Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to check custom attributes on my class members (fields only) by using an extension method.

public class DatabaseIdAttribute : Attribute
{
    public int ID { get; set; }

    public DatabaseIdAttribute(int id)
    {
        this.ID = id;
    }
}

public class MyClass 
{
    [DatabaseId(1)]
    double Height {get;set;}

    [DatabaseId(2)]
    double Width {get;set;}

    double Area { get { return this.Height * this.Width; }
}

I want to use LINQ expression in the extension method to access the class field instead of passing magic strings.

var myClass = new MyClass();
var attribute = myClass.GetAttribute<DatabaseIdAttribute>(c => c.Height);

Is it possible to achieve?

[EDIT]

For the time being, I have achieved the following with the help of @leppie

    public static MemberInfo GetMember<T, R>(this T instance, Expression<Func<T, R>> selector)
    {
        var member = selector.Body as MemberExpression;
        if (member != null)
        {
            return member.Member;
        }
        return null;
    }

    public static T GetAttribute<T>(this MemberInfo member) where T : Attribute
    {
        return member.GetCustomAttributes(false).OfType<T>().SingleOrDefault();
    }

which enables to get the attribute in the following way

var c = new MyClass();
var attribute = c.GetMember(m => m.Height).GetAttribute<DatabaseIdAttribute>();

but I want to be able to access it in the following way

var c = new MyClass();
var attribute = c.GetAttribute<DatabaseIdAttribute>(m => m.Height);
share|improve this question
2  
Yes, it is possible, and trivial. What have you tried? –  leppie Mar 25 '13 at 5:49
    
Yes, it does seem trivial, but i'm unable to find an example. That is why I asked here. –  RK. Mar 25 '13 at 6:06
    
Do not use object, else there will be a conversion involved. Use an additional generic parameter (ie R). Also, the member could be a PropertyInfo too (which it is in this case). MemberInfo might suffice here if you are only interested in the attribute. –  leppie Mar 25 '13 at 6:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are almost there! This should work (untested).

public static class ObjectExtensions
{
    public static MemberInfo GetMember<T,R>(this T instance, 
         Expression<Func<T, R>> selector)
    {
        var member = selector.Body as MemberExpression;
        if (member != null)
        {
            return member.Member;
        }
        return null;
    }

    public static T GetAttribute<T>(this MemberInfo meminfo) where T : Attribute
    {
       return meminfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(T)).FirstOrDefault() as T;
    }
}

Usage:

var attr = someobject.GetMember(x => x.Height).
              GetAttribute<DatabaseIdAttribute>();

IIRC: GetAttribute<T>(this MemberInfo meminfo) is already defined as an extension method in .NET 4.

share|improve this answer
    
If I am not wrong, we would need three parameters to call this method. I was looking for something like this var myClass = new MyClass(); var attribute = myClass.GetAttribute<DatabaseIdAttribute>(c => c.Height); –  RK. Mar 25 '13 at 7:50
    
@RK: AFAIK, you are right. You could make it 'fluent' to help with that. Will edit answer. –  leppie Mar 25 '13 at 7:55
    
I think that is in .NET 4.5. But I'm also not sure. –  RK. Mar 25 '13 at 8:04

If you don't mind supplying the extra generic types, you can do this:

public static class ReflectionHelper
{
    public static TAttr GetAttribute<TClass, TProp, TAttr>(Expression<Func<TClass, TProp>> selector) where TAttr : Attribute
    {
        var member = selector.Body as MemberExpression;
        return member.Member.GetCustomAttributes<TAttr>(false).First();
    }
}

Then you can use it like this:

var attribute = ReflectionHelper.GetAttribute<MyClass, double, DatabaseIdAttribute>(m => m.Height);

Note that this is not an extension method (as we can't have static extensions) so there is no need to create an instance of your class.

Of course you could still have the extension method version:

public static TAttr GetAttribute<TClass, TProp, TAttr>(this TClass instance, Expression<Func<TClass, TProp>> selector) where TAttr : Attribute
{
   var member = selector.Body as MemberExpression;
   return member.Member.GetCustomAttributes<TAttr>(false).First();
}

Which would let you call it like so:

var c = new MyClass();
var attribute = c.GetAttribute<MyClass, double, DatabaseIdAttribute>(m => m.Height);

But either way is quite verbose. If you want the compile to infer all of the generic types, we'd need to pass in an instance of our attribute:

public static class ReflectionHelper
{
    public static TAttr GetAttribute<TClass, TProp, TAttr>(TAttr attribute, Expression<Func<TClass, TProp>> selector) where TAttr : Attribute
    {
        var member = selector.Body as MemberExpression;
        return member.Member.GetCustomAttributes<TAttr>(false).First();
    }
}

Usage:

var attribute = ReflectionHelper.GetAttribute(new DatabaseIdAttribute(), m => m.Height);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.