Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having some trouble understanding why the following snippet does not give me an error

public void SomeMethod<T>(T arg) where T : MyInterface
{
  MyInterface e = arg;
}

But this one, which I would expect to work due to the generic type constraint

private readonly IList<Action<MyInterface>> myActionList = new List<Action<MyInterface>>();

public IDisposable Subscribe<T>(Action<T> callback) where T: MyInterface
{
  myActionList.Add(callback); // doesn't compile
  return null
}

Gives this error

cannot convert from 'System.Action<T>' to 'System.Action<MyInterface>'

I am using VS2012 sp1 and .NET 4.5.

Can anyone explain why the constraint does not allow this to compile?

share|improve this question
1  
Why is your list readonly, and why new IList? Is that the actual declaration? –  Paolo Tedesco Mar 25 '13 at 9:03
1  
Classes and delegates are not the same thing. System.Action<MyInterface> represents a function with a single parameter of type MyInterface whilst System.Action<T> represents a method with a parameter of type T : MyInterface. The function signatures are not compatible, it is not relevent that T is a derivative of MyInterface, the signature would only be compatible if T was exactly MyInterface. –  odyss-jii Mar 25 '13 at 9:04
    
@PaoloTedesco apologies, it's reconstructed and simplified from some other code. Copy/Paste error –  Jim Jeffries Mar 25 '13 at 9:18
    
@jamesj: no problem, thanks for fixing it, and good question btw :) –  Paolo Tedesco Mar 25 '13 at 9:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Classes and delegates are not the same thing. System.Action<MyInterface> represents a function with a single parameter of type MyInterface whilst System.Action<T> represents a method with a parameter of type T : MyInterface. The function signatures are not compatible, it is not relevent that T is a derivative of MyInterface, the signature would only be compatible if T was exactly MyInterface.

share|improve this answer

This is a contravariance issue - an Action<MyInterface> should be able to take any MyInterface instance as an argument, however you are trying to store an Action<T> where T is some subtype of MyInterface, which is not safe.

For example if you had:

public class SomeImpl : MyInterface { }
public class SomeOtherImpl : MyInterface { }
List<Action<MyInterface>> list;

list.Add(new Action<SomeImpl>(i => { }));
ActionMyInterface act = list[0];
act(new SomeOtherImpl());

You can only assign an Action<T> to some Action<U> if the type T is 'smaller' than the type U. For example

Action<string> act = new Action<object>(o => { });

is safe since a string argument is always valid where an object argument is.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for explanation with example. –  nawfal Apr 19 '13 at 19:21

The where T: MyInterface constraint means "any instance of any class or struct which implements MyInterface".

So what you are trying to do can be simplified as this:

Action<IList> listAction = null;
Action<IEnumerable> enumAction = listAction;

Which is not supposed to work, while still IList : IEnumerable. More details can be found here:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/2010/02/16/covariance-and-contravariance-faq.aspx http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd799517.aspx

So if you really need to use generic and not just interface - you can do it like this, though it adds complexity and minor performance issues:

public static IDisposable Subscribe<T>(Action<T> callback) where T : MyInterface
{
    myActionList.Add(t => callback((T)t)); // this compiles and work
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer

Classes and delegates behave a little different. Let's see a simple example:

public void SomeMethod<T>(T arg) where T : MyInterface
{
  MyInterface e = arg;
}

In this method you could assume that T would be at least MyInterface, so you could do something like this MyInterface e = arg; because args always could be cast to MyInterface.

Now let's see how delegates behave:

public class BaseClass { };
public class DerivedClass : BaseClass { };
private readonly IList<Action<BaseClass >> myActionList = new List<Action<BaseClass>>();

public void Subscribe<T>(Action<T> callback) where T: BaseClass
{
  myActionList.Add(callback); // so you could add more 'derived' callback here Action<DerivedClass>
  return null;
}

Now we'r adding DerivedClass callback to myActionList and then somewhere you invoke delegates:

foreach( var action in myActionList ) {
   action(new BaseClass);
}

But you can't do that, because if you have DerivedClass callback you have to pass it DerivedClass as parameter.

This question refers to Covariance and contravariance. You could read about variance from this article, also Eric Lippert has very intersting articles about variance, this is the first article, you can find the rest in his blog.

P.S. Edited accorind to Lee comment.

share|improve this answer
    
Classes cannot be covariant - only delegates and interfaces can have variance annotations. It's also misleading to say delegates 'have' contravariance - the Func delegate types are contravariant in their arguments and covariant in their return types. Contravariance is not restricted to delegate types, see the IObserver<T> interface for example, which is contravariant in T. –  Lee Mar 25 '13 at 9:58
    
I have edited my post, thank you. –  Andrew Mar 25 '13 at 11:53

I find it helpful in these situations to consider what goes wrong if you allow the behaviour. So let's consider that.

interface IAnimal { void Eat(); }
class Tiger : IAnimal 
{ 
  public void Eat() { ... }
  public void Pounce() { ... } 
}
class Giraffe : IAnimal 
...
public void Subscribe<T>(Action<T> callback) where T: IAnimal
{
   Action<IAnimal> myAction = callback; // doesn't compile but pretend it does.
   myAction(new Giraffe()); // Obviously legal; Giraffe implements IAnimal
}
...
Subscribe<Tiger>((Tiger t)=>{ t.Pounce(); });

So what happens? We create a delegate that takes a tiger and pounces, pass that to Subscribe<Tiger>, convert that to Action<IAnimal>, and pass a giraffe, which then pounces.

Obviously that has to be illegal. The only place where it is sensible to make it illegal is the conversion from Action<Tiger> to Action<IAnimal>. So that's where it is illegal.

share|improve this answer

If T is limited to a certain interface anyway, you could just use that interface in its stead:

public void SomeMethod(MyInterface arg)
{
  MyInterface e = arg;
}

private readonly IList<Action<MyInterface>> myActionList = new IList<Action<MyInterface>>();

public IDisposable Subscribe(Action<MyInterface> callback)
{
  myActionList.Add(callback); // does compile
  return null
}

Will work and compile and is practically the same as what you have now.

Generics are useful if you want to do the same operation REGARDLESS of the type, if you then limit the type to some interface you have defeated the purpose of generics and should probably just use that interface instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess he wants to be able to pass subtypes of that specific interface.. eg. MyOtherInterface : MyInterface –  Roger Alsing Mar 25 '13 at 9:13
    
@Roger that might be true, I did not get that from the OP but I do admit it's an approach I did not consider either. –  Bazzz Mar 25 '13 at 9:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.