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I was asked an algorithmic question today in an interview and i would love to get SO members' input on the same. The question was as follows;

Given equally sized N arrays with integers in ascending order, how would you select the numbers common to all N arrays.

At first my thought was to iterate over elements starting from the first array trickling down to the rest of the arrays. But then that would result in N power N iterations if i am right. So then i came up with a solution to add the count to a map by keeping the element as the key and the value as the counter. This way i believe the time complexity is just N. Following is the implementation in Java of my approach

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int[] arr1 = { 1, 4, 6, 8,11,15 };
    int[] arr2 = { 3, 4, 6, 9, 10,16 };
    int[] arr3 = { 1, 4, 6, 13,15,16 };
    System.out.println(commonNumbers(arr1, arr2, arr3));
}

public static List<Integer> commonNumbers(int[] arr1, int[] arr2, int[] arr3) {
    Map<Integer, Integer>countMap = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();

    for(int element:arr1)
    {
        countMap.put(element, 1);
    }

    for(int element:arr2)
    {
        if(countMap.containsKey(element))
        {
            countMap.put(element,countMap.get(element)+1);
        }
    }

    for(int element:arr3)
    {
        if(countMap.containsKey(element))
        {
            countMap.put(element,countMap.get(element)+1);
        }
    }

    List<Integer>toReturn = new LinkedList<Integer>();

    for(int key:countMap.keySet())
    {
        int count = countMap.get(key);
        if(count==3)toReturn.add(key);
    }

    return toReturn;
}

I just did this for three arrays to see how it will work. Question talks about N Arrays though i think this would still hold.

My question is, is there a better approach to solve this problem with time complexity in mind?

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possible duplicate of Find unique common element from 3 arrays –  Trey Jackson Mar 27 '13 at 22:01
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9 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Treat as 3 queues. While values are different, "remove" (by incrementing the array index) the smallest. When they match, "remove" (and record) the matches.

int i1 = 0;
int i2 = 0;
int i3 = 0;

while (i1 < array1.size && i2 < array2.size && i3 < array3.size) {
    int next1 = array1[i1];
    int next2 = array2[i2];
    int next3 = array3[i3];

    if (next1 == next2 && next1 == next3) {
        recordMatch(next1);
        i1++;
        i2++;
        i3++;
    }
    else if (next1 < next2 && next1 < next3) {
        i1++;
    }
    else if (next2 < next1 && next2 < next3) {
        i2++;
    }
    else {
        i3++;
    }
}

Easily generalized to N arrays, though with N large you'd want to optimize the compares somehow (NPE's "heap").

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2  
Please rephrase the answer with more explanation. –  SparKot ॐ Mar 25 '13 at 15:09
    
Well, NPE said essentially the same thing. But I'll maybe add a little more explanation. –  Hot Licks Mar 25 '13 at 15:10
    
Thanks alot. Nice approach to solving the issue with lesser time complexity. Appreciate the time taken to put down the code to increase the clarity of the answer. –  dinukadev Mar 25 '13 at 16:04
    
@dinukadev - It's actually a fairly common "pattern". As others have said, "mergesort" uses it, and you find other places. Eg, I've used it several times for comparing two file directories. –  Hot Licks Mar 25 '13 at 16:25
1  
This solution should be fixed to deal with equal numbers. For example, for next1=next2<next3, it fails. –  Eyal Schneider Mar 25 '13 at 16:59
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I think this can be solved with a single parallel iteration over the N arrays, and an N-element min-heap. In the heap you would keep the current element from each of the N input arrays.

The idea is that at each step you'd advance along the array whose element is at the top of the heap (i.e. is the smallest).

You'll need to be able to detect when the heap consists entirely of identical values. This can be done in constant time as long as you keep track of the largest element you've added to the heap.

If each array contains M elements, the worst-case time complexity of the would be O(M*N*log(N)) and it would require O(N) memory.

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Thx alot for the answer. Together with Hot Licks answer it was easy for me to understand. Thank you for taking the time to leave by your answer. –  dinukadev Mar 25 '13 at 16:05
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try

public static Set<Integer> commonNumbers(int[] arr1, int[] arr2, int[] arr3) {
    Set<Integer> s1 = createSet(arr1);
    Set<Integer> s2 = createSet(arr2);
    Set<Integer> s3 = createSet(arr3);
    s1.retainAll(s2);
    s1.retainAll(s3);
    return s1;
}

private static Set<Integer> createSet(int[] arr) {
    Set<Integer> s = new HashSet<Integer>();
    for (int e : arr) {
        s.add(e);
    }
    return s;
}
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Hi Evgeniy, this would definitely work and thank you very much for your answer. I failed to mention that they did not want me to use any of the standard library methods when solving this. –  dinukadev Mar 25 '13 at 15:55
1  
@dinukadev: You can easily replace the retainAll call with your implementation. The average time complexity of this solution is NxM. Nice. –  Eyal Schneider Mar 25 '13 at 16:07
    
@Eyal, Thank you for the clarification. –  dinukadev Mar 25 '13 at 16:09
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This is how I learned to do it in an algorithms class. Not sure if it's "better", but it uses less memory and less overhead because it iterates straight through the arrays instead of building a map first.

public static List<Integer> commonNumbers(int[] arr1, int[] arr2, int[] arr3, ... , int[] arrN) {
    List<Integer>toReturn = new LinkedList<Integer>();

    int len = arr1.length;
    int j = 0, k = 0, ... , counterN = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        while (arr2[j] < arr1[i] && j < len) j++;
        while (arr3[k] < arr1[i] && k < len) k++;
        ...
        while (arrN[counterN] < arr1[i] && counterN < len) counterN++;
        if (arr1[i] == arr2[j] && arr2[j] == arr3[k] && ... && arr1[i] == arrN[counterN]) {
            toReturn.add(arr1[i]);
        }
    }

    return toReturn;
}
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This may be solved in O(M * N) with M being the length of arrays.

Let's see what happens for N = 2, this would be a sorted-list intersection problem, which has a classic merge-like solution running in O(l1 + l2) time. (l1 = length of first array, l2 = length of second array). (Find out more about Merge Algorithms.)

Now, let's re-iterate the algorithm N times in an inductive matter. (e.g. i-th time we will have the i-th array, and the intersection result of previous step). This would result in an overall O(M * N) algorithm.

You may also observe that this worst case upper-bound is the best achievable, since all the numbers must be taken into account for any valid algorithm. So, no deterministic algorithm with a tighter upper-bound may be founded.

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+1 Best algorithm among the ones presented so far (both in worst case time complexity and in auxiliary space usage). Also, very easy to implement. –  Eyal Schneider Mar 25 '13 at 18:15
    
It isn't true that all numbers must be taken into account for any valid algorithm. For example, suppose that all the arrays except X start with the number 1, and X contains all-zeroes. You only have to look at all of X and the first numbers in each of the other arrays. –  jwpat7 Mar 25 '13 at 19:09
    
@jwpat7 We're talking about "worst-case" analysis, in which the algorithm must give correct output for "any arbitrary" input, not just for a "single instance" of the problem. In other words, I am claiming that no other algorithm may have a [asymptotically] better running time on "every" single instance of problem. –  SeMeKh Mar 25 '13 at 19:18
    
Yes, I realize you are trying to state a worst-case figure, but you haven't supported your claim that any valid algorithm must look at all entries. Given sorted arrays of integers in ascending order, the claim could very well be false. Of course, if given sorted arrays of integers in non-descending order, it obviously is true. BTW, to prove your claim, you need to show that for any possible algorithm there exists an input where that algorithm has to look at all entries. I, on the other hand, do not need to present counter-examples, but merely need to poke holes in your "proof". –  jwpat7 Mar 25 '13 at 19:42
1  
But let's do it, just to make it complete: Consider N equivalent arrays of length M containing the numbers {2, 4, ..., 2M}, and run the algorithm on it. Suppose the algorithm runs without examining (at least) one of the elements in one of the arrays (let's say X). Being valid, it should return {2, 4, ..., 2M} as the common elements. Now, change X to X + 1, and since the algorithm is deterministic, it should terminate without examining "that" element, and returning the "same" result, which is obviously incorrect. So either the algorithm is incorrect, or all the elements were examined. –  SeMeKh Mar 25 '13 at 21:52
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Okay - maybe a bit naive here, but I think the clue is that the arrays are in ascending order. My java is rusty, but here is some pseduocode. I haven't tested it, so it's probably not perfect, but it should be a fast way to do this:

I = 1
J = 1
K = 1

While I <= Array1Count and J <= Array2Count and K <= Array3Count

   If Array1(I) = Array2(J)
      If Array1(I) = Array3(K)
         === Found Match
         I++
         J++
         K++
      else
         if Array1(I) < Array3(K)
            I++
         end if
      end if
   else
      If Array1(I) < Array2(J)
         I++
      else
         if Array2(J) < Array3(K)
            J++
         else
            K++
         end if
      end if
   end if
Wend

This is Option Base 1 - you'd have to recode to do option base 0 (like java and other languages have)

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Thx for your answer. Hot Licks have done the same in the answer provided in Java. Your pseudo code hit the right spot as well and appreciate your time to write it down. –  dinukadev Mar 25 '13 at 16:06
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I think another approach is to do similar thing to what we do in Mergesort: walk through all the arrays at the same time, getting identical numbers. This would take advantage of the fact that the arrays are in sorted order, and would use no additional space other than the output array. If you just need to print the common numbers, no extra space is used.

public static List<Integer> commonNumbers(int[] arrA, int[] arrB, int[] arrC) {
   int[] idx = {0, 0, 0};

   while (idxA<arrA.length && idxB<arrB.length && idxC<arrC.length) {
      if ( arrA[idx[0]]==arrB[idx[1]] && arrB[idx[1]]==arrC[idx[2]] ) {
          // Same number
          System.out.print("Common number %d\n", arrA[idx[0]]);
          for (int i=0;i<3;i++)
              idx[i]++;
      } else {
          // Increase the index of the lowest number
          int idxLowest = 0; int nLowest = arrA[idx[0]];
          if (arrB[idx[1]] < nLowest) {
             idxLowest = 1;
             nLowest = arrB[idx[1]];
          }
          if (arrC[idx[2]] < nLowest) {
             idxLowest = 2;
          }
          idx[idxLowest]++;
      }
   }
}

To make this more general you may want to take an arrays of arrays of ints, this will let you make the code more pretty. The array indeces must be stored in an array, otherwise it is hard to code the "increment the index that points to the lowest number" code.

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public static List<Integer> getCommon(List<List<Integer>> list){
    Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();

    int c=0;
    for (List<Integer> is : list) {
        c++;
        for (int i : is) {
            if(map.containsKey(i)){
                map.put(i, map.get(i)+1);
            }else{
                map.put(i, 1);
            }
        }
    }
     List<Integer>toReturn = new LinkedList<Integer>();
    for(int key:map.keySet())
    {
        int count = map.get(key);
        if(count==c)toReturn.add(key);
    }
    return toReturn;
}
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Your solution is acceptable, but it uses NxM space. You can do it with O(N) space (where N is the number of arrays), or in O(1) space.

Solution #1 (By Luigi Mendoza)

Assuming there are many small arrays (M << N), this can be useful, resulting in O(M*N*Log M) time, and constant space (excluding the output list).

Solution #2

Scan the arrays in ascending order, maintaining a min-heap of size N, containing the latest visited values (and indices) of the arrays. Whenever the heap contains N copies of the same value, add the value to the output collection. Otherwise, remove the min value and advance with the corresponding list.

The time complexity of this solution is O(M*N*Log N)

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