Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have two classes I want to store in EF Code First. A Building has a maintainer, and a list of people working there. The mainainer doesn't have to work in the building.

At my first attempt I just had

public class Person
    {
        public virtual Guid Id { get; set; }
        public virtual string Name { get; set; }

    }

and

public class Building
{
    public virtual  Guid Id { get; set; }
    public virtual List<Person> WorksHere { get; set; }

    public virtual Person MaintainedBy { get; set; }
    public virtual String Address { get; set; }
}

This gives me two tables with the base properties, and a Building_Id on People, and a MaintainedBy_Id on Buildings.

When I run a test program

        using (TestContext tc = new TestContext())
        {
            Person m1 = tc.persons.Create();
            m1.Name = "maintainB1";
            m1.Id = Guid.NewGuid();

            Person m2 = tc.persons.Create();
            m2.Name = "maintainB2";
            m2.Id = Guid.NewGuid();

            Building b1 = tc.buildings.Create();
            b1.Address = "building1";
            b1.Id = Guid.NewGuid();
            tc.buildings.Add(b1);

            Building b2 = tc.buildings.Create();
            b2.Address = "building1";
            b2.Id = Guid.NewGuid();
            tc.buildings.Add(b2);

            b1.MaintainedBy = m1;
            b2.MaintainedBy = m2;

            if (b1.WorksHere == null) b1.WorksHere = new List<Person>();
            if (b2.WorksHere == null) b2.WorksHere = new List<Person>();


            b1.WorksHere.AddRange(new List<String>() { "e11", "e12", "e13" }.Select(s =>
            {
                Person p = new Person();
                p.Id = Guid.NewGuid();
                p.Name = s;
                return p;
            }));

            b2.WorksHere.AddRange(new List<String>() { "e21", "e22", "e23" }.Select(s =>
            {
                Person p = new Person();
                p.Id = Guid.NewGuid();
                p.Name = s;
                return p;
            }));


            b1.WorksHere.Add(m2);
            b2.WorksHere.Add(m1);
            tc.SaveChanges();
        }

    }

I get an exception: "An error occurred while saving entities that do not expose foreign key properties for their relationships. The EntityEntries property will return null because a single entity cannot be identified as the source of the exception. Handling of exceptions while saving can be made easier by exposing foreign key properties in your entity types. See the InnerException for details."

with innerexception: "Unable to determine a valid ordering for dependent operations. Dependencies may exist due to foreign key constraints, model requirements, or store-generated values."

I would prefer not to expose any more properties on my Poco's, because, well, they are Poco's, and I have no use for those properties. If I have to to satisfy Code First model generation, than that'll have to do, but if at all possible, I'd like to have that away from my Poco's in a mapping class.

How do I fix this?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

So, this issue arises because you have a circular relationship between your entities, which causes EF to give up when trying to resolve all the inserts in a single call to SaveChanges, and raise the exception you are seeing.

To understand why it can't handle this situation, lets think about what happens in the database when trying to save the entities.

Using your code, you can make it run without errors by commenting out the last line before SaveChanges is called, but then person m1 won't be working in building b2, so this is not what you want.

b1.WorksHere.Add(m2);
//b2.WorksHere.Add(m1); <-- When this is removed it works.. 
tc.SaveChanges();

However, EF is able to run this by creating the following inserts in the database:

  1. Insert person m1. Leave the FK to the buildings table as null, because m1 works nowhere.
  2. Insert building 'b1'. Use id of ´m1´ as the FK, because m1 maintains b1.
  3. Insert person m2. Use id of b1 as the FK, because b1 is where m2 works.
  4. Insert building b2. Use id of m2 as the FK, because m2 maintains b2.

Now it's pretty easy to see why it doesn't work when you include the line that makes m1 work in b2.
In the first insert above, EF isn't able to leave the FK as null, because you are telling it that it needs to point to a building, but that building has not been inserted yet, so it can't create the FK pointing back to it.
That is always a problem in EF when entities have circular dependencies. When both depend on each other, the inserts can't be created in a single commit.

The solution to your problem is simply to make two calls to SaveChanges. If you call it right before making m1 work in b2, and then again after that, you will get the right kind of behavior.

b1.WorksHere.Add(m2);
tc.SaveChanges(); <-- Create inserts. FK in m1 is null because he works nowhere yet.
b2.WorksHere.Add(m1);
tc.SaveChanges(); <-- Updates FK in m1 to point to b2.

Future support in Entity Framework
It seems like this issue will be resolved in a future version of EF.

It is reasonable to expect from a ORM that it should be able to handle inserting a parent, inserting a child and then updating the parent with the newly created child id.

You can read more about it and vote for the feature to be implemented on Microsoft Connect.

There is also some info on the EF CodePlex site.

share|improve this answer

Try mapping the relationship. In your context which is derived from DbContext, override the OnModelCreating method:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder mb)
{
    mb.Entity<Building>()
        .HasMany(m => m.LivesHere)
        .WithRequired()
        .Map(n => n.MapKey("Home_Id"));
}

I would also try using [Key] to denote the the primary keys in the Entities, but I'm not exactly sure if you have to do that.

Like so:

public class Building
{
    [Key]
    public virtual  Guid Id { get; set; }
    public virtual List<Person> WorksHere { get; set; }

    public virtual Person MaintainedBy { get; set; }
    public virtual String Address { get; set; }
}

I can't try this out right now, but I hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.