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I'm using Microsoft's Visual Studio unit testing framework (the project does therefore I have to). I'm sorely missing some of the more advanced assertions such as AreElementsEqual you find in MBUnit.

I'd like to make them.

As the class is static I can't inherit from it (to create a SuperAssert) and I can't add an extension method (as they're static methods).

I don't want to simply create another class and expect consumers to use the two different ones. How can I expand the class?

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I can't add an Extension Method (as they're static methods). why? could you give some code example on why you can't add Extension methods? –  Ilya Ivanov Mar 25 '13 at 11:04
2  
For AreElementsEqual, have you checked that CollectionAssert doesn't meet your needs? –  Jon Skeet Mar 25 '13 at 11:05
2  
@IlyaIvanov: You simply can't add an extension method that can be called on class name as opposed to an instance. I don't see what you need a code sample for - or what it should show. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 25 '13 at 11:06
    
@DanielHilgarth you mean non-static method? Extension methods are static methods, which can be used to extend\add more behavior, which I guess OP wants. –  Ilya Ivanov Mar 25 '13 at 11:07
    
@IlyaIvanov: Extension methods are static methods. That's correct. But they can only be called on instances of an object, not on a type name. Example: You can't create an extension method that allows this code: int.MyExtension(). You can only create one that can be called like this: int i = 0; i.MyExtension();. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 25 '13 at 11:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't. You will have to create a new one.

Or you could create an existing package, like Fluent Assertions.

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As the class is static, you cannot as you say, use extension methods to 'add' further methods to the class.

The closest you can do within reason is the following:

public static class AssertExtensions
{
    public static void SuperAssert(bool expression)
    {
        // etc...
    }
}

If you are producing a tool library, asking the user to use another class should not be a problem.

If you are still concerned, why not create a base class for your test and have the users use methods within that for asserts?

For instance:

public class TestBase
{
    protected void AreEqual(object obj1, object obj2)
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(obj1, obj2); // etc...
    }

    protected void SuperAssert(bool expression)
    {
        // etc...
    }
}
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