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I'm working on a game and I came across a little problem with my scanner. I'm getting a resource leak scanner never closed.

But I thought my scanner was working before without closing it. But now it ain't. Anyone can help me out here?

Thanks in advance.

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Main {

    public static final boolean CHEAT = true;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
        int amountOfPlayers;
        do {
            System.out.print("Select the amount of players (1/2): ");
            while (!scanner.hasNextInt()) {
                System.out.println("That's not a number!");
                scanner.next(); // this is important!
            }

            amountOfPlayers = scanner.nextInt();
        } while ((amountOfPlayers <= 0) || (amountOfPlayers > 2));
        System.out.println("You've selected " + amountOfPlayers+" player(s).");




    }

}
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2  
How can you tell that your scanner isn't working anymore? What behaviour do you see? –  Pieter Kuijpers Mar 25 '13 at 11:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I am assuming you are using java 7, thus you get a compiler warning, when you don't close the resourse you should close your scanner usually in a finally block.

Scanner scanner= null;
try {
 scanner= new Scanner(System.in);
    //rest of the code
}
finally {
if(scanner!=null)
scanner.close();
}

or even better use the new Try with resource statement:

try(Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in)){

//rest of your code
}
share|improve this answer
    
Should new Scanner(System.in) be surrounded with try-catch block? –  Maroun Maroun Mar 25 '13 at 11:23
    
@MarounMaroun not necessarily. but its a good practice to close your resouces inside a finally block. –  PermGenError Mar 25 '13 at 11:24
1  
Thanks, realy like the Try with resource statement, works like a charm! –  Niek van der Linden Mar 25 '13 at 11:28
2  
Why are you closing System.in by yourself? It is the job of the jvm at shutdown. –  Eng.Fouad Mar 25 '13 at 11:36
1  
@Eng.Fouad - Then why does eclipse keep throwing the warning ? It makes me wonder if I am doing something wrong. –  Borat Sagdiyev May 4 '14 at 22:19

According to the Javadoc of Scanner, it closes the stream when you call it's close method. Generally speaking, the code that creates a resource is also responsible for closing it. System.in was not instantiated by by your code, but by the VM. So in this case it's safe to not close the Scanner, ignore the warning and add a comment why you ignore it. The VM will take care of closing it if needed.

(Offtopic: instead of "amount", the word "number" would be more appropriate to use for a number of players. English is not my native language (I'm Dutch) and I used to make exactly the same mistake.)

share|improve this answer

Try this

Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
int amountOfPlayers;
do {
    System.out.print("Select the amount of players (1/2): ");
    while (!scanner.hasNextInt()) {
        System.out.println("That's not a number!");
        scanner.next(); // this is important!
    }

    amountOfPlayers = scanner.nextInt();
} while ((amountOfPlayers <= 0) || (amountOfPlayers > 2));
if(scanner != null) {
    scanner.close();
}
System.out.println("You've selected " + amountOfPlayers+" player(s).");
share|improve this answer

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