Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create a 10 GB file that looks like:

prefix:username:timestamp, number

So an example is like:

login:jbill:2013/3/25, 1

I want to create a 10GB file, by creating random rows like the one above.

How could I do this in Go?

I can have an array of prefixes like:

login, logout, register

And also an array of usernames:

jbill, dkennedy
share|improve this question
    
what about the time stamp and the number at the end, should they stay the same? What is the allowed range of these two if they should change on every entry? –  topskip Mar 25 '13 at 16:08
1  
@user1361315 Where is your actual problem? I can't see it. –  nemo Mar 25 '13 at 16:14
    
@topskip timestamp can be any valid time in 2012. the number can by any random number between 1-100. –  loyalflow Mar 25 '13 at 16:19
1  
@nemo do-my-homework-for-me? :) –  topskip Mar 25 '13 at 16:20
1  
@topskip ha! I'm out of school and into the real world, just not that proficient with Go and buffers etc. b/c its a huge file. –  loyalflow Mar 25 '13 at 16:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For example,

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "math/rand"
    "os"
    "strconv"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    fileSize := int64(10e9) // 10GB
    f, err := os.Create("/tmp/largefile")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    w := bufio.NewWriter(f)
    prefixes := []string{"login", "logout", "register"}
    names := []string{"jbill", "dkennedy"}
    timeStart := time.Date(2012, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, time.UTC)
    timeDur := timeStart.AddDate(1, 0, 0).Sub(timeStart)
    rand.Seed(time.Now().UnixNano())
    size := int64(0)
    for size < fileSize {
        // prefix:username:timestamp, number
        // login:jbill:2012/3/25, 1
        prefix := prefixes[int(rand.Int31n(int32(len(prefixes))))]
        name := names[int(rand.Int31n(int32(len(names))))]
        time := timeStart.Add(time.Duration(rand.Int63n(int64(timeDur)))).Format("2006/1/2")
        number := strconv.Itoa(int(rand.Int31n(100) + 1))
        line := prefix + ":" + name + ":" + time + ", " + number + "\n"
        n, err := w.WriteString(line)
        if err != nil {
            fmt.Println(n, err)
            return
        }
        size += int64(len(line))
    }
    err = w.Flush()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    err = f.Close()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    fmt.Println("Size:", size)
}

Output:

register:jbill:2012/8/24, 15
login:jbill:2012/10/7, 98
register:dkennedy:2012/8/29, 70
register:jbill:2012/6/1, 89
register:jbill:2012/5/24, 63
login:dkennedy:2012/3/29, 48
logout:jbill:2012/7/8, 93
logout:dkennedy:2012/1/12, 74
login:jbill:2012/4/12, 14
login:jbill:2012/2/5, 83
share|improve this answer

This is a naive approach (1GB):

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    myfile, err := os.OpenFile("myfile", os.O_WRONLY|os.O_CREATE, 0644)
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    defer myfile.Close()
    var pos int
    var line string
    // sample: login:jbill:2013/3/25, 1
    line = fmt.Sprintf("%s:%s:%s, %d\n", "login", "jbill", "2013/3/25", 1)
    for pos < 1024*1024*1024 {
        bytes, err := myfile.Write([]byte(line))
        if err != nil {
            log.Fatal(err)
        }
        pos = pos + bytes
    }
}

which takes forever (1:16), because the output is not buffered. By adding bufio you can decrease the time dramatically

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    myfile, err := os.OpenFile("myfile", os.O_WRONLY|os.O_CREATE, 0644)
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    defer myfile.Close()
    mybufferedfile := bufio.NewWriter(myfile)
    var pos int
    var line string
    // sample: login:jbill:2013/3/25, 1
    line = fmt.Sprintf("%s:%s:%s, %d\n", "login", "jbill", "2013/3/25", 1)
    for pos < 1024*1024*1024 {
        bytes, err := mybufferedfile.WriteString(line)
        if err != nil {
            log.Fatal(err)
        }
        pos = pos + bytes
    }
    err = mybufferedfile.Flush()
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
}

Still 26 sec on my machine, I'd like to see a faster solution.

BTW: you need to do the random fileds, but that is left as an exercise to the reader :)

share|improve this answer
    
Disclaimer: I am a novice and the code should be taken with care. It might not be the best solution. It might not even be a good solution. –  topskip Mar 25 '13 at 16:52
    
26 seconds isn't that bad :) so basically the buffered writer wraps the original file. How does this add newlines? –  loyalflow Mar 25 '13 at 17:43
    
See the line with the fmt.Sprintf - this adds a newline. The real application would be slower, since the fmt.Sprintf has to be called in every loop including random number generation and array lookup. –  topskip Mar 25 '13 at 17:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.