in which to services enable applications that aren't. In those cases, the web page scraping is the more common approach taken.

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Here ia a good description of the process and the tools required to do it. http://twmdesign.co.uk/theblog/?p=165

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Here's a tiny bit of screen scraping implemented in Javascript, using jQuery (not a common choice, mind you, since scraping is usually a client-server activity):

//Show My SO Reputation Score
var repval = $('span.reputation-score:first'); alert('StackOverflow User "' + repval.prev().attr('href').split('/').pop() + '" has (' + repval.html() + ') Reputation Points.');

If you run Firebug, copy the above code and paste it into the Console and see it in action right here on this Question page.

If SO changes the DOM structure / element class names / URI path conventions, all bets are off and it may not work any longer - that's the usual risk in screen scraping endeavors where there is no contract/understanding between parties (the scraper and the scrapee [yes I just invented a word]).

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Technically, screenscraping is any program that grabs the display data of another program and ingests it for it's own use.In the early days of PC's, screen scrapers would emulate a terminal (e.g. IBM 3270) and pretend to be a user in order to interactively extract, update information on the mainframe. In more recent times, the concept is applied to any application that provides an interface via web pages.

With emergence of SOA, screenscraping is a convenient way in which to services enable applications that aren't. In those cases, the web page scraping is the more common approach taken.

Quite often, screenscaping refers to a web client that parses the HTML pages of targeted website to extract formatted data. This is done when a website does not offer an RSS feed or a REST API for accessing the data in a programmatic way.

Typically You have an HTML page that contains some data you want. What you do is you write a program that will fetch that web page and attempt to extract that data. This can be done with XML parsers, but for simple applications I prefer to use regular expressions to match a specific spot in the HTML and extract the necessary data. Sometimes it can be tricky to create a good regular expression, though, because the surrounding HTML appears multiple times in the document. You always want to match a unique item as close as you can to the data you need.

Screen scraping is what you do when nobody's provided you with a reasonable machine-readable interface. It's hard to write, and brittle.

As an example, consider an RSS aggregator, then consider code that gets the same information by working through a normal human-oriented blog interface. Which one breaks when the blogger decides to change their layout.

One example of a library used for this purpose is Hpricot for Ruby, which is one of the better-architected HTML parsers used for screen scraping.

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You have an HTML page that contains some data you want. What you do is you write a program that will fetch that web page and attempt to extract that data. This can be done with XML parsers, but for simple applications I prefer to use regular expressions to match a specific spot in the HTML and extract the necessary data. Sometimes it can be tricky to create a good regular expression, though, because the surrounding HTML appears multiple times in the document. You always want to match a unique item as close as you can to the data you need.

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A screen scraper downloads the html page, and pulls out the data interested either by searching for known tokens or parsing it as XML or some such.

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Screen scraping is what you do when nobody's provided you with a reasonable machine-readable interface. It's hard to write, and brittle.

Not quite true. I don't think I'm exaggerating when I say that most developers do not have enough experience to write decents APIs. I've worked with screen scraping companies and often the APIs are so problematic (ranging from cryptic errors to bad results) and often don't give the full functionality that the website provides that it can be better to screen scrape (web scrape if you will). The extranet/website portals are used my more customers/brokers than API clients and thus are better supported. In big companies changes to extranet portals etc.. are infrequent, usually because it was originally outsourced and now its just maintained. I refer more to screen scraping where the output is tailored, e.g. a flight on particular route and time, an insurance quote, a shipping quote etc..

In terms of doing it, it can be as simple as web client to pull the page contents into a string and using a series of regular expressions to extract the information you want.

string pageContents = new WebClient("www.stackoverflow.com").DownloadString();
int numberOfPosts = // regex match

Obviously in a large scale environment you'd be writing more robust code than the above.

A screen scraper downloads the html page, and pulls out the data interested either by searching for known tokens or parsing it as XML or some such.

That is cleaner approach than regex... in theory.., however in practice its not quite as easy, given that most documents will need normalized to XHTML before you can XPath through it, in the end we found the fine tuned regular expressions were more practical.

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