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When using a using block for SQL connections in C#, does this also a close method? I'm asking as I need to explicitly use the con.Open() method. I found this example:

using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
   con.Open(); // open method

   string queryString = "select * from db";
   SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(queryString, con);
   SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();
   reader.Read();

   ???         // What about a close method?
}

Or does the using block close the connection itself?

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marked as duplicate by Benjamin Gale, mattytommo, Frank Schmitt, Signare, mdm Mar 25 '13 at 12:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
using will call Dispose of connection and Dispose will call Close. –  Daniil Mar 25 '13 at 10:05
    
so when Im using it, using will close all connetions. All connections means global, or only this connections in this method/class where it is? –  mnlfischer Mar 25 '13 at 10:08
    
@ManuelFischer only connection in statement using(SqlConnection iWillDisposeConn = new... –  Daniil Mar 25 '13 at 10:11
    
You should really have your command and reader in using blocks also - they're disposable too. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 25 '13 at 10:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

using translates to:

SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(connectionString)
try
{
   con.Open(); <-- open method

   string queryString = "select * from db";
   SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(queryString, con);
   SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();
   reader.Read();
}
finally
{
    if (con!= null)
        ((IDisposable)con).Dispose();
}

where ((IDisposable)con.Dispose(); closes what is to be closed.

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great, thank you! –  mnlfischer Mar 25 '13 at 10:10

You don't have to close it - using is enough. MSDN says:

To ensure that connections are always closed, open the connection inside of a using block, as shown in the following code fragment. Doing so ensures that the connection is automatically closed when the code exits the block.

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No, you don't have to call the Close-Method of the SqlConnection. When it gets disposed on the end of the using, it closes automatically. (The Dispose-Method calls Close()) [1]

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The other answers are correct, however, I want to be a bit more explicit.
The MSDN states the following:

Close and Dispose are functionally equivalent.

Because using using will call Dispose a separate call to Close is not needed.

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when you use the 'using' keyword and create a connection in it . the connection is open as far as there is the scope of the 'using' keyword when closing bracket is reached the connection is closed automatically as it was defined within a scope and the scope is not in exist

in other words treat it as the local variable which can be accessed within the scope only. hope this will help.

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