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Is there any way to print the first N words of a file? I've tried cut but it reads a document line-by-line. The only solution I came up with is:

sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/\n/δ/g' file | cut -d " " -f -20 | sed 's/δ/\n/g'

Essentially, replacing newlines with a character that doesn't not exist in the file, applying "cut" with space as delimiter and then restoring the newlines.

Is there any better solution?

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Define a "word" and post some sample input ad expected output. – Ed Morton Mar 25 '13 at 15:41

Assuming words are non-white space separated by white space, you can use tr to convert the document to one-word-per-line format and then count the first N lines:

tr -s ' \011' '\012' < file | head -n $N

where N=20 or whatever value you want for the number of words. Note that tr is a pure filter; it only reads from standard input and only writes to standard output. The -s option 'squeezes' out duplicate replacements, so you get one newline per sequence of blanks or tabs in the input. (If there is leading white space in the file, you get an initial blank line. There are various ways to deal with that, such as grab the first N+1 lines out output after all, or filter out all blank lines.)

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Also: tr -s [[:space:]] \\n. – William Pursell Mar 25 '13 at 15:07

You could use awk to print the first n words:

$ awk 'NR<=8{print;next}{exit}' RS='[[:blank:]]+|\n' file

This would print the first 8 words. Each word is output on a separate line, are you looking to keep the original format of the file?

Edit:

The following will preserve the original format of the file:

awk -v n=8 'n==c{exit}n-c>=NF{print;c+=NF;next}{for(i=1;i<=n-c;i++)printf "%s ",$i;print x;exit}' file

Demo:

$ cat file
one two
thre four five six
seven 8 9 
10

$ awk -v n=8 'n==c{exit}n-c>=NF{print;c+=NF;next}{for(i=1;i<=n-c;i++)printf "%s ",$i;print x;exit}' file
one two
thre four five six
seven 8 

A small caveat: if the last line printed doesn't use a single space as a separator this line will lose it's formatting.

$ cat file 
one     two
thre     four five six
seven        8 9 
10

# the 8th word fell on 3rd line: this line will be formatted with single spaces
$ awk -v n=8 'n==c{exit}n-c>=NF{print;c+=NF;next}{for(i=1;i<=n-c;i++)printf "%s ",$i;print x;exit}' file
one     two
thre     four five six
seven 8
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Yes, I would like to preserve the original format. – Nick Mar 25 '13 at 11:48
    
@Nick see new solution for preserving output format. – iiSeymour Mar 25 '13 at 13:58

One way with perl:

perl -lane 'push @a,@F;END{print "@a[0..9]"}' file

Note: indexing starts at zero so the example will print the first ten words. The words will be printed on a single line separated by a single space.

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What if there are newlines included in the first N words? Will they be replaced by spaces? – Nick Mar 25 '13 at 11:52
    
@Nick yes, currently no answers preserves the original file format. – iiSeymour Mar 25 '13 at 11:54

Using GNU awk so we can set the RS to a regexp and access the matching string using RT:

$ cat file
the quick
brown     fox     jumped over
the
lazy
dog's back

$ gawk -v c=3 -v RS='[[:space:]]+' 'NR<=c{ORS=(NR<c?RT:"\n");print}' file
the quick
brown

$ gawk -v c=6 -v RS='[[:space:]]+' 'NR<=c{ORS=(NR<c?RT:"\n");print}' file
the quick
brown     fox     jumped over

$ gawk -v c=9 -v RS='[[:space:]]+' 'NR<=c{ORS=(NR<c?RT:"\n");print}' file
the quick
brown     fox     jumped over
the
lazy
dog's
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Why not try turning your words into lines, and then just using head -n 20 instead?

For example:

for i in `cat somefile`; do echo $i; done | head -n 20

It's not elegant, but it does have considerably less line-noise regex.

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1  
That reads the whole file into memory, which doesn't matter if the files are small, but would if they're large. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 25 '13 at 10:25
    
You're very right. It is also rather fragile with respect to exactly how bash chooses to interpret whitespace as delimiters. – Gian Mar 25 '13 at 10:28
2  
It would also fail in cryptic ways if the file names contained globbing wildcard characters or started with a minus sign or.... – Ed Morton Mar 25 '13 at 15:43
    
Also true. I figured I would merely suggest one approach that might work as a quick-and-dirty way to achieve the outcome for particular kinds of input. – Gian Mar 25 '13 at 22:11

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