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Suppose I have a few adjacent elements:

<div class="container">
  <div>1</div>
  <div>2</div>
  <div>3</div>
  <div>4</div>
  <div>5</div>
  <div>6</div>
</div>

styled with the following:

.container > div {
  display:inline-block;
  white-space:nowrap;
}

Since we're using display:inline-block, the divs will flow as inline elements. What I would like to do is to be able to specify a CSS rule that should be applied when sibling divs are laid out on the same line (i.e. there is no line break inserted inbetween).

As an example, let's assume that the divs above are laid out as in the following diagram:

[ 1 ][ 2 ][ 3 ][ 4 ]
[ 5 ][ 6 ] 

I would like to write a CSS rule that either matches elements 2, 3, 4 and 6 (i.e. divs with sibling(s) laid out on the same line) or the inverse set (elements 1 and 5, i.e. divs with no prior siblings laid out on the same line).

This would be really useful for styling, e.g. (supposing ++ is the selector I'm looking for)

.container > div ++ .container > div {
  /* separator between elements on the same line */
  border-right:1px solid #000; 
}
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There is no way in CSS to select elements based on what you are asking for. –  CBroe Mar 25 '13 at 13:45
    
Perhaps this can be done with jQuery, by selecting elements that match position().left –  Joe Frambach Mar 25 '13 at 13:45
    
I think you're trying to re-purpose HTML there. The space between tags really shouldn't be used for this purpose. More like, there should be some kind of logical grouping (via class names in markup or code). There may be a way to solve your problem, but I'm not sure it's the right thing to be doing. –  Jeff Watkins Mar 25 '13 at 13:46
    
Or rather, repurposing CSS selectors. The only way for this to make sense as a CSS selector is if a pseudo-class or pseudo-element were to be used instead, but this would be too complicated to reasonably implement as one. A combinator isn't suitable because "line breaks" are a non-existent concept in terms of the DOM. –  BoltClock Mar 25 '13 at 13:54
    
CSS is a "one way" directive that tells the browser how to style the HTML content of the page. It cannot then receive back from the browser how its directives were used. –  winterblood Mar 25 '13 at 13:55

3 Answers 3

There is no such option in CSS, although it would be useful. You could detect it in javascript by retrieving positioningdata, like it's Y offset from the document. When it is different, you can add classnames for alternate styling. Just a quick jQuery example:

var topOffset;
$(document).ready(function(){
    $('.container div').each(function(index){
        if (index === 0) {
          // first item, set offset
          topOffset = $(this).offset().top;
          $(this).addClass('new-row');
        } else if (topOffset < $(this).offset().top){
          // new item, new row

          $(this).addClass('new-row');
          topOffset = $(this).offset().top;
        }
    });
});

This should result in:

<div class="container">
  <div class="new-row">1</div>
  <div>2</div>
  <div>3</div>
  <div>4</div>
  <div class="new-row">5</div>
  <div>6</div>
</div>

This can be styled appropiatly using the class selectors.

EDIT Working example on jsFiddle

Note: does not work on resize, but that can be fixed when you move it into a function that is called on window resize.

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1  
I'd just use a class name like 'first-item' or something, instead of having to style each row individually. –  Seer Mar 25 '13 at 14:13
1  
Good point, I'll edit my example –  Justus Romijn Mar 25 '13 at 14:14

One thing you can try, is the nth-child() selector. But you may have to change how you approach this situation.

For example, let's say you wanted this so you could have a gap between all of the elements, apart from at the beginning and the end of each row, even when flowing onto new lines, you could do something like this:

HTML:

<div class="container">
    <div class="item">1</div>
    <div class="item">2</div>
    <div class="item">3</div>
    <div class="item">4</div>
    <div class="item">5</div>
    <div class="item">6</div>
</div>

CSS:

.container {
    border: 1px solid red;
    width: 810px;
}

.container > .item {
    border: 1px solid blue;
    display: inline-block;
    margin-right: 10px;
    width: 190px;
}

.container > .item:nth-child(4n) {
    margin-right: 0;
}

With this, you could have something like:

----------------------------------
|  1  |  |  2  |  |  3  |  |  4  |
----------------------------------
|  5  |  |  6  |
----------------------------------

Notice the gap between the child elements. You can of course use this method to apply other styles too, i.e. borders only inbetween 2 divs.

I hope this helps :)

Fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/p6rn9/

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1  
This does not cover all viewport situations, sometimes there can be 5 items on a row, but on other occassions just 3 or 4. –  Justus Romijn Mar 25 '13 at 13:58
    
Then what you want is impossible with CSS. You will have to use a JS solution. I'm going to update this answer, and post a fiddle, you can try out my solution. It may be clearer that way. –  Seer Mar 25 '13 at 14:06
    
Have a look at the fiddle. Unless what you're saying is that sometimes there will multiple rows of 3, then multiple rows of 4, and sometimes multiple rows of 5 too... –  Seer Mar 25 '13 at 14:08

Maybe it is a little bit late, but I suppose you want to display items whitout the boring margins on the left or right of the line.

If you use the margin-left: 10px or the margin-right: 10px to the element you will have:

+----------+------+----------+------+
| l_margin | col1 | l_margin | col2 |        (with l-margins)
+----------+------+----------+------+

+------+----------+------+----------+
| col1 | r_margin | col2 | r_margin |        (with r-margins)
+------+----------+------+----------+

Like you can see, you have always one margins too much and if you want center it you have some trouble.

For solve it simply add to the parent element a margin-left: -10px or margin-right: -10px with a negative value equals to the margins between your elements.

+------+----------+------+----------+------+
|                   page                   | -r_margin 
+------+----------+------+----------+------+
| col1 | r_margin | col2 | r_margin | col3 | r_margin  
+------+----------+------+----------+------+

The margins remains out of the page, so you can center your rows whitout problems!

jsFiddle Demo

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