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I was trying to write a function with a variable number of arguments which do something for all its number entries. so I came up with something like this:

function luaFunc (...)
   for i,v in ipairs{...} do
      if type(v)=='number' then
         --do something
      end
   end
end

but when i run this, it stops right on first non-number argument. whats the problem?

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3  
It stops at the first nil argument not at the first non-number argument. –  lhf Mar 25 '13 at 12:25
    
thats right, thank you lhf. –  VahidM Mar 25 '13 at 13:36
1  
if you read the docs for ipairs, it specifically tells you that it does this. i think what you are looking for here is the pairs function, which iterates all keys in a table (not necessarily in order). –  Mike Corcoran Mar 25 '13 at 16:26
    
@MikeCorcoran, thank you. that's simply the solution. –  VahidM Mar 25 '13 at 21:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
local function luaFunc (...)
   for i = 1, select('#',...) do
      local v = select(i,...)
      if type(v)=='number' then
         --do something
         print(v)
      end
   end
end
luaFunc (1,'a',nil,2)     ]

-- Output
1
2
share|improve this answer
    
that works well, thank you. –  VahidM Mar 25 '13 at 13:45

Try also this:

function luaFunc (...)
   local t=table.pack(...)
   for i=1,t.n do
      local v=t[i]
      if type(v)=='number' then
         print(i,v)
      end
   end
end

luaFunc(10,20,"hello",40,nil,60,print,99)
share|improve this answer
    
also useful. thank you. btw why should the iteration with ipairs not work? the element has a key and has a value which is nil .. –  VahidM Mar 25 '13 at 15:54
1  
@VahidM, ipairs uses the # operator on the table to determine how many elements it has but # is not useful for tables with holes (nil entries). –  lhf Mar 25 '13 at 16:05
    
I've just tested # operator for a table with nil entries and it worked fine. It must be something else. thank you anyway. –  VahidM Mar 25 '13 at 16:26
    
@VahidM, try N=100; t={}; for i=1,N do t[i]=i end; t[64]=nil; print(#t). –  lhf Mar 25 '13 at 16:50

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