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In our MVC project we are attempting to make everything as generic as possible.

Because of this we want to have one authentication class/method which covers all our methods.

As a example: The following code is a MVC class which can be called to from a client

public class Test
{
    public void Test()
    {
    } 

    public int Test2(int i)
    {
         return i
    }

    public void Test3(string i)
    {
    }
}

A customer of our webservice can use a service reference to get access to Test(), Test2() and Test3().

Now i'm searching for a class, model, interface or anything else which I can use to alter the access to the method (Currently using [PrincipalPermission] attribute) as well as alter the parameter value.

Example:

Customer A calls Test2(150)

The class/method checks whether Customer A has access to Test2. The class/method validates the user but notices that the user does not have access to 150. He only has access to 100.So the class/method sets the parameter to 100 and lets it follow through on it's journey.

Customber B class Test()

The class/method checks whether Customer B has access to Test. After validation it shows that the user does not have access so it throws a SecurityException.

My question:

In what class, interface, attribute or whatever can I best do this?

(ps. As example i've only used authentication and parameter handling, but we plan to do a lot more in this stage.)

Edit

I notice most, if not all, assume I'm using actionResults. So i'd like to state that this is used in a webservice where we provide our customers with information from our database. In no way will we come in contact with a ActionResult during the requests to our webservice. (Atleast, not our customers)

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Why don't you use the Authorize attribute? codeproject.com/Articles/288631/… –  Simon Mourier Mar 30 '13 at 8:18
    
Because the project doesn't have a context (It's a webservice) –  Theun Arbeider Apr 2 '13 at 7:29
    
you can still use an authorization attribute. you would have to create a custom auth attribute, but it can be done. are you using Web API? –  Dave Alperovich Apr 4 '13 at 4:53

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

Authentication can also be done through an aspect. The aspect oriented paradigm is designed to honor those so-called cross-cutting concerns. Cross-cutting concerns implemented in the "old-fashioned" oo-way make your business logic harder to read (like in Nick's example above) or even worse to understand, because they don't bring any "direct" benefit to your code:

public ActionResult YourAction(int id) {
  if (!CustomerCanAccess(id)) {
    return new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
  }

  /* the rest of your code */
}

The only thing you want here is /* the rest of your code */ and nothing more.

Stuff like logging, exception handling, caching and authorization for example could be implemented as an aspect and thus be maintained at one single point.

PostSharp is an example for an aspect-oriented C# framework. With PostSharp you could create a custom aspect and then annotate your method (like you did with the PrincipalPermissionAttribute). PostSharp will then weave your aspect code into your code during compilation. With the use of PostSharp aspects it would be possible to hook into the method invocation authenticating the calling user, changing method parameters or throw custom exceptions (See this blog post for a brief explanation how this is implemented).

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In this scenario we have to implement the same piece of code on every method in our webservice, which is what we want to avoid by putting it in a generalized section. –  Theun Arbeider Apr 2 '13 at 6:47
    
@TheunArbeider No you won't. AOP is designed to avoid code duplication on cross-cutting concerns. Can you explain what you mean by implementing the same piece of code on every method? –  Peit Apr 2 '13 at 6:59
    
We're hosting a webservice with atleast 16 different methods. In order you check them all whether they are authorized, as I read your comment, I need to place if(!CustomerCanAccess(id)) in every method. –  Theun Arbeider Apr 2 '13 at 7:10
    
@TheunArbeider No, you misunderstood me. What I wanted to state here is that you don't want to do stuff like this. Have a look at some PostSharp examples. Using PostSharp you will have to implement an aspect and just annotate your methods, classes or even assemblies with attributes like you did with [PrincipalPermission] before. AOP is designed to avoid putting such code in every method making your code unmaintainable. –  Peit Apr 2 '13 at 7:13
    
@TheunArbeider I forgot to mention that PostSharp or AOP will not only work in a web environment nor is it bound to the use of any ActionResult deriving return type at all. –  Peit Apr 2 '13 at 7:37

There isn't a built-in attribute that handles this scenario.

I find it's usually best to just do something like this:

public ActionResult YourAction(int id) {
  if (!CustomerCanAccess(id)) {
    return new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
  }

  /* the rest of your code */
}

This is as simple as it gets and easy to extend. I think you'll find that in many cases this is all you need. It also keeps your security assertions testable. You can write a unit test that simply calls the method (without any MVC plumbing), and checks whether the caller was authorized or not.

Note that if you are using ASP.Net Forms Authentication, you may also need to add:

Response.SuppressFormsAuthenticationRedirect = true;

if you don't want your users to be redirected to the login page when they attempt to access a resource for which they are not authorized.

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Using the approach of @NickAceves there is no reason why you could not utilize value 100 (as a fallthrough or default) when it turns out that the user 'cannot access' 150 -- rather than returning the Unauthorized result. There is some slight ambiguity in your post, because these values look like entity PK values on one hand, but feel like 'level-of-access' values on the other hand. –  David Tansey Mar 29 '13 at 17:30

Here's how I've made my life simpler.

  1. Never use simple values for action arguments. Always create a class that represents the action arguments. Even if there's only one value. I've found that I usually end up being able to re-use this class.
  2. Make sure that all of teh properties of this class are nullable (this keeps you from running into default values (0 for integers) being automatically filles out) and thatallowable ranges are defined (this makes sure you don't worry about negative numbers)
  3. Once you have a class that represents your arguments, throwing a validator onto a property ends up being trivial.

The thing is that you're not passing a meaningless int. It has a purpose, it could be a product number, an account number, etc. Create a class that has that as a property (e.g An AccountIdentifier class with a single field called 'id). Then all you have to do is create a [CurrentUsedCanAccessAccountId] attribute and place it on that property.

All your controller has to do is check whether or not ModelState.IsValid and you're done.

There are more elegant solutions out there, such as adding an action filter to the methods that would automatically re-direct based on whether or not the user has access to a specific value for the parameter, but this will work rather well

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I don't see how this helps me. I'm asking about MVC layers and you talking about validation in a class... –  Theun Arbeider Mar 26 '13 at 13:07
2  
I'll be honest - I think that's terrible advice (and it doesn't address the question). If your action only needs to take a single integer, why on earth would you make an entire class just for that action's arguments? That just seems plainly unnecessary. –  Nick Aceves Mar 29 '13 at 13:33

First, just to say it, that your own methods are probably the most appropriate place to handle input values (adjust/discard) - and with the addition of Authorize and custom filter actions you can get most done, and the 'MVC way'. You could also go the 'OO way' and have your ITest interface, dispatcher etc. (you get more compiler support - but it's more coupled). However, let's just presume that you need something more complex...

I'm also assuming that your Test is a controller - and even if it isn't it can be made part of the 'pipeline' (or by mimicking what MVC does), And with MVC in mind...

One obvious solution would be to apply filters, or action filters via ActionFilterAttribute Class (like Authorize etc.) - by creating your own custom attribute and overriding OnActionExecuting etc.

And while that is fine, it's not going to help much with parameters manipulation as you'd have to specify the code 'out of place' - or somehow inject delegates, lambda expressions for each attribute.

It is basically an interceptor of some sort that you need - which allows you to attach your own processing. I've done something similar - but this guy did a great job explaining and implementing a solution - so instead of me repeating most of that I'd suggest just to read through that.

ASP.NET MVC controller action with Interceptor pattern (by Amar, I think)

What that does is to use existing MVC mechanisms for filters - but it exposes it via a different 'interface' - and I think it's much easier dealing with inputs. Basically, what you'd do is something like...

[ActionInterceptor(InterceptionOrder.Before, typeof(TestController), "Test1")]
public void OnTest1(InterceptorParasDictionary<string, object> paras, object result)

The parameters and changes are propagated, you have a context of a sort so you can terminate further execution - or let both methods do their work etc.

What's also interesting - is the whole pattern - which is IOC of a sort - you define the intercepting code in another class/controller all together - so instead of 'decorating' your own Test methods - attributes and most of the work are placed outside.

And to change your parameters you'd do something like...

// I'd create/wrap my own User and make this w/ more support interfaces etc.
if (paras.Count > 0 && Context.User...) 
{
    (paras["id"] as int) = 100;
}            

And I'm guessing you could further change the implementation for your own case at hand.

That's just a rough design - I don't know if the code there is ready for production (it's for MVC3 but things are similar if not the same), but it's simplistic enough (when explained) and should work fine with some minor adjustments on your side.

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I'm not sure if I understood your question, but it looks like a model binder can help.

Your model binder can have an interface injected that is responsible for determining if a user has permissions or not to a method, and in case it is needed it can change the value provided as a parameter.

ValueProviders, that implement the interface IValueProvider, may also be helpful in your case.

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I have tried the model binder but it only seems to work on a post. Since my question refers to a webservice there will never be a post and thus the model binder will never be triggered –  Theun Arbeider Apr 2 '13 at 6:48
    
Model binders do work with GET. –  uvita Apr 2 '13 at 14:15
    
Can you provide me with a example? –  Theun Arbeider Apr 3 '13 at 10:15

I believe the reason you haven't gotten ay good enough answer is because there are a few ambiguities in your question. First, you say you have an MVC class that is called from a client and yet you say there are no ActionResults. So you would do well to clarify if you are using asp.net mvc framework, web api, wcf service or soap (asmx) web service. If my assumption is right and you are using asp.net mvc framework, how are you defining web services without using action results and how does your client 'call' this service. I am not saying it is impossible or that what you may have done is wrong, but a bit more clarity (and code) would help.

My advice if you are using asp.net mvc3 would be to design it so that you use controllers and actions to create your web service. all you would need to do would be to return Json, xml or whatever else your client expects in an action result.

If you did this, then I would suggest you implement your business logic in a class much like the one you have posted in your question. This class should have no knowledge of you authentication or access level requirements and should concentrate solely on implementing the required business logic and producing correct results.

You could then write a custom action filter for your action methods which could inspect the action parameter and determine if the caller is authenticated and authorized to actually access the method. Please see here for how to write a custom action filter.

If you think this sounds like what you want and my assumptions are correct, let me know and I will be happy to post some code to capture what I have described above. If I have gone off on a tangent, please clarify the questions and we might be one step closer to suggesting a solution.

p.s. An AOP 'way of thinking' is what you need. PostSharp as an AOP tool is great, but I doubt there is anything postsharp will do for you here that you cannot achieve with a slightly different architecture and proper use of the features of asp.net mvc.

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first create an attribute by inheriting from ActionFilterAttribute (system.web.mvc) then override OnActionExecuting method and check if user has permission or not

this the example

    public class CheckLoginAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        if (!Membership.IslogedIn)
        {
            filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(new RouteValueDictionary
                                {
                                   { "area",""},
                                   { "action", "login" },
                                   { "controller", "user" },
                                   { "redirecturl",filterContext.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.RawUrl}
                               });
        }
    }
}

and then, use this attribute for every method you need to check user permission

public class Test
{
    [ChecklLogin]
    public void Test()
    {
    } 
    [ChecklLogin]
    public int Test2(int i)
    {
         return i
    }
    [ChecklLogin]
    public void Test3(string i)
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
you are redirecting a webservice? –  Dave Alperovich Apr 4 '13 at 4:52
1  
Oh, it's my mistake to add an action filter attribute on a void method. it works only on methods which return ActionResult in an asp.net mvc controller –  Rabolf Apr 4 '13 at 7:24

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