Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've been getting some strange outputs from this code upon reading from a large file, the file was printed using a while loop to 99,999 digits however, upon reading the file and printing the contents it only outputs 99,988 lines. Also, is using a ByteBuffer the only option for reading back the file? I've seen some other code using a CharBuffer, but I'm not sure which one I should use, and in what cases I should use them. NOTE: filePath is a Path object pointing to a file on the disk.

    private void byteChannelTrial() throws Exception {
        try (FileChannel channel = (FileChannel) Files.newByteChannel(filePath, READ)) {
            ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(1024);
            String encoding = System.getProperty("file.encoding");
            while (channel.read(buffer) != -1) {
                buffer.rewind();
                System.out.print(Charset.forName(encoding).decode(buffer));
                buffer.clear();
            }
        }
share|improve this question
    
That code should print the entire contents of the file correctly. Is it printing what it does print correctly? and have you considered using a BufferedReader wrapped around an InputStreamReader wrapped around a FileInputStream? – EJP Mar 25 '13 at 7:14
    
Are you counting digits or lines (you mention both)? Also, how are you determining the number of lines written? – Perception Mar 25 '13 at 7:15
    
Every new integer corresponds with a line. So the number count is the line count. – Sarah Szabo Mar 25 '13 at 7:18
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Usually, flip() is called before buffer data is read. the rewind() method does bellowing works:

public final Buffer rewind() {
    position = 0;
    mark = -1;
    return this;
}

it does not set the 'limit' as flip() does:

public final Buffer flip() {
    limit = position;
    position = 0;
    mark = -1;
    return this;
}

So, take a tray using flip() instead of rewind() before reading.

share|improve this answer

For reading text BufferedReader is the best

    try (BufferedReader rdr = Files.newBufferedReader(Paths.get("path"),
            Charset.defaultCharset())) {
        for (String line; (line = rdr.readLine()) != null;) {
            System.out.println(line);
        }
    }

BTW

String encoding = System.getProperty("file.encoding");
Charset.forName(encoding);

is equivalent to

Charset.defaultCharset();
share|improve this answer

Well, it actually turns out that this combination works:

    private void byteChannelTrial() throws Exception {
        try (FileChannel channel = (FileChannel) Files.newByteChannel(this.filePath, READ)) {
            ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(1024);
            while (channel.read(buffer) != -1) {
                buffer.flip();
                System.out.print(Charset.defaultCharset().decode(buffer));
                buffer.clear();
            }
        }
    }

As to why it works, i am not quite certain.

share|improve this answer
    
It works because you are calling flip() instead of rewind(), as per @horaceman's answer. – EJP Mar 26 '13 at 6:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.