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I want to calculate the row-wise dot product of two matrices of the same dimension as fastest as possible. This is the way I am doing it:

import numpy as np
a=np.array([[1,2,3],[3,4,5]])
b=np.array([[1,2,3],[1,2,3]])
result=np.array([])
for row1,row2 in a,b:
    result=np.append(result,np.dot(row1,row2))
print result

and of course the output is:

[ 26.  14.]
share|improve this question
2  
Is your Python code what you really want? You're taking the dot product of the first and second rows of a, and the dot product of the first and second rows of b, not the dot product of every i-th row of a and b. – jorgeca Mar 25 '13 at 14:35
    
as jorgeca said, the for indexing is wrong: in that code snippet you are doing: dot(a[0,:],a[1,:]), dot(b[0,:], b[1,:]), see stackoverflow.com/questions/1663807/… – lib Jul 22 '14 at 9:30
    
Thanks for explanation but no I was really looking for what I wrote, i.e. two multiply rows with the same index. – Cupitor Jul 22 '14 at 10:52
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Check out numpy.einsum for another method:

In [52]: a
Out[52]: 
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [3, 4, 5]])

In [53]: b
Out[53]: 
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [1, 2, 3]])

In [54]: einsum('ij,ij->i', a, b)
Out[54]: array([14, 26])

Looks like einsum is a bit faster than inner1d:

In [94]: %timeit inner1d(a,b)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.8 us per loop

In [95]: %timeit einsum('ij,ij->i', a, b)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.6 us per loop

In [96]: a = random.randn(10, 100)

In [97]: b = random.randn(10, 100)

In [98]: %timeit inner1d(a,b)
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.89 us per loop

In [99]: %timeit einsum('ij,ij->i', a, b)
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.03 us per loop
share|improve this answer
1  
I like einsum very much and it is true that you can avoid loops with it. However, if performance and not code style is your primary concern, you might still be better off with dot and the loop (depending on your specific data and system environment). In contrast to einsum, dot can take advantage of BLAS and will often multithread automatically. mail.scipy.org/pipermail/numpy-discussion/2012-October/… – PiQuer Dec 14 '14 at 23:46

Straightforward way to do that is:

import numpy as np
a=np.array([[1,2,3],[3,4,5]])
b=np.array([[1,2,3],[1,2,3]])
np.sum(a*b, axis=1)

which avoids the python loop and is faster in cases like:

def npsumdot(x, y):
    return np.sum(x*y, axis=1)

def loopdot(x, y):
    result = np.empty((x.shape[0]))
    for i in range(x.shape[0]):
        result[i] = np.dot(x[i], y[i])
    return result

timeit npsumdot(np.random.rand(500000,50),np.random.rand(500000,50))
# 1 loops, best of 3: 861 ms per loop
timeit loopdot(np.random.rand(500000,50),np.random.rand(500000,50))
# 1 loops, best of 3: 1.58 s per loop
share|improve this answer

You'll do better avoiding the append, but I can't think of a way to avoid the python loop. A custom Ufunc perhaps? I don't think numpy.vectorize will help you here.

import numpy as np
a=np.array([[1,2,3],[3,4,5]])
b=np.array([[1,2,3],[1,2,3]])
result=np.empty((2,))
for i in range(2):
    result[i] = np.dot(a[i],b[i]))
print result

EDIT

Based on this answer, it looks like inner1d might work if the vectors in your real-world problem are 1D.

from numpy.core.umath_tests import inner1d
inner1d(a,b)  # array([14, 26])
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