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I have these two sections of code

#pragma omp parallel
#pragma omp sections
  {
#pragma omp section
    printf("H");
#pragma omp section
    printf("e");
#pragma omp section
    printf("l");
#pragma omp section
    printf("l");
#pragma omp section
    printf("o");
#pragma omp section
    printf(" ");
#pragma omp section
    printf("W");
#pragma omp section
    printf("o");
#pragma omp section
    printf("r");
#pragma omp section
    printf("l");
#pragma omp section
    printf("d");
#pragma omp section
    printf("!");
  }

and

char word[] = "Hello World!";
int n;

#pragma omp parallel for
  for(n=0; n<12; n++)
  {
  printf("%c", word[n]);
  }

while the first one always prints Hello World! the second one sometimes prints Hello World! and sometimes prints Helld!lo Wor

Why is it that first one seems deterministic and the other does not?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First of all, the official GCC 4.1.2 does not support OpenMP. Probably you have a RedHat-derived Linux distribution (RHEL, Fedora, CentOS, Scientific Linux, etc.) which has OpenMP support backported into GCC 4.1.2 from some newer version. RH used to maintain that backport for quite some time until they finally switched to a newer GCC version.

Writing to a shared stream results in non-deterministic behaviour in both OpenMP sections and parallel loops. What you observe here is a result of the dynamic scheduling nature of the sections implementation in GCC. libgomp (GCC OpenMP runtime) distributes sections on first-come first-served basis among the threads in the team. What probably happens in your case is that sections are so short in size and therefore in execution time, that the first thread to exit the docking barrier at the beginning of the parallel region consumes all work items before the other threads have even caught up, resulting in serial execution of all sections.

As for the parallel for loop, what you observe is the result of the default loop scheduling in libgomp being static, i.e. the 12 iterations are evenly split among the threads in a linear fashion. I would guess that there are 6 threads in your case (based on the text segments from the scrambled output), so thread 0 gets iterations from 0 to 1, thread 1 gets iterations from 2 to 3, and so on. Again, the execution of the iterations in each thread is very well defined, but there is no guarantee in what order would the threads themselves execute.

Note that this behaviour is very GCC-specific. The OpenMP standard says:

The method of scheduling the structured blocks among threads in the team is implementation defined.

For example, Intel's compiler distributes the sections in a round-robin fashion, i.e. section n is given to thread n % num_threads, much like what a parallel for loop with static scheduling and chunk size of 1 would do.

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Sections are not deterministic, neither are parallel fors. The OpenMP specs here say nothing about sections being deterministic.

I ran your sections code with 2 threads and got Hllo World!e

It was just chance that your code produced the letters in order.

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now i am confused. i ran mine with 4 threads. i ran it like 50 times. it was same. –  btevfik Mar 26 '13 at 1:11
    
The specs say it is implementation defined. Perhaps your compiler orders it. But that cannot be relied on. What compiler did you use? I ran it on gcc 4.7 –  KVM Mar 26 '13 at 2:11
    
gcc version 4.1.2 –  btevfik Mar 26 '13 at 2:14
    
4.1.2 is fairly old. Maybe you could try on a newer gcc and see if you see different behavior. In any case, if the specs do not say, it cannot be accepted as standard behaviour. –  KVM Mar 26 '13 at 2:30
    
this is on a school computer. i cannot update the gcc. but you are right, we cannot assume this as standart behaviour. i was actually expecting the similar results to what you got, that's why i asked the question. –  btevfik Mar 26 '13 at 2:33

If you want the for loop to do the same thing use "ordered" in your for loop like this:

#pragma omp parallel for ordered 
for(n=0; n<12; n++) {
    #pragma omp ordered
    printf("%c", word[n]);
}

See this example: http://bisqwit.iki.fi/story/howto/openmp/#ExampleCalculatingTheMandelbrotFractalInParallel

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It's correct example, but we should notice, that using parallel for to do something in order is the triumph of form over content - it doesn't have sense. –  Tomasz Dzięcielewski Mar 26 '13 at 9:52
1  
I agree that in this particular example ordered removes all the parallelism but that does not mean that in general using ordered in for loops has no utility. –  user2088790 Mar 26 '13 at 10:12

omp parallel for is not deterministic. You should use this clause to implement algorithms, which have independent data in array. If you are printing some text, letters should follow one by one in order, but omp parallel for execute code in random order.

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So 'sections' is deterministic? –  btevfik Mar 25 '13 at 16:38
    
Yes, you have parallel part of code and each section will execute one by one in order and only one thread will execute one of them. You can find detail on this page: computing.llnl.gov/tutorials/openMP –  Tomasz Dzięcielewski Mar 25 '13 at 19:03
    
thank you...... –  btevfik Mar 25 '13 at 19:04
    
You're welcome. –  Tomasz Dzięcielewski Mar 25 '13 at 19:13
3  
This is not correct. Sections can execute in any order if processed by multiple threads. –  Hristo Iliev Mar 26 '13 at 15:04

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